ROMAN FOOD & DINING

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ROMAN FOOD & DINING

|Food and Dining 1 |

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|Short and light - like a Roman breakfast! |

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|Food and Dining 2 |

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|Good account of the typical daily meals Romans had; with pictures and links to various establishments in Pompeii where locals |

|could go for food. |

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|Food and Dining 3 |

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|The types of food, and how it was cooked, boiled or baked and the various cooking implements used. |

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|Roman Food - Bread, Dormice, Figs, Pigs and more... |

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|Just some of the Roman foodstuffs preserved at and around Pompeii. |

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|Roman Food - Peacock Mosaic |

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|Scroll down to see this wonderful mosaic from Roman Tunisia. |

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|Roman Food - Peacock Wall-painting 1 |

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|As featured on p.21 of CLC Bk.I. From area round Vesuvius; now in the National Archaeological Museum in Naples . |

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|Roman Food - Peacock Wall-painting 2 |

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|Wall-painting from the villa at Oplontis, near Pompeii. |

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|Roman Food - Bread Wall-painting |

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|While this is usually described as showing the sale of bread, it seems more likely to depict a handout ("dole") of free bread to|

|the needy by a toga-clad citizen hoping for some favours in return!The fresco, now in the Archaeological Museum in Naples |

|originally came from the tablinus of House VII.3.30 in Pompeii which adjoins the "Bakery of Sotericus". The toga-clad citizen |

|dling out the freebies was thus probably the owner of the house and bakery. |

|The web-page also has a brief description about this important staple. |

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|Roman Food - Figs Wall-painting |

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|Wall-painting of a basket of figs from the villa at Oplontis, near Pompeii; as featured on p.25 of CLC Book I. And here is a |

|modern copy. |

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|Roman Food - Pomegranates Wall-painting |

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|Fresco of a basket of pomegranates from the villa at Oplontis, near Pompeii. |

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|Roman Food - Eggs |

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|2000-year-old eggs from Pompeii; as shown on p.25. |

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|Roman Food - Eggs & Birds Wall-painting |

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|Wall-painting from the House of Julia Felix in Pompeii. |

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|Roman Food - Fish Mosaic |

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|The Romans enjoyed seafood, and this famous mosaic from Pompeii depicts many of their favourite delicacies including octopus, |

|lobster, eel, squid, prawn, bass, skate and red mullet. In the Archaeological Museum, Naples; a detail appears on p.25. |

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|Roman Food - Rabbit Wall-painting |

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|Wall-painting from the House of the Vettii in Pompeii. |

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|Roman Food - Rabbit Mosaic |

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|Once decorating a bedroom floor in the "House of the Dolphins" in Thysdrus (modern El Djem in Tunisia), it is now in the local |

|museum. |

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|Roman Food - Deer Wall-painting |

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|This fresco fragment from a villa near Pompeii shows two kitchen slaves gut a small deer. |

|From a villa near Pompeii; now on display in the Getty Villa, Malibu, USA. |

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|Roman Food - Flamingo Mosaic |

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|Proof of the Romans' taste for exotic foods - an oven-ready pink flamingo from Roman Tunisia! |

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|Roman Food Critics 1: Pliny |

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|The Roman senator and famous letter-writer Pliny the Younger complains about snobbish behaviour at some Roman dinners where the |

|host serves different quality food to his guests depending on their status. |

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|Roman Food Critics 2: Martial |

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|The Roman poet Martial promises his friend a good meal... |

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|Roman Kitchen 1 |

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|The original Roman cooking range and pots from the House of the Vettii in Pompeii. Food was cooked on the top surface which |

|would have had hot charcoal on it; the hole beneath was not an oven but for storing wood. |

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|Roman Kitchen 2 |

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|Modern replica of a Roman kitchen with stove, tables and cooking pots. |

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|Roman Kitchen 3 |

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|Great drawing recreating a working Roman kitchen. |

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|Roman Kitchen 4 |

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|Another morsel of information... |

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|Roman Dining-room 1 |

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|Reconstruction of the dining-room (Triclinium) in the House of the Fruit Orchard in Pompeii. Here, in addition, is a 360-degree |

|view of the original room and its reconstruction; and a fantastic fly-by movie around this house. |

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|Roman Dining-room 2 |

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|Good reconstruction drawing of a Roman dinner with guests reclining on three couches. |

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|Roman Dining-room 3 |

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|Roman wall-painting depicting guests at a banquet. |

|From the House of Chaste Lovers in Pompeii. |

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|Roman Dining-room 4: the Seating-plan |

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|A diagram of how the tables and guests were arranged in the dining-room. |

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|Roman Drink - Wine Shop |

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|In Herculaneum, famous for its well-preserved wooden wine rack still holding the wine jars. |

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|Roman Tableware 1 |

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|The most prestigious tableware was made from silver, not gold; Vestorius Priscus wanted everyone to know that he had been rich |

|enough to afford silver dinner utensils - so they were painted on his tomb in Pompeii. |

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|Roman Tableware 2 |

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|One of the best sets of Roman tableware ever found! Discovered in the 1960's at the Roman town of Augusta Raurica near Basel in |

|Switzerland. |

|Its discovery was a bit bizarre... among others, a schoolboy had found an ornate rectangular dish, and presented it to his |

|teacher, who ridiculed his claims that it was Roman and ordered him to throw it away. The priceless platter was recovered from |

|the school bin! Here's the full story. |

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|Roman Pepper Pot |

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|A very rare find... and it's from Britain! |

|Pepper was first imported into the Roman world from India in the first century AD. Now in the British Museum. |

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|Roman Recipes 1 |

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|From this homepage you can select ready prepared menus, and then look at individual recipes for various courses. |

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|Roman Recipes 2 |

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|Practical recipes for Roman dishes to spice up your next dinner party. |

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|Modern Recipe - |

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|Use dry ice or jelly (jello in the US) to create your own Pompeian masterpiece! |

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