Secondary: Key Stage 3, Key Stage 4

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 Religious EducationSecondary: Key Stage 3, Key Stage 468531255023350Curriculum plan 2020-2190000081324001. Curriculum PrinciplesCoherence and flexibilityWe strive to support schools by giving them an online learning offer that can be flexible to fit alongside their existing curriculum. We need to balance this together with coherence as complete flexibility would imply only standalone lessons where none can build upon any other. In striking this balance, we will lean towards giving the maximum flexibility possible (where this does not compromise coherence). With KS3, we want to provide schools with units that give clear knowledge on the beliefs and practices within religions, as well as non-religious worldviews, that can easily slot into, or work alongside a school’s current curriculum. With KS4, we want to include ‘units’ that mirror the GCSE curriculum offers, alongside some standalone lessons which cover examination skills.Knowledge organisationRE is made up of a matrix of elements. These include: History: For example, being able to understand Christianity requires a knowledge of the historical context of Judaism and Israel. Beliefs: For example, the claim by Muslims that Muhammad is the last prophet.Practices: For example, the practice of Passover has grown out of the belief that God saved Jews from Egypt. Themes: For example, the beliefs and practices of Islam and Christianity and how this impacts contemporary views around Relationships and Families. We have chosen to organise it by beliefs and practices initially and then lead into how these impact themes at KS4. Other elements will be woven into the curriculum.Knowledge in Religious EducationIn Religious Education, when a religious believer knows something they hold a claim of some sort. They regard their claim as true. Therefore, knowledge of those beliefs is a form of factual knowledge, or ‘second-order claims’. It is best to encourage pupils to regard knowledge claims, made by teachers, in these online lessons, about what a religious person believes and practices, as second-order claims. Alongside this ‘second-order’ claims, the substantive knowledge, we also want students to consider the disciplinary knowledge within religious studies: the methods of learning about religious beliefs and practices, the status of revelation for different groups within a faith, the influence and impact of Jewish thinking on Christian beliefs and teachings etc. Pupil engagementWe need pupils to be thinking during their lessons - both to engage with the subject and to strengthen memory of what is being learnt. Our lessons will not be video lectures, there will be regular ‘pause points’ (opportunities to answer questions, to do short tasks) and to complete examination style questions (at both KS3 and KS4) that require them to use material studied during that lesson. This is done to emulate classroom teaching as much as possible. We seek to exercise pupils’ minds throughout their lessons. This will involve questions and tasks throughout instruction, just as we would with classroom teaching. Religious Education naturally lends itself towards narrative and debate, which are intrinsically motivating and help with engagement and memory.Motivation through learningLike all teachers, we recognise that good presentation helps pupils keep participating in our lessons. However, we are teachers, and not entertainers. We seek to motivate children through our subject. We believe that what we teach is inherently interesting, and that the joy of learning is our primary motivator. We strongly believe this approach to religious studies (intellectually stimulating, choice of the most powerful knowledge, structure of video lessons etc.) will build motivation in pupils. Lessons will be constructed in a way that builds self-efficacy throughout the lessons, and encourages them to respond positively to the build up of challenge. We want students to be within the ‘struggle zone’ (Allison and Tharby, ‘Making every lesson count’), where there is high challenge, low stress. Where thinking is required, where effective learning takes place. Where we can avoid cognitive overload and therefore build motivation in the pupils. 2. Subject structure overviewKey stageUnit titleLength of unitPrior knowledge requiredKS3Judaism: beliefs and teachings13KS3Judaism: practices13Judaism: beliefs and teachingsKS3Christianity: beliefs and teachings13Judaism: beliefs and teachings and Judaism: practices (useful but not a necessity)KS3Christianity: practices13Christianity: beliefs and teachingsKS3Islam: beliefs and teachings13KS3Islam: practices13Islam: beliefs and teachingsKS3Buddhism: beliefs and teachings13KS3Buddhism: practices13Buddhism: beliefs and teachingsKS3Non-religious world views13Key stageUnit titleLength of unitPrior knowledge requiredKS4Christian beliefs and teachings14KS4Christian practices14Christian beliefsKS4Islamic beliefs and teachings14KS4Islamic practices14Islamic beliefsKS4Matters of life and death14Beliefs and practices unitsKS4Relationship and families14Beliefs and practices unitsKS4Crime and punishment14Beliefs and practices unitsKS4Peace and conflict14Beliefs and practices unitsKS4Human rights14Beliefs and practices unitsKS4: Followed by four ‘standalone’ lessons focusing on examination skills such as structuring of examination ‘explain’ and ‘discuss/evaluate’ questions, as well as guidance given on how to interpret and answer the ‘discuss/evaluate’ questions in a way that addresses the question. For example, a lesson on how to appropriately answer a question such as ‘The best way to understand Allah is to practise Zakah’, so that the answer specifically focuses on practices as ways of understanding Allah rather than just explaining the importance of the practices. Or focusing on a word in the statement which allows for greater depth of discussion e.g. ‘The Qur’an is the only source of authority a Muslim needs’ would focus on the word ‘only’ being something to discuss in detail. 3. Suggested sequenceWe do not want to prescribe a sequence for KS3, as schools will most likely want to fit Oak’s curriculum alongside their own. However, there are a number of suggested sequences:Schools may want to take the approach of studying the beliefs unit of a religion, and then the practices unit, so they are building on knowledge of that religion successively.Schools may want to take the approach of interleaving, by studying the beliefs units of the religions first, and then returning to the practices units. We do suggest, however, that the Abrahamic religions are taught together, so students have an understanding of the difference between Abrahamic and Dharmic religions. There is an opportunity there for schools to draw out the differences, as well as the similarities.The non-religious worldviews, philosophy and ethics unit is designed to work both as a whole unit but also as standalone lessons where needed. Some prior knowledge from other lessons may be useful, but not a necessity for this unit.Unit numberUnit title1Judaism: beliefs and teachings2Judaism: practices3Christianity: beliefs and teachings4Christianity: practices5Islam: beliefs and teachings6Islam: practices7Buddhism: beliefs and teachings8Buddhism: practices9Non-religious world viewsSuggested KS4 sequenceWe suggest that schools begin with Islam at the start of the KS4 because it is usually more alien to most pupils than Christianity, or at least most pupils have some prior knowledge on Christianity. This gives us more time to work on misconceptions. We start with Islamic beliefs rather than practices because largely (though not always) beliefs inform practices not the other way around. It would therefore be more than possible to start with Christian beliefs and teachings and Christian practices then look at the units on Islam if the demographic of the school may suggest that students are less familiar than the concepts within the Christianity units. We suggest that the thematic units are better understood if the building blocks of the beliefs, teachings and practices are taught first, and therefore suggest these as the content covered after the beliefs and teachings and practices units. It would be difficult, for example, to teach Islamic views on the concept of a just war if the concept of jihad had not been taught in Islamic practices first. Nevertheless, the building blocks of units can be used and tailored to individual schools.There are four standalone lessons which are teaching examination skills. The recommendation is that these are introduced to pupils midway through a unit, or before the examination question practise lesson. Effectively, these can be introduced when it seems most appropriate for that class. The idea is that pupils will gain an understanding of structure and the best methods for answering questions, which can be useful across all examination boards where applicable. Each unit finishes with a ‘deliberate practice’ lesson. This is to build schemas and commit learning to long term memory such as key words and key quotations. It will emulate to them some of the best ways for retrieval practice and building long term memory. Unit numberUnit title1Islamic beliefs and teachings2Islamic practices3Christian beliefs and teachings4Christian practices5Matters of life and death6Relationships and families7Crime and punishment8Human rights9Peace and conflict4. Unit specificsKS3- Judaism: beliefs and teachingsLessonCore contentLesson content1Understanding of God in historyFreewillGod as all knowing2Concept of GodNames of GodQualities of God3CreationCreation from nothing, days of creationShabbatHumans created in God’s image4Chosen peopleAbraham and the promised landStatus as chosen peopleIsaac and Jacob (12 tribes)5The Foremothers (Biblical women)Foremothers: Sara, Rebecca, Rachel & Leah; Miriam (Moses' sister); Deborah (the prophetess)6Moses and the ExodusThe story of PassoverJourney to Sinai7Moses and the Commandments10 commandments613 MitzvotTorah8Recap and practiceAn opportunity to recap the learning in the first seven lessons. Inclusion of some examination style questions and a return to the key concepts.9Building of the Temple(Temple Period & Start of Rabbinic Judaism)David and SolomonDestruction of the TempleMishnah Talmud1013 principles of faithMaimonides; Shulchan Aruch; tenants of faith and redaction of law. Sefardic & Ashkanazi differences11AfterlifeBeliefs about death and dyingLinks to mourning practices12RevisionRecap of key content explored in the unit13Deliberate practiceDeliberate practice of key words and quotations from the unit Specific explanations of the meaning of key words and the meaning of quotations.KS3- Judaism: practicesLessonCore contentLesson content1Loving GodThe ShemaWhen and how the Shema is saidWhat does it mean to be commanded to love God?2Brit MilahBrit MilahBaby naming ceremony3Bar and bat MitzvahTaking responsibility for following the lawCeremonies and customs4Food lawsKashrutWhat makes food Kosher?5ShabbatOrigin in creationMeaning of ‘rest’ - a day that is different to other daysVariety of practice in Judaism6Recap and practiceAn opportunity to recap the learning in the first five lessons. Inclusion of some examination style questions and a return to the key concepts.7The SynagogueWays of worship in the synagogueThe TorahDifferent denominations8FestivalsPassoverRosh HashanahYom Kippur9Caring for the environmentEnvironmental problemsBeliefs regarding stewardship10Loving your neighbourVisiting the sickLoving kindness (actions of ‘chesed’)11Value of human lifeApplication of Jewish teaching to abortion and euthanasia12RevisionRecap of key content explored in the unit13Deliberate practiceDeliberate practice of key words and quotations from the unit Specific explanations of the meaning of key words and the meaning of quotations.KS3- Christianity: beliefs and teachingsLesson Core contentLesson content1Nature of GodGod as omnipotent, omnibenevolent, creator, eternalWhere these qualities can be found in the creation narrative2TrinityThe mystery of the TrinityOne God, three personsRoles of members of the Trinity3IncarnationNativityGod become flesh4Life of JesusJesus’ teaching, miracles and actions5Crucifixion The events of Holy Week6ResurrectionThe empty tombJesus conquering death7Recap and practiceAn opportunity to recap the learning in the first six lessons. Inclusion of some examination style questions and a return to the key concepts.8AscensionJesus’ ascension to heavenMeaning for Christians todayThe Great Commission9Church and PentecostThe giving of the Holy SpiritNature of the ChurchSpread of the Church into all nations10Sin, judgement and forgivenessJesus’ death as atonement for sinJudgement based on deeds, faith, deeds and faith11AfterlifeDifferent understandings of heaven, hell and purgatory12RevisionRecap of key content explored in the unit13Deliberate practiceDeliberate practice of key words and quotations from the unit Specific explanations of the meaning of key words and the meaning of quotations.KS3- Christianity: practicesLesson Core contentLesson content1Nature of worship: types of worshipExamples of worshipLiturgical and non-liturgicalPublic and private2Nature of worship: buildingFeatures of a churchUse of church in the local community3BaptismInfant and adult baptismR.C and Baptist understandings4EucharistRoman Catholic belief in transubstantiationFree Church beliefs in remembrance meal5ConfessionPractise in Roman CatholicismProtestant / Free church understanding of accountability6Recap and practiceAn opportunity to recap the learning in the first five lessons. Inclusion of some examination style questions and a return to the key concepts7PilgrimageLourdes and Iona8Festivals (Christmas and Easter)Recap on birth narrative and how Christmas is celebratedRecap on Holy Week and how Easter is celebrated9Service and evangelismService in the local community - food banks, street pastorsEvangelism in local community, AlphaMission10Application to human issues: abortion and euthanasiaAge appropriate explanation of abortion and euthanasiaSituation ethicsSanctity of life11Application to non-human issues: stewardshipIdeas of stewardship in the creation narrativeUse of animals for cosmetic and medical testing12RevisionRecap of key content explored in the unit13Deliberate practiceDeliberate practice of key words and quotations from the unit Specific explanations of the meaning of key words and the meaning of quotations.KS3- Islam: beliefs and teachingsLessonCore contentLesson content1Abrahamic originsLife of IbrahimIbrahim’s tests of faithInfluence of Ibrahim on emergence of Islam2MuhammadThe life of Muhammad Revelation of the Qur’anEmergence of Islam after revelation3Sunni/Shi’a splitIslam after the death of MuhammadHow two denominations formedCaliphs/Imams4What is Imamate?Specific focus on the role of the Imamate in Shi’a Islam5Recap and practiceAn opportunity to recap the learning in the first four lessons. Inclusion of some examination style questions and a return to the key concepts6TawhidTawhid as the most important belief in IslamConcept of TawhidInfluence on the life of a Muslim7AngelsNames and roles of particular angels8ProphetsNames and roles of particular prophetsImportance of Muhammad as final prophet9Holy booksImportance of holy books in Islam other than the Qur’anWhy the Qur’an is different to other revelations10Day of judgementBeliefs about what happens when you dieBeliefs on the day of judgementBeliefs about Jannah and Jahannam11Belief in predestinationWhat is predestination and how does it influence a Muslim’s life?12RevisionRecap of key content explored in the unit13Deliberate practiceDeliberate practice of key words and quotations from the unit Specific explanations of the meaning of key words and the meaning of quotations.KS3- Islam: practicesLesson Core contentLesson content1ShahadahIntroduction to the five pillarsShahadah as a beliefHow Shahadah is shown in practice2SalahWhat is the purpose of prayer in Islam?How do Muslims prepare for prayer?3ZakahThe purpose of ZakahWho it is given to?4SawmThe purpose of fasting within IslamHow this looks in practice5HajjThe origins of Hajj ritualsWhat is done on HajjImportance of Hajj6Recap and practiceAn opportunity to recap the learning in the first five lessons. Inclusion of some examination style questions and a return to the key concepts7Id-ul-FitrOrigins of the festivalHow it is celebrated around the world by Muslims8Id-ul-AdhaOrigins of the festivalHow it is celebrated around the world by Muslims9AshuraOrigins of the festivalHow it is celebrated around the world by MuslimsDifference in Sunni/Shi’a beliefs on Ashura10What is Halal?The approach in Islam to the use of animalsWhat is the halal slaughter?Muslim dietary needs11KhalifahA response to the use and treatment of the environment within Islam12RevisionRecap of key content explored in the unit13Deliberate practiceDeliberate practice of key words and quotations from the unit Specific explanations of the meaning of key words and the meaning of quotations.KS3- Buddhism: beliefs and teachingsLesson Core contentLesson content1A brief history of India (Indian Cosmology) Dharma and KarmaBasic precepts of Brahmic philosophy and its relation to the central ideas surrounding the nature of the universe (taught through Hindu philosophy)2The life of Siddhartha GautaumaThe life of the historical Buddha.How we came to the four noble truths.The journey that led to his revelation3Three marks of existenceThe big questions surrounding the idea of self, permanence and suffering4The mind, desire and attachment- the SkandhasWhat is desire and how does it manifest?Are the objects of desire innate or fleeting?Desire from a Buddhist standpoint5Dukkha and the four noble truthsIs suffering universal? Why do we suffer? What is the relationship between desire and suffering? 6Recap and practiceAn opportunity to recap the learning in the first five lessons. Inclusion of some examination style questions and a return to the key concepts.7The Four noble truthsWhat are the four noble truths and why was it a significant revelation in Buddhism?8Dharma, Karma and rebirthHow does action impact on the universal system?Buddhist understanding of dharma, karma and the rebirth9The eightfold pathHow can you ensure that the consequences of your actions create good karmic fruits?Buddhist ethicsEightfold path as help towards people being mindful of their actions10Enlightenment and Lotus flowerThe final attainmentWhat is this mystical state known as being Enlightened?11The wisdom of the Buddha and Buddhist writings - the TripitakaParables and teachings of the Buddha such as Kisa and the mustard seedExtracts from the DhammapadaThe meaning of these texts and links to Buddhist philosophy12RevisionRecap of key content explored in the unit13Deliberate practiceDeliberate practice of key words and quotations from the unit Specific explanations of the meaning of key words and the meaning of quotations.KS3- Buddhism: practicesLesson Core contentLesson content1MeditationWhat is meditation? What is the goal of meditation?Meditation within Buddhist practice and why it is seen as a central tool to live a good life.2Temples and practiceA Vihara and how the building and practices within are symbolic of Buddhist teachings and the journey of enlightenment.3The Sangha - monks and nuns (renunciation)The journey towards enlightenmentWhy some renounce the world and seek deep discoveryHow the Sanha provides support and protection for this journeyControversy in how monks and nuns have dedicated their lives.4Loving kindness and the eightfold pathThe Buddhist commitment to living through the eightfold path has led to acts of loving kindness.5Anniversaries of the Buddha’s lifeThe festival of Vesak and how different aspects of the Buddha’s life is celebrated across South East Asia.6Recap and practiceAn opportunity to recap the learning in the first five lessons. Inclusion of some examination style questions and a return to the key concepts7DenominationsHow Buddhim travelled from Indian to Sri Lanka etc.How the vehicles were created and the differences between denominations.8Theravada - practices and festivalsPractices and festivals in South East Asia such as Songkran and Vesak9Mahayana - practices and festivalsPractices and festivals in China such as Parinirvana Day10Vajrayana - practices and festivalsPractices and festivals in Tibet. The purpose of Bardo Thodal11Transmission of Buddhism to the west and modern practicesStudents own personal experiences of BuddhismElements of studies so far within modern EnglandHow eastern ideas came to the west from the Theosophical society of Madame Blavatsky in the 19th CenturyBuddhist traditions in the west (such as mindfulness)12RevisionRecap of key content explored in the unit13Deliberate practiceDeliberate practice of key words and quotations from the unit Specific explanations of the meaning of key words and the meaning of quotations.KS3- Non-religious worldviews, philosophy and ethicsLesson Core contentLesson content1Scientific views on origins of the universe Big bang theory as the majority viewGod particleFirst cause argument and criticism2Scientific views on origins of humanityEvolutionThe selfish geneThe design argument and criticisms3History of AtheismEnlightenment and epistemology20th century development of atheismScepticism4HumanismHow humanism has developedReferences to origins of the universe5Understanding of religion in sociologyMarx and God as a social construct6Understanding of religion in psychologyFreud - religion as wish fulfillmentJung - religion as collective unconscious7What is ethics?Relativism and absolutismIntroduce thought experiments8UtilitarianismWhat is utilitarianismApplication of utilitarianism to Jim and the indiansStrengths and weaknesses9Kantian ethicsRecognition that Kant’s religious beliefs are unclearRule based approach to ethicsApplication to ‘Nazi at the door’Strengths and weaknesses10Modern virtue ethicsElizabeth Anscombe / Phillipa foot Modern virtue ethicsApplication to the trolley problem11Non-religious approaches to equalityFeminist perspectives on societyIssues of race in society12RevisionRecap of key content explored in the unit13Deliberate practiceDeliberate practice of key words and quotations from the unit Specific explanations of the meaning of key words and the meaning of quotations.KS4- Islamic beliefs and teachingsLesson Core contentLesson content1Abrahamic originsStory of Ibrahim, Ishmael, Sarah and HagarThe influence this has had on the origins of Islam2MuhammadStory of Muhammad and revelation of the Qur’anThe influence this has had on the origins of Islam3Sunni/Shi’a splitThe emergence of Islam after the death of MuhammadKey similarities and differences between the denominationsThe emergence of different types of leaders (caliph/Imams)The key beliefs of Sunni (six articles) and Shi’a (five roots)4TawhidThe beliefs contained with Tawhid (first, whole, greatest)The influence this will have on the life of a Muslim5AngelsThe role of angels in creationNames and roles of particular angels (Jibril, Israfil, Azrael, Raqib & Atid, Mika’il, Maalik)The differences in Sunni and Shi’a views of angels6Recap and practiceAn opportunity to recap the learning in the first five lessons. Inclusion of some examination style questions and a return to the key concepts.7ProphetsThe role of prophets (leaders of community, receive revelation, perfect examples for others).The role of particular prophets (Adam, Ibrahim, Musa, Dawud, Isa)The importance of Muhammad as the final prophet8Imamate (Shi’a Islam)The emergence of the ImamateThe attributes of the ImamsThe difference between prophets and Imams9Holy BooksThe importance of holy books (Scrolls of Ibrahim, Tawrat, Zabur, Injil)The difference between those revelations and the revelation of the Qur’anWhat the Qur’an is and what the Qur’an contains10AfterlifeThe different stages of afterlife (life, at death, barzakh, day of judgement, after the day of judgement)Beliefs about Jannah and JahannamImportance of this life for an afterlife11PredestinationConcept of predestinationDifferences in Sunni/Shi’a views on predestinationInfluence this has on the life of a Muslim12RevisionRecap of key content explored in the unit13Exam practiceSpecific focus on answering examination questions from the unit.Will be inclusive of different examination boards as much as possible14Deliberate practiceDeliberate practice of key words and quotations from the unit Specific explanations of the meaning of key words and the meaning of quotations.KS4- Islamic practicesLesson Core contentLesson content1ShahadahIntroduction to the five pillars of IslamDeclaration of faith and key beliefs contained within the ShahadahImpact on the life of a Muslim: how is this shown in practice?2Salah (lesson 1)Role of prayer in the life of a MuslimRequirement to pray 5 times a day and Sunni/Shi’a differences in practiceDifferent types of prayer (obligatory, optional etc.)3Salah (lesson 2)Specific focus on public vs private prayer. Jumu’ah and Du’a Preparation for prayer (wudu)4ZakahThe role of ZakahCalculation of ZakahWho Zakah is given toKhums in Shi’a Islam5SawmThe requirement to fast during the month of RamadanOther obligations alongside fastingImportance of fasting 6Recap and practiceAn opportunity to recap the learning in the first five lessons. Inclusion of some examination style questions and a return to the key concepts.7Hajj (lesson 1)The meaning behind the rituals of Hajj (recap of story of Hagar, Ishmael, Ibrahim and Sarah)8Hajj (lesson 2)The rituals of Hajj (Mecca, Mina, Muzdalifah, Arafat, Jamarat, Id-ul-Adha etc.)9Ten obligatory actsFocus on the 10 obligatory acts of Shi’a IslamWhy Shi’a Muslims have additional acts alongside the five pillars10JihadThe importance of jihad for the life of a MuslimGreater and lesser jihad11FestivalsOrigins of festivalsId-ul-FitrId-ul-AdhaAshura (both Sunni and Shi’a)12RevisionRecap of key content explored in the unit13Exam practiceSpecific focus on answering examination questions from the unit.Will be inclusive of different examination boards as much as possible14Deliberate practiceDeliberate practice of key words and quotations from the unit Specific explanations of the meaning of key words and the meaning of quotations.KS4- Christian beliefs and teachingsLesson Core contentLesson Content1The nature of GodQualities of God, eternal, creator, transcendentTrinity2Creation Genesis 1-2Origins of the universe (Gen 1)Origins of humanity (Gen 2)3The incarnation and Jesus as the son of GodNativity storyJesus as God incarnate4Life of JesusJesus restoring the relationship with God through his teachings, miracles and actions5The CrucifixionThe events of Holy Week6Recap and practiceAn opportunity to recap the learning in the first five lessons. Inclusion of some examination style questions and a return to the key concepts.7The ResurrectionThe Resurrection accountsJesus conquering death8Sin and SalvationHow Jesus’ work addresses human sin and enables salvation9AtonementHow Jesus’ work brings God and humans into right relationship10JudgementDifferent views on judgement; faith, works, faith and works11Heaven, Hell and PurgatoryDifferent views on the afterlifeSymbolic interpretations of a spiritual resurrectionLiteral interpretations of a physical resurrection12RevisionRevision of key concepts13Exam practiceApplying knowledge to examination style questions14Deliberate practiceDeliberate practice of key quotations and key termsUnderstanding the meaning of key quotationsKS4- Christian practicesLesson Core contentLesson content1WorshipPrayerLiturgicalNon-liturgical2BaptismInfant baptism (Anglican and Roman Catholic)Adult baptism (Baptist and free church)3Eucharist Transubstantiation and Roman Catholic practice‘Real presence’ and Anglican practiceRemembrance meal and Baptist practice4PilgrimageRoman Catholic (Lourdes)Ecumenical (Taize)5FestivalsChristmasEaster6Recap and practiceAn opportunity to recap the learning in the first five lessons. Inclusion of some examination style questions and a return to the key concepts.7Church in the local communityCharities (Trussell Trust, Street Pastors)Church outreach (toddler groups, soup kitchens etc)8Growth of churchEvangelism and the Great Commission in the local communityOverseas Mission and links to the world wide churchSpecific reference to the world-wide Anglican communion9Responses to persecutionFacts and figures on Christian persecutionChristian responses to persecution10ReconciliationThe Church’s work of reconciliation with specific ref to Coventry Cathedral11Responses to worldwide povertyFacts and figures on world wide povertyInternational aid (Christian Aid)12RevisionRevision of key concepts13Examination practiceApplying knowledge to examination style questions14Deliberate practiceDeliberate practice of key quotations and key termsUnderstanding the meaning of key quotationsKS4- Relationships and familiesLesson Core contentLesson content1Nature and purpose of familiesChristian and Islamic views on the purpose of familyThe family as the basis of societyThe family as protection for vulnerable members of societyTypes of family including nuclear, extended, reconstituted, single parent2Nature and purpose of marriageIslamic and Christian views of marriageMarriage vowsMarriage as a context for sexual relationshipsTraditional views on heterosexual marriage, monogamy and polygamy3DivorceReasons for divorceChristian views on divorce and remarriage including Roman Catholic, AnglicanSituation EthicsIslamic views on divorce and remarriagenon-religious views in reference to utilitarianism4Sex outside of marriageSex before marriageAdulteryIslamic and Christian viewsNon-religious views in reference to utilitarianism5Attitudes towards sexualityHistorical development of views on same sex attraction in the UK to modern dayChristian teachings on same sex attraction and relationshipsIslamic teachings on same sex attraction and relationshipsNon-religious views (utilitarianism)6Recap and practiceAn opportunity to recap the learning in the first five lessons. Inclusion of some examination style questions and a return to the key concepts.7Same-sex marriageThe development of the law in the UK regarding civil partnerships and same sex marriageChristian and Islamic views on same sex marriage with reference to the purpose of marriage8CohabitationRecap of purpose of marriage and sex outside of marriageCurrent trends in the UK towards cohabitationIslamic, Christian and non-religious views9ContraceptionTypes of contraceptionRoman Catholic views on artificial contraceptionOther Christian views on contraceptionIslamic viewsNon-religious (utilitarianism)10Contemporary family issuesViews on same-sex parentingCare for the elderly and vulnerable in societyViews on trans issues11Gender equalityExamples of gender discriminationTraditional Islamic and Christian views on roles of men and womenModern Islamic and Christian views on the roles of men and women12RevisionRevision of key concepts13Exam practiceApplying knowledge to examination style questions14Deliberate practiceDeliberate practice of key quotations and key termsUnderstanding the meaning of key quotationsKS4- Matters of life and deathLesson Core contentLesson content1Origins of the universe (Christianity)The Biblical creation narrativeInterpretations of the creation narrative, liberal, conservative, fundamentalistThe Big Bang theoryIntro to non-religious views (utilitarianism) which will be referenced throughout2Origins of the universe (Islam)The origins of the universe according to the Qur’anTraditional and modern interpretations3Environmental issuesIssues such as pollution, climate breakdown, deforestation etcChristian and Islamic views on stewardship and responses.4Origins of humanity (Christianity)Origins of humanity in the BibleInterpretations of the origins of humanity, liberal, conservative, fundamentalistEvolution5Origins of humanity (Islam)Origins of humanity in the Qur’anTraditional and modern interpretations6Recap and practiceAn opportunity to recap the learning in the first five lessons. Inclusion of some examination style questions and a return to the key concepts.7Treatment of animals (animal testing)Cosmetic and medical testing on animalsChristian and Islamic views on stewardship of animalsNon-religious views (utilitarianism)8Treatment of animals (food)Issues around intensive and free range farmingHalal food lawsChristian views on using animals for foodNon religious views (application of utilitarianism)9AbortionReasons for abortionLaw on abortionChristian views (situation ethics, sanctity of life)Islamic views (lesser of two evils, command not to kill)Non-religious views (utilitarianism)10EuthanasiaReasons for EuthanasiaLaw on EuthanasiaChristian views (situation ethics, sanctity of life) Islamic views (Command not to kill, predestination)Non-religious views (utilitarianism)11Death and afterlifeThe impact of beliefs regarding death and the afterlife on Islamic and Christian responses to ethical issues.Non-religious views12RevisionRevision of key concepts13Exam practiceApplying knowledge to examination style questions14Deliberate practiceDeliberate practice of key quotations and key termsUnderstanding the meaning of key quotationsKS4- Peace and conflictLesson Core contentLesson content1Peace, justice, forgiveness, reconciliationChristian and Muslim views on these four concepts and the relationship between them2Violent and nonviolent protestProtest laws in the UKCase study: London riots 2011Christian views about violent and nonviolent protestIslamic views about violent and nonviolent protest3TerrorismTerrorism as a form of violent protestChristian and Islamic views on terrorismHow scripture can be misinterpreted to fit with terrorist ideology4Reasons for warGreed, self-defence and retaliation as reasons for warChristian and Islamic responses to reasons for war5Just war theory (Christianity)Aquinas’ just war theoryCase study: can wars be just? Falklands/WWII6Just war theory (Islam)Jihad and just war theoryMuslim attitudes to conduct in war7Recap and practiceAn opportunity to recap the learning in the first six lessons. Inclusion of some examination style questions and a return to the key concepts.8Holy warHistory of Holy War in Christianity (Crusades, warfare in the Old Testament)Holy War in Islam with links to lesser jihad (example of the Battle of Badr)9Nuclear weapons and WMD’sExamples of WMDS and the use of nuclear weapons at Hiroshima and NagasakiWMDs in reference to Just War theory and lesser jihad10PacifismPacifism in ChristianityPacifism in Islam with a focus on peace and self defence11Responses to victims of warThe effects of war (environmental, physical, emotional)Islamic and Christian teachings directed at helping victims of warCharities (Islamic Relief, Christian Aid)12RevisionRecap of key content explored in the unit13Exam practiceSpecific focus on answering examination questions from the unit.Will be inclusive of different examination boards as much as possible14Deliberate practiceDeliberate practice of key words and quotations from the unit Specific explanations of the meaning of key words and the meaning of quotations.KS4- Crime and punishmentLesson Core contentLesson content1Crime and punishment in the UKLaw in the UKTreatment of criminals in the UKGood and evil and intentions and actions2Reasons for crimeChristian, Muslim and non-religious views on reasons for crime (hatred, greed, addiction, upbringing, mental illness, opposition to unjust laws, poverty).3Shari’ahWhat is Shari’ah?Categories of Islamic lawCategories of crime4Lawbreakers and types of crime (Christianity)Christian attitude to those who break the lawSpecific Christian teachings on murder, theft and hate crimes5Lawbreakers and types of crime (Islam)Islamic attitude to those who break the lawSpecific Islamic teachings on murder, theft and hate crimes6Crimes as a cause of sufferingAttitude to suffering in Christianity and IslamCase study: Charleston Church shooting7Recap and practiceAn opportunity to recap the learning in the first six lessons. Inclusion of some examination style questions and a return to the key concepts.8Aims of punishmentRetribution, deterrence, reformationChristian, Muslim and non-religious responses to these aims of punishment9Attitudes to treatment of criminalsHow criminals should be punished with reference to prison, community service and corporal punishment.Christian, Muslim and non-religious views on these punishments10ForgivenessChristian attitudes towards forgivenessCase study: Maureen GreavesIslamic attitudes towards forgivenessCase study: forgiving a violent criminal11Death penaltyMethods of executionChristian, Muslim and non-religious responses to the death penalty12RevisionRecap of key content explored in the unit13Examination practiceSpecific focus on answering examination questions from the unit.Will be inclusive of different examination boards as much as possible14Deliberate practiceDeliberate practice of key words and quotations from the unit Specific explanations of the meaning of key words and the meaning of quotations.KS4- Human rightsLesson Core contentLesson content1Social justice and human rightsConcept of social justiceHuman rightsResponsibility2Prejudice and discriminationConcepts of prejudice and discriminationPrejudice and discrimination in the UKGenderSexuality3Prejudice and discrimination based on disabilityChristian views on prejudice and discrimination based on disabilityIslamic views on prejudice and discrimination based on disabilityCase study: Sally Phillips (has a son with Down’s syndrome)The role of positive discrimination4Prejudice and discrimination based on raceChristian and Muslim views on prejudice and discrimination based on race (Martin Luther King, Jesus’ teachings, Muhammad’s teachings)Case study: the murder of Anthony WalkerThe role of positive discrimination5Religious freedom and CensorshipReligious freedom in the UK: including British background to freedom of religionChristian teachings on freedom of religionIslamic teachings on freedom of religionCensorship6Recap and practiceAn opportunity to recap the learning in the first five lessons. Inclusion of some examination style questions and a return to the key concepts.7Status of women in ChristianityChristian views on the roles of womenIssues surrounding female ordinationCase study: Libby Lane8Status of women in IslamIslamic views on the roles of womenWomen and worshipTreatment of womenUse of hijab (impact of culture)9Poverty and its causes (Exploitation of the poor)Problem of povertyResponsibility of those living in povertyExploitation: situation in BritainFair paypeople trafficking10Giving money to the poorGiving aid (long and short term)Charity (tithe in Christianity, Zakah and Khums in Islam)Charities that help the poor (Muslim Hands, Christian Aid)11Attitudes to wealth (e.g gambling)Christian teachings on wealth (Old and New Testament)Islamic teachings on wealthyThe use of wealthInterest on loans in IslamAttitudes to gambling12RevisionRecap of key content explored in the unit13Examination practiceSpecific focus on answering examination questions from the unit.Will be inclusive of different examination boards as much as possible14Deliberate practiceDeliberate practice of key words and quotations from the unit Specific explanations of the meaning of key words and the meaning of quotations.KS4- Standalone lessonsLesson Core content1Structuring ‘explain’ questions2Structuring ‘discuss/evaluate’ questions3Interpreting beliefs and teachings ‘discuss/evaluate’ questions4Interpreting thematic ‘discuss/evaluate’ questions ................
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