English 102 English Composition/Introduction to Literature

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English 102 English Composition/Introduction to Literature Spring 2016

Instructor: P. Roberts Office hours: M-F by appointment

Office: Room 203 email: proberts.sh@ccboe.us

I. Course description (catalogue):

3 credit hours. Prerequisite: EH101. Spelling, grammar, punctuation, vocabulary, and the strategies of effective writing. Introduction to literature. Research paper.

II. Objectives

SDE rules/objectives applicable to this course: 1.a.1; 1.a.2; 1.a.3; 1.a.4; 1.b.8; 1.b.11. Education majors passing this course fulfill the SDE objectives designated.

A. To develop skills in the writing of compositions based upon reading and interpreting literary genres

B. To develop skills in grammar, spelling, vocabulary, and mechanics for effective writing

C. To develop organizational skills necessary for correct, clear writing

D. To become familiar with three basic genres—short story, poetry, and drama—in American, British, and world literatures

E. To learn the proper procedure for developing the simple research paper

F. To learn significant literary terms

III. Requirements and evaluation

A. Class attendance: Students are allowed only three unexcused absences. English Department attendance policy also requires students to attend 75% of all class meetings.

B. Class requirements: The assignments for the course include the following:

1. Six in-class essays based on the literature studied (100 points each)

2. A research paper (300 points)

3. Three major tests (one each on the short story, poetry, and drama) designed to measure fulfillment of the course objectives. These tests will include both objective and essay questions. (100 points each)

4. A final examination (100 points)

5. Daily work such as pop quizzes, journals, and participation (daily work cannot be made up) (100 to 200 points)

C. Grading: A, B, C, and NC. NC is given if the writing skills required for subsequent college work have not been

mastered.

IV. Texts and materials

A. The Bedford Introduction to Literature: Reading, Thinking, Writing. 10th Edition. Edited by Michael Meyer. ISBN: 978-1-4576-0827-8.

B. The New McGraw-Hill Handbook.3rd edition.. By Elaine P. Maimon, Janice H. Peritz, Kathleen Blake Yancey. ISBN: 978-0-07-739730-2

C. A red folder with pockets (at the end of the semester, all major work completed for this course will be resubmitted in this folder)

D. A good dictionary and thesaurus are suggested.

V. Attendance Policy

Attendance will be taken at the beginning of class. Students are allowed only three unexcused absences. After an absence, the student should pick up a form, complete it, include documentation, and return it to the instructor who will approve or reject the excuse. This policy begins with the first class session. A student with four or more unexcused absences will receive no credit (NC). Tardiness is unacceptable, and each tardy will count as ½ an unexcused absence. In addition to this freshman attendance policy, students in EH 102 must follow the English Department’s overall attendance policy, which requires students to be present at 75% of class meetings. Not all material discussed in class is in the textbook. Students are responsible for getting the missed lecture notes from another student. The student is also responsible for arranging to make up any missed assignments due to an excused absence. Any absence on the dates of exams will result in a grade of 0 unless prior arrangements are made with the instructor.

VI. Grading Policy

Any assignment turned in late (for ANY reason, including excused absences) will be assessed a 10% reduction in points per day. Assignments more than one day late will not be accepted and a grade of 0 will be given. Only one late assignment will be allowed. No extra credit assignments will be allowed. Grades for the class will be A (100-90), B (89-80), or C (79-70); scores of 69 or below will result in no credit (NC) for the class. The NC does not affect a student's college grade point or quality point averages.  (For purposes of this class, the term late refers to after the tardy bell rings for class on the date the assignment is due.)

Though this course contains no formal instruction in grammar and mechanics, grammar and mechanics will be considered in the grading of essays, tests, and the final draft of the research paper. Carefully proofread all work before submitting it. I may ask you to see me for a conference if I notice in your work recurring problems with grammar and/or mechanics. The following is a list of some basic errors. Any work which contains repeated instances of these may receive NC.

1. Problems with grammar and mechanics

2. Problems with spelling, typographical errors, and format

3. Inadequate statement and/or development of thesis

4. Inadequate or illogical paragraphing

5. Lack of clear organizational pattern

6. Lack of unity and coherence of ideas

7. Problems concerning style and rhetoric

VII. Classroom Behavior

All students are expected to attend class fully prepared with appropriate materials. Any student behavior deemed disruptive by the instructor will result in expulsion of the student from the classroom, with an absence for the day and possible disciplinary action. CELL PHONES WILL NOT BE USED IN CLASS WITHOUT PERMISSION.  

VIII. Academic Honesty

Students who are found guilty of cheating (receiving, providing, talking, aiding in any form, and/or not following teacher’s specific instructions) will receive a “0” on the material or test. No credit for plagiarism of any sort. This includes claiming material as your own from any other source (student, teacher, book, magazine, Internet, etc). All students involved in copying will receive no credit for the work.

IX. Disabilities Accommodation Act

Any individual who qualifies for reasonable accommodations under The Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 should contact the instructor immediately.  

SHORT STORY

• Define forty short story terms from chapters 1-21.

• Keep a literary glossary journal and answer at least one question at the end of the stories listed below. The question should address one of the literary terms you defined.

• Read

• Chapter 1 "Reading Fiction," Chapter 2 "Writing About Fiction," Chapter 10 "Combining the Elements of Fiction: A Writing Process;" Read the short stories "How to Tell a True War Story" by Tim O'Brien,"Videotape" by Don DeLillo ()

• Chapter 3 Plot: Stephen King “All That You Love Will Be Carried Away” () , Andre Dubus "Killings"

• Chapter 4 Character: May-lee Chai “Saving Sourdi”

• Chapter 5 Setting: Ernest Hemingway "Soldier's Home"

• Chapter 6 Point of View: Anton Chekhov "The Lady with the Pet Dog," Joyce Carol Oates "The Lady with the Pet Dog," Alice Walker "Roselily" ()

• Chapter 7 Symbolism: Colette "The Hand," Ralph Ellison "Battle Royal," Chktra Banerjee Divakaruni "Clothes" (.)

• Chapter 8 Theme: Stephen Crane "The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky," Katherine Mansfield “Miss Brill”

• Chapter 9 Style, Tone, and Irony: Raymond Carver "Popular Mechanics," Matt Groening “Life in Hell”

• Chapter 11-20: Flannery O'Connor "Good Country People,” William Faulkner "Barn Burning," James Joyce "Eveline," T. Coraghessan Boyle “Carnal Knowledge, Gabriel Garcia Marquez ()

Write

• Literary Analysis Essay 1

• Literary Analysis Essay 2

Test

• Short Story Exam

POETRY

• Define forty poetry terms.

• Keep a literary glossary journal and answer at least one question at the end of the stories listed below. The question should address one of the literary terms you defined.

• Read

• Chapter 22 "Reading Poetry," Chapter 23 "Writing About Poetry," Chapter 32 "Combining the Elements of Poetry: A Writing Process"

• Chapter 24 "Word Choice, Word Order, and Tone"

• Chapter 25 "Images"

• Chapter 26 "Figures of Speech"

• Chapter 27 "Symbol, Allegory, and Irony"

• Chapter 28 "Sounds"

• Chapter 29 "Patterns of Rhythm"

• Chapter 30 "Poetic Forms"

• Chapter 31 "Open Form"

Write

• Literary Analysis Essay 3

• Literary Analysis Essay 4

Test

• Poetry Exam

DRAMA

• Define drama terms.

• Keep a literary glossary journal and answer at least one question at the end of the stories listed below. The question should address one of the literary terms you defined.

• Read

• Chapter 47 "Reading Drama," Chapter 48 "Writing about Drama"

• Robert E. Lee & Jerome Lawrence Inherit the Wind

• Chapter 49 Sophocles Oedipus Rex

• Chapter 50 William Shakespeare Macbeth

• Chapter 51 Modern Drama Inherit the Wind

Write

• Literary Analysis Essay 5

• Literary Analysis Essay 6

Test

• Drama Exam

JANUARY

6: Introduction to Course; Introduce research paper

7:

8: Chapters 1, 2, and 10 notes and discussion: Forty short story terms due.

11: Chapter 3 Plot: Stephen King “All That You Love Will Be Carried Away” (); Andre Dubus "Killings"

12: Research paper working “thesis” due.

13: Chapter 4 Character: May-lee Chai "Saving Sourdi," Chapter 5 Setting: Ernest Hemingway "Soldier's Home"

14: LITERARY ANALYSIS ESSAY 1 DUE.

15: Chapter 6 Point of View: Anton Chekhov "The Lady with the Pet Dog," Joyce Carol Oates "The Lady with the Pet Dog,” Alice Walker "Roselily" ()

18: Holiday

19: Chapter 7 Symbolism: Colette "The Hand," Ralph Ellison "Battle Royal," and Chktra Banerjee Divakaruni "Clothes" (.)

20: Chapter 8 Theme: Stephen Crane "The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky," Katherine Mansfield “Miss Brill”

21: LITERARY ANALYSIS ESSAY 2 DUE.

22: Chapter 9 Style, Tone, and Irony: Raymond Carver "Popular Mechanics,” Matt Groening “Life in Hell,” Chapter 11-20: Flannery O'Connor "Good Country People,” William Faulkner "Barn Burning"

25: Chapter 11-20: James Joyce "Eveline," Gabriel Garcia Marquez "One of These Days"

()

26: Research paper outline due.

27: SHORT STORY EXAM. LG RESPONSE JOURNAL DUE.

28:

29: Chapter 22 "Reading Poetry," Chapter 23 "Writing About Poetry," Chapter 32 "Combining the Elements of Poetry: A Writing Process"

FEBRUARY

1 Chapter 24 “Word Choice, Word Order, and Tone”

2: Forty poetry terms due.

3: Chapter 25 “Images”; Chapter 26 “Figures of Speech”

4: LITERARY ANALYSIS ESSAY 3 DUE.

5: Chapter 27 “Symbol, Allegory, and Irony”; Chapter 28 “Sounds”

8: Chapter 29 “Patterns of Rhythm”

9:

10: Chapter 30 “Poetic Forms”; Chapter 31 “Open Form”

11: LITERARY ANALYSIS ESSAY 4 DUE.

12: POETRY EXAM. LG RESPONSE JOURNAL DUE.

15: Holiday

16: Chapter 47: “Reading Drama”; Chapter 48: “Writing about Drama”; Chapter 50: “A Study of William Shakespeare” Drama terms due.

17: Macbeth

18:

19:

22:

23:

24:

25: LITERARY ANALYSIS ESSAY 5 DUE.

26:

29:

MARCH

1:

2: Chapter 49: “A Study of Sophocles” Oedipus Rex

3:

4:

7: RESEARCH PAPER DRAFT 1 DUE (optional).

8:

9:

10: LITERARY ANALYSIS 6 DUE.

11:

14: Chapter 51 “Modern Drama” Inherit the Wind

15:

16:

17:

18:

21:

22: RESEARCH PAPER DRAFT 2 DUE (optional).

23:

24:

25: DRAMA EXAM. LG RESPONSE JOURNAL DUE.

3/28 – 4/1: SPRING BREAK

APRIL

4:

5:

6:

7:

8:

11: RESEARCH PAPER FINAL DUE.

12:

13:

14:

15:

18:

19:

20:

21:

22: FINAL EXAM

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