Austin ISD

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Lesson Name: Myths: Context Clues and Theme Estimated timeframe: See Pacing Suggestions

3rd 9Wks/Unit 6/ARC 1 5th Grade

This lesson is appropriate for both Dual Language and Monolingual teachers.

Dual Language Pacing: Day 1 – Engage and Beginning of SE Focus Lesson 1(Teacher Model)

Day 2 – Finish SE Focus Lesson 1(Teacher Model) and Partners do Activity 1

Day 3 – SE Focus Lesson 2 (Teacher Model)

Day 4 – Finish Activity 1

Day 5 – Activity 2 and Teacher Leads Closure Discussion

Monolingual Pacing: Day 1 – Engage and SE Focus Lesson 1(Teacher Model) and Activity 1

Day 2 - SE Focus Lesson 2 (Teacher Model) and Activity 1

Day 3 -Activity 2 Teacher Leads Closure Discussion

|Lesson Components |

|Lesson Objectives: Students will use context clues’ strategies to determine unknown words, and a graphic organizer to compare and contrast the |

|themes of myths. |

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|Language Objectives: The students will use academic language to discuss the meanings of unknown words and use the text to draw conclusions about|

|the theme. |

|Prior Learning: Students can understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the theme and elements of fictional text and provide |

|evidence from the text to support their understanding. |

|Standards(Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills: |

|5.2 Reading/ Vocabulary Development. Students understand new vocabulary and use it when reading and writing. Students are expected to: |

|2 (B) use context (e.g. in –sentence restatement) to determine or clarify the meaning of unfamiliar or multiple meaning words. |

|5.3 Reading/ Comprehension of Literary Text/ Theme and Genre. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about theme and genre in |

|different cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are |

|expected to: |

|3 (A) compare and contrast the themes or moral lessons of several works of fiction from various cultures. |

|3 (B) describe the phenomena explained in origin myths from various cultures. |

|College and Career Readiness: |

|Locate explicit textual information, draw complex inferences, and analyze and evaluate the information within and across texts of varying |

|lengths. |

|Identify, analyze, and evaluate similarities and differences in how multiple texts present information, argue a position, or relate a theme. |

|Draw and support complex inferences from text to summarize and draw conclusions. |

|Understand new vocabulary and concepts and use them accurately in reading, speaking, and writing. |

|Identify new words and concepts acquired through study of their relationships to other words and concepts. Draw and support complex inferences |

|from text to summarize and draw conclusions. |

|Describe, analyze, and evaluate information within and across literary and other texts from a variety of cultures and historical periods |

|Analyze themes, structures, and elements of myths, traditional narratives, and classical and contemporary literature. |

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|Essential Questions: |

|How do certain words help my understanding of what I read? |

|How can we determine word meanings from context? |

|How are the themes or moral lessons in myths alike and different? |

|Vocabulary |Essential: myth, context clues, synonyms, antonyms, theme |

| |Chart Paper |

|Lesson |Types of Context Clues handout (attached at end of lesson) |

|Preparation |Triple Venn Diagram Graphic Organizer (attached at end of lesson) |

| |Suggested Texts: |

| |Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People's Ears by Verna Aardema  |

| |Pandora by Robert Burleigh |

| |The Hero and the Minotaur by Robert Byrd |

| |King Midas: The Golden Touch by Demi |

| |Greek Gods and Goddesses by Geraldine McCaughreen |

| |Persephone by Sally Clayton Pomme |

| |Piecing Earth and Sky Together by Nancy Raines Day |

| |Storm Boy by Paul Owen Lewis |

| |Moon Mother by Ed Young |

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| |Some websites that have Greek Myths: , , |

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|Anchors of Support | |

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|Differentiation |For the individual/ pair work, be sure to have plenty of books available for the range of independent reading levels of your|

|Strategies |students (addressing readers below, on, and above grade level). |

|Keep in mind that |Special Education: If needed, read the student-selected story to/with them and allow them to verbalize their responses |

|differentiation does |while you write them; Incorporate picture clues into the graphic organizer to help clarify each component; Allow for |

|not discriminate. : )|cooperative learning opportunities (pair them strategically). |

|These strategies |English Language Learners: Define the terms on the anchor chart and/or provide picture clues to match the vocabulary. Allow|

|often cross over to |for cooperative learning opportunities. |

|meet multiple student|Extension for Learning: Have the students evaluate the changes Disney made to the myth of "Hercules using this Read Write |

|needs- use your | lesson found here: |

|knowledge and | |

|understanding of your| |

|students as a guide. | |

|21st Century Skills |Work Creatively with Others: Develop, implement and communicate new ideas to others effectively |

|[pic] |In groups, have students create a Theme Song based on a myth’s theme or message |

| |Students can use Audacity () or Voicethread |

| |( applications) to record and present their songs. |

|English Language Proficiency Standards: Mandated by Texas Administrative Code (19 TAC §74.4), click on the link for English Language Proficiency |

|Standards (ELPS) to support English Language Learners. |

|Lesson Cycle |

|Engage |Begin by dividing students into groups of 3, 4, or 5. |

| |Give each group a Tier 2 or 3 vocabulary word. (Depending on how the students are grouped, differentiate the |

| |words by giving the group a word based on their academic levels.) |

| |Using the Drama Based Instruction Strategy- Stage Picture, have each group create a frozen image or scene to |

| |describe that word. More information about this strategy can be found here: |

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| |Have each student in the group come in one at a time to create their vocabulary word picture, encouraging |

| |students to try and guess the word before all the students in the Stage Picture create their vocabulary word |

| |scene-with as few clues as possible. |

| |The student groups take turns trying to guess each other’s vocabulary words based on the context clues in their |

| |Stage pictures. |

| |Lead the class in a discussion using these questions: |

| |How did the Stage Pictures help describe the meaning of the words? |

| |Why did some words need more clues than others? |

| |How did each student in the Stage picture provide clues to the word meaning? |

| |Make the connection with students that the vocabulary stage pictures the groups made are similar to context clues|

| |surrounding unknown words to readers. Just like the frozen poses they made as a group; the context clues provide |

| |ways to help us infer the meaning of words. |

|Lesson Stages |SE Focus Lesson 1: (Teacher-led/ Whole Group) |

| |Ask students what “context clues” are. Remind them that some authors "leak" information on the page and that it |

| |sometimes requires detective work to "solve" word meanings. Remind students also that context clues are helpful |

| |for learning new words and better understanding what they read. |

| |Prepare students to work as detectives, using clues to figure out what an unfamiliar word means. Introduce the |

| |LPR3 mnemonic as a useful aid for figuring out unknown words from context. (This LPR3 mnemonic would make a great|

| |anchor chart) |

| |Look- before, at, and after the new word. |

| |Predict- quickly predict the word's meaning, remembering that a wrong prediction is often a good start. |

| |Reason- think more carefully about the word's meaning, trying to be as precise as the context clues permit. |

| |Resolve- recognize that you may need to take other steps (e.g., look it up, ask someone). |

| |Redo- go through the steps again if necessary. |

| |Share a high-interest myth (that you have read in advance to plan for stopping points and open-ended questions.) |

| |Either have copies available for the students, or display under a document camera. |

| |In advance, locate several Tier 2 and/or 3 vocabulary words within the text. |

| |Model the LPR3 strategy with a vocabulary from the myth read aloud. For example: “Model through a think-aloud |

| |process the LPR3 mnemonic to solve the meaning of the word incoherent as follows in this sentence: "Billy's reply|

| |was incoherent. First, I need to look before, at, and after the unfamiliar word incoherent. Then I need |

| |to predict what the word might mean by substituting other words that could make sense in the sentence, |

| |like funny, stupid, clever, or wrong. When I try to reason or look more closely at the context, all I know is |

| |that incoherent is being used to describe Billy's reply. I think I need more help to resolve the meaning of this |

| |word." Next write the following sentence on the board or overhead: “Due to a severe lack of sleep and extreme |

| |nervousness, Billy's reply was incoherent. “Think aloud while modeling the LPR3 mnemonic again. "When I look this|

| |time, there are no words after incoherent, but I can figure out a lot from what's before the word. I'm going |

| |to predict that it means ‘does not make any sense.' My reason is that it says ‘severe lack of sleep and extreme |

| |nervousness.' I think I can resolve the meaning based on this context because I know what it's like when I'm |

| |overtired and nervous." Discuss as a class how the context clues in the sentence and the LPR3 mnemonic helped to |

| |solve the meaning of the word incoherent. |

| |Have students practice this strategy in pairs or table groups through a guided practice using Think-Pair-Share as|

| |you continue the read aloud. |

| |Share with students Types of Context Clues handout (attached at end of lesson). Hopefully your students are |

| |familiar with these types of context clues from previous lessons in other grade levels. |

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| |ACTIVITY 1: (Student Partners) |

| |Have students work with their partners to write two sentences, each exemplifying one of the types of context |

| |clues just introduced. Have dictionaries and thesauri available or encourage students to access the online |

| |versions at and . |

| |Take time at the end of the session for pairs to share their sentences with other pairs or the whole class. |

| |Collect the sentences and check for understanding. |

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| |SE Focus Lesson 2: (Teacher-led/ Whole Group) |

| |Review the myth read aloud from SE Focus Lesson 1 |

| |Instruct a volunteer to define the word "myth" using a dictionary and discuss its meaning. Tell students that a |

| |myth is a kind of story which attempts to interpret some aspect of the world around us, often times expressing |

| |its culture's moral values in human terms. Help students identify characteristics in the story that are unique to|

| |mythical literature. Ask students the following inferential questions: |

| |What is being interpreted in this story? |

| |Is the interpretation real or scientifically based? Why or why not? |

| |What moral value or theme is being addressed in this story? |

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| |Review with students what the theme of a story is, and have them come up with the theme from the SE Focus Lesson |

| |1 Read-Aloud. Students can Think-Pair-Share to come up with a theme. |

| |Share with students a Triple Venn Diagram (attached at end of lesson). Explain to students that we will compare |

| |and contrast 3 myths-their story elements and theme. Three myths that will lend well to this lesson are these |

| |Greek myths: "Daedalus and Icarus," "Bellerophon and Pegasus," and "Helios and Phaethon." (See Lesson Preparation|

| |for websites to find these myths) |

| |Share a high-interest myth that (read in advance to plan for stopping points and open-ended questions.) Either |

| |have copies available for the students or display under a document camera. |

| |After reading, together as a whole group fill in the first two large circles of the Venn Diagram on chart paper |

| |and their own graphic organizer, comparing and contrasting the story elements and theme of the first two myths. |

| |Use these questions to guide the discussion: |

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| |What is being interpreted in this story? |

| |Is the interpretation real or scientifically based? Why or why not? |

| |What moral value or theme is being addressed in this story? |

| |How are these myths the same? Different? |

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| |ACTIVITY 1: (Student Partners) |

| |Have student pairs read the last myth together. Have them work on the Triple Venn Diagram collaboratively to |

| |complete one graphic organizer. |

| |After the partner groups have finished their work, have them team up with another partner group to share the |

| |information they recorded. Guide the students to have productive discussions about any discrepancies they may |

| |find between their graphic organizer and the other partners’ information. |

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| |ACTIVITY 2: (Student Partners) |

| |In their Reader’s Response Journal’s or Write to Learn Journal have the students respond to this question from |

| |the myths from SE Focus Lesson 1 or 2: |

| |Are there any connections between the themes of the myths? How do you know? Or |

| |What reading skills did you use to "solve" unknown words using context clues? |

|Closure Activity |Discussion: |

| |Lead students through a discussion about what strategies helped them to identify the meaning of the unknown words|

| |and themes of the myths. Revisit and discuss the Essential Questions (beginning of lesson guide). |

|Check for Understanding |Formative: Teacher observations during Turn and Talk and partner activities, and journal reflections. |

|(Evaluation) | |

|[pic] |Journal Writing Reflection: (Writing to Learn Journal) |

| |Are there any connections between the themes of the myths? How do you know? Or What reading skills did you use to|

| |"solve" unknown words using context clues? |

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| |Summative: |

| |Have students independently find the meanings of unknown words in their independent books, journaling what |

| |context clues helped them or using the LPR3 method, and the theme of the story. |

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