DOT/FAA/AR-97/7 Advanced Pavement Design: Finite Element ...

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´╗┐DOT/FAA/AR-97/7

Office of Aviation Research Washington, D.C. 20591

Advanced Pavement Design: Finite Element Modeling for Rigid Pavement Joints, Report II: Model Development

March 1998 Final Report

This document is available to the U.S. public through the National Technical Information Service (NTIS), Springfield, Virginia 22161.

U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Aviation Administration

NOTICE

This document is disseminated under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Transportation in the interest of information exchange. The United States Government assumes no liability for the contents or use thereof. The United States Government does not endorse products or manufacturers. Trade or manufacturer's names appear herein solely because they are considered essential to the objective of this report.

DOT/FAA/AR-97/7

ADVANCED PAVEMENT DESIGN: FINITE ELEMENT MODELING FOR RIGID PAVEMENT JOINTS, REPORT II: MODEL DEVELOPMENT

March 1998

Michael I. Hammons

U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station 3909 Halls Ferry Road Vicksburg, MS 39180-6199

U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Aviation Administration Office of Aviation Research Washington, DC 20591

FAA William J. Hughes Technical Center COTR is Xioagong Lee

DTFA03-94-X-00010

Final Report

AAR-410

The contribution of a cement-stabilized base course to the strength of the rigid pavement structure is poorly understood. The objective of this research was to obtain data on the response of the rigid pavement slab-joint-foundation system by conducting laboratory-scale experiments on jointed rigid pavement models and to develop a comprehensive three-dimensional (3D) finite element model of the rigid pavement slab-joint-foundation system that can be implemented in the advanced pavement design concepts currently under development by the Federal Aviation Administration. Evidence from experiments conducted on six laboratory-scale jointed rigid pavement models suggests that the joint efficiency depends upon the presence and condition of a stabilized base. The presence of cracking in the base and the degree of bonding between the slabs and the stabilized base course influence the structural capacity and load transfer capability of the rigid pavement structure. The finite element model developed in this research indicates that a comprehensive 3D finite element modeling technique provides a rational approach to modeling the structural response of the jointed rigid airport pavement system. Modeling features which are required include explicit 3D modeling of the slab continua, load transfer capability at the joint (modeled springs between the slabs), explicit 3D modeling of the base course continua, aggregate interlock capability across the cracks in the base course (again, modeled by springs across the crack), and contact interaction between the slabs and base course. The contact interaction model feature must allow gaps to open between the slab and base. Furthermore, where the slabs and base are in contact, transfer of shear stresses across the interface via friction should be modeled.

Aggregate interlock Finite elements

Contact

Friction

Dowels

Joints

Unclassified

Rigid pavements Stabilized bases

This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service (NTIS), Springfield, VA 22161.

Unclassified

180

PREFACE The research reported herein was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Airport Technology Branch under Interagency Agreement DTFA03-94-X-00010 by the Airfields and Pavements Division (APD), Geotechnical Laboratory (GL), U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES), Vicksburg, Mississippi. Dr. Xiaogong Lee, Airport Technology Branch, FAA, was the technical monitor. Dr. Satish Agrawal is Manager, Airport Technology Branch, FAA. This study was conducted under the general supervision of Dr. W. F. Marcuson III, Director, GL, and Dr. Raymond S. Rollings, Acting Chief, APD. This report was prepared under the direct supervision of Mr. T. W. Vollor, Chief, Materials Analysis Branch (MAB), APD. The project principal investigator was Mr. Michael I. Hammons, MAB. This report was written by Mr. Hammons. The assistance of Dr. Don Banks, Acting Assistant Director, GL, is gratefully acknowledged. The Director of WES during the preparation of this publication was Dr. Robert W. Whalin. The Commander and Deputy Director was Colonel Bruce K. Howard, EN.

iii/iv

CONTENTS

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1 INTRODUCTION

1.1 Background

1.2 Objective

1.3 Scope

2 FINITE ELEMENT CODE DESCRIPTION

2.1 Background

2.2 Isoparametric Element Considerations

2.3 Element Descriptions

2.3.1 2D Element Descriptions

2.3.2 3D Element Descriptions

3 SINGLE-SLAB RESPONSE AND SENSITIVITY STUDIES

3.1 Background

3.2 Example Problems for Sensitivity Studies

3.2.1 Interior Load Case I

3.2.2 Interior Load Case II

3.2.3 Interior Load Case III

3.2.4 Edge Load Case I

3.2.5 Edge Load Case II

3.3 Response and Sensitivity Study Results

3.3.1 Interior Load Case I

3.3.2 Interior Load Case II

3.3.3 Interior Load Case III

3.3.4 Edge Load Case I

3.3.5 Edge Load Case II

4 JOINTED SLABS-ON-GRADE MODEL

4.1 Background

4.2 Representation of Joint Stiffness

4.3 Example Problem

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