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Science Curriculum Guide1257300288925O’Fallon Township High Schoolupdated October 2011Table of ContentsOTHS Science Department Mission3OTHS Science Department Learning Goal3OTHS Science Curriculum Overview4OTHS Science Courses5OTHS Physical Science Course Curriculum Guides6Physical/Earth Science7Geology 112Chemistry 118Honors Chemistry 125Chemistry 233Honors Chemistry 238Physics 142Physics 247Honors Physics 149Honors Physics 254OTHS Life Science Course Curriculum Guides 58Biology 159Honors Biology 165Honors Biology 271Integrated Life Science76Environmental Science81Human Anatomy & Physiology85Illinois Learning Standards for Science89Goal 11 – Inquiry and Design90Goal 12 – Concepts and Principles92Goal 13 – Science, Technology and Society96OTHS Science Department Mission StatementThe mission of the O’Fallon Township High School Science Department is to maximize student understanding of the fundamental principles and the interconnectedness of life, physical, and earth sciences through inquiry-based learning, and to create awareness in students of the relationships between science, technology, and society through practical applications. OTHS Science Learning GoalThe 2011-2012 OTHS Science Department Learning Goal is to develop science literacy skills in students to serve as the foundation for improving scientific reasoning, problem solving, and analytical research skills - including but not limited to the construction and analysis of graphs and data tables. OTHS Science Curriculum OverviewThe O’Fallon Township High School science curriculum offers a variety of courses designed to meet the needs of all students. Students are required to complete two years of science by the end of their junior year. The two required years of science must include one life science course and one physical science course. After meeting this requirement, students are encouraged to take additional science courses. Because of the large number of science course offerings and options, there is no particular course “sequence” for taking science courses. Students should consult their science teachers and guidance counselors to determine best program for them.Many OTHS science courses have prerequisites. These prerequisites are included in the course curriculum guides in this document, as well as in the OTHS course catalog available through the guidance department.OTHS Science CoursesFirst Year Science CoursesLife Science Courses:Biology 1, Honors Biology 1Physical Science Courses: Physical/Earth ScienceSecond Year Science CoursesLife Science Courses: Biology 1, Honors Biology 1, Integrated Life Science, Environmental SciencePhysical Science Courses: Physical/Earth Science, Geology 1, Chemistry 1, Honors Chemistry 1, Physics 1, Honors Physics 1Additional Science CoursesThese courses may be taken after meeting the two-year science requirement, assuming other prerequisites are met.Life Science Courses: Biology 1, Integrated Life Science, Environmental Science, Human Anatomy & Physiology, Honors Biology 2Physical Science Courses: Physical/Earth Science, Geology 1, Chemistry 1, Honors Chemistry 1, Chemistry 2, Honors Chemistry 2, Physics 1, Physics 2, Honors Physics 1, Honors Physics 2OTHS Physical Science Courses – Curriculum GuidesPhysical/Earth Science7Geology 112Chemistry 118Honors Chemistry 125Chemistry 233Honors Chemistry 238Physics 142Physics 247Honors Physics 149Honors Physics 254Course:Physical/Earth ScienceCourse Description: Physical/Earth Science is a course designed to give introductory students an understanding of basic Physical Science concepts. The topics of motion, energy and matter will be taught and reinforced by analyzing the interaction of these concepts with Earth Science. The Earth Science concepts of planetary systems, weather and physical processes will be related to current events and information along with the relationship humans have with the environment. Lab work will be inquiry based and used to reinforce the concepts presented in class. This framework will create a comprehensive understanding of and appreciation for the physical workings of the Earth.Prerequisites: NoneTextbook:Physical Science with Earth Science; Feather, McLaughlin, Thompson and Zike; Glencoe, 2006Grading Scale: 97 & above A+, 96-93 A, 92-90 A-, 89-87 B+, 86-83 B, 82-80 B-, 79-77 C+, 76-73 C, 72-70 C-, 69-67 D+, 66-63 D, 62-60 D-, 59-0 FCourse Outline:Unit 1 – The Nature of Science (Chapters 1 – 2) – 10 daysILS:11.A.4a, 4b, 4c, 4d, 4e, 4f13.A.4a, 4b, 4cThe Methods of Science (1.1, pp. 6 – 13)Standards of Measurement (1.2, pp. 14 – 21)Communicating with Graphs (1.3, pp. 22 – 26)Labs/Activities:Graphing Activity, 3-Hole Bottle, Lipid Lab, Measurement labUnit 2 – Motion (Chapter 3 and 4) - 20 DaysILS:11.A.4a, 4b, 4c, 4d, 4e, 4f12.D.4a13.A.4aDescribing Motion (3.1, pp. 70 – 75)Acceleration (3.2, pp. 76 – 80)Motion and Forces (3.3, pp. 81 – 86)The First Two Laws of Motion (4.1, pp. 98 – 103)Gravity (4.2, pp. 104 – 111)The Third Law of Motion (4.3, pp. 113 – 117)Labs/Activities:Tennis Ball Motion Lab, Design a Parachute Lab, Virtual Projectile Lab, Friction Predictions Lab, Collision Lab, Water Rocket Lab Zoom-Zoom Capstone LabUnit 3 – The Solar System (Chapter 7 and 8) – 20 DaysILS:11.A.4a, 4b, 4c, 4d, 4e, 4f12.F.4a13.A.4aEarth in Space (7.1, pp.187 – 189)Time and Seasons (7.2, pp. 190 – 195)Earth’s Moon (7.3, pp. 197 – 207)Planet Motion (8.1, pp. 218 – 222)The Inner Planets (8.2, pp. 223 – 229)The Outer Planets (8.3, pp. 231 – 237)Labs/Activities:Season Cycler Activity, Demonstrating Eclipses Activity, “If We Had No Moon” Video, Apollo 13 Video, Solar System Machine Tape Model Project, Create an Alien ProjectUnit 4 – Energy in Motion (Chapters 9 – 11) – 30 DaysILS: 11.A.4a, 4b, 4c, 4d, 4e, 4f12.C.4a13.A.4aTemperature and Thermal Energy (9.1, pp. 254 – 259)States of Matter (9.2, pp. 260 – 265)Transferring Thermal Energy (9.3, pp. 266 – 270)Using Thermal Energy (9.4, pp. 272 – 277)The Nature of Waves (10.1, pp. 288 - 293)Wave Properties (10.2, pp. 294 – 299)Behavior of Waves (10.3, pp. 301 – 309)Sound (11.1, pp.320 – 326)Reflection and Refraction of Light (11.2, pp. 327 – 330)Mirrors, Lenses and the Eye (11.3, pp. 331 – 337)Labs/Activities: Virtual Insulation Lab, Food Energy Lab, Specific Heat Lab, Ice Cream Lab, Build a Speaker Lab, Light and Color Demos, Spectral Tube Demos, Start ID ActivityUnit 5 – Electromagnetic Radiation (Chapter 15) – 12 DaysILS:11.A.4a, 4b, 4c, 4d, 4e, 4f12.C.4a13.A.4aWhat are Electromagnetic Waves? (15.1, pp. 456 – 461) The Electromagnetic Spectrum (15.2, pp. 462 – 467)Radio Communication (15.3, pp. 469 – 475)Labs/Activities:Radio Lab, Sell Your Wave Project, Super Hero LabUnit 6 – Energy Sources (Chapter 16) – 10 DaysILS:11.A.4a, 4b, 4c, 4d, 4e, 4f12.C.4a13.A.4aFossil Fuels (16.1, pp. 486 – 493)Nuclear Energy (16.2, pp. 494 – 500)Renewable Energy Sources (16.3, pp. 501 – 506)Labs/Activities:Build a Power Plant Project, Alternate Fuels Webquest, Build a Better Chimney LabUnit 7 – Earth’s Processes (Chapter 12 and 17) – 22 DaysILS:11.A.4a, 4b, 4c, 4d, 4e, 4f12.E.4a, 4b13.A.4aEvolution of Earth’s Crust (12.1, pp. 354 – 361)2.Earthquakes (12.2, pp. 362 – 369)3.Earth’s Interior (12.3, pp. 370 – 372)4.Volcanoes (12.4, pp. 373 – 378)Labs/Activities:Continental Drift/Pangaea Activity, Plate Tectonics Webquest, Earthquake Epicenter Activity, Tsunami Video, Where’s the Quake Activity, Ocean Floor Map Activity, Internet Volcano Activity, Super Volcano VideoUnit 8 – Matter and Interaction of Matter (Chapters 18, 19, 22 and 23) – 40 daysILS:11.A.4a, 4b, 4c, 4d, 4e, 4f12.C.4b12.D.4b13.A.4aComposition of Matter (18.1, pp. 552 – 558)Properties of Matter (18.2, pp. 560 – 567)Structure of the Atom (19.1, pp. 578 – 583)Masses of Atoms (19.2, pp. 584 – 587)The Periodic Table (19.3, pp. 588 – 596)Stability in Bonding (22.1, pp. 688 – 692)Types of Bonds (22.2, pp. 694 – 702)Writing Formulas and Naming Compounds (22.3, pp. 703 – 709)Chemical Changes (23.1, pp. 720 – 725)Chemical Equations (23.2, pp. 726 – 729)Classifying Chemical Reactions (23.3, pp. 730 – 733)Labs/Activities:PT Scavenger Hunt, Adopt and Element Project, Alien PT Activity, Chromatography Lab, Conductivity Lab, 5 Solution Lab, Rock Candy lab, Classification Lab, Rate of Reaction labUnit 9 – Weather and Climate (Chapters 17) – 12 daysILS:11.A.4a, 4b, 4c, 4d, 4e, 4f12.E.4a, 513.A.4c, Ed 1.Earth’s Atmosphere (17.1, pp. 518 – 522) 2.Weather (17.2, pp. 524 – 528) 3.Climate (17.3, pp. 529 – 534) 4.Earth’s Changing Climates (17.4, pp. 534 – 539)Labs/Activities:Drought and Flood Video, Anatomy of a Tornado Video, Weather Map Activities, Katrina Gulf VideoUnit 10 – Stars and Galaxies (Chapter 26) – 14 daysILS: 11.A.4a, 4b, 4c, 4d, 4e, 4f12.F. 4a, 5a, 4b, 5b13.A. 4c. 5c1.Observing the Universe (26.1, pp. 818-822)2.Evolution of Stars (26.2, pp. 823-829)3.Galaxies and the Milky Way (26.3, pp. 831-835)4.Cosmology (26.4, pp. 836-839)Labs/Activities:How Many Stars Activity, Future of Milky Way Video, Universal Expansion Activity, Space Travel Video, “Contact” showingCourse:Geology ICourse Description: Geology I is designed for average science students who have an interest in the earth and earth processes. The course will focus on four general areas of study: Earth Materials, Interpretation of the Earth’s Surface, Physical Geology, and Earth’s History. The course has been designed to be a hands-on, activity centered course with the teacher supplying background information. During the course, the students will use various techniques (specimen study, maps, geo morph models, field studies, etc.) to reinforce information about geologic principles. Geology is a full year physical science course. Students will receive ? credit per semester.Prerequisites: Successful completion of a first year life science course and be a sophomore or above.Textbook: The Dynamic Earth: An Introduction to Physical Geology, 5th edition, Skinner; Wiley, 2004Grading Scale: 97 & above A+, 96-93 A, 92-90 A-, 89-87 B+, 86-83 B, 82-80 B-, 79-77 C+, 76-73 C, 72-70 C-, 69-67 D+, 66-63 D, 62-60 D-, 59-0 FCourse Outline:Unit 1 – Introduction to Geology – 8 daysILS:11.A.4b, 4c, 5a, 5c12.E. 4b, 513 A. 4b, 4c, 5b13 B. 4c, 5a, 5bFundamental Laws of GeologyFundamental Concepts of GeologyPrimary Geology Scientists Basic Geological Terms and DefinitionsHistory of Early GeologyLabs/Activities: Geology Survey, Practical Geology, Building Basic Geological ConceptsUnit 2 – Minerals – 21 daysILS:12.C.5b13.B. 4b, 4c, 4d, 5b, 5eMineral Forming EnvironmentsMineral GroupsPhysical Properties of MineralsMineral IdentificationCommon Rock Forming MineralsMineral Resources Influence of Mineral Resources on Man’s HistoryEarth’s Energy SourcesLabs/Activities: Rock or Mineral?, Mineral Forming Environments, Physical Properties of Minerals, Mineral Identification, Mineral Crystallization, Mineral Sleuth, Mineral Slam, Mineral Guess Who?Unit 3 – Rocks – 22 daysILS:12.C.5b12.E. 4b13.B. 4b, 4c, 4d, 5b, 5eRock CategoriesRock Textures as Identifying PropertiesRocks Composition and HistoryIgneous RocksSedimentary RocksMetamorphic RocksRock CycleLabs/Activities: Rocks, Rocks, and More Rocks, Igneous Textures, Igneous Identification, Sedimentary Identification, Metamorphic Identification, Rock Detective, Rock and RollUnit 4 – Caving – 5 daysILS:Groundwater FeaturesKarst TopographyLand SubsidenceEnvironmental ConsequencesCaving TechniqueGeologic Structures in Southern IllinoisLabs/Activities: Mysteries Underground, Field Study in Illinois CavernsUnit 5 – Historical Geology – 19 daysILS:11.A.5a12.E.4b, 513 A.4b, 4c, 5b, 5c, 5dFoundations of Historical GeologyAbsolute and Relative TimeGeological UnconformitiesShoreline Changes Rock Layer InterpretationGeologic CorrelationFacies ChangeWalther’s LawRock SymbolsRock Stratigraphic UnitsStratigraphic SequencingLabs/Activities: Unconformity Identification, Ordering Geologic Events Set 1, 2, 3, Shoreline Changes and Rock Columns, Historical Geology Bingo, Geologic Time Table and Organism Classification Unit 6 – Mapping – 30 daysILS: 12.E.4a, 4b, 513.A.4a, 4c, 4d13.B.4b, 4c, 4dContour Map Basics – symbols, elevation, bench marks, contour line shapes and land featuresTopographic MapsU.S.G.S. topographic mapsTopographic Map Profiles or Cross SectionsUses for Topographic MapsGeologic Map InterpretationMaking Aerial PhotographsInterpreting Aerial PhotographsLabs/Activities: Maps, Maps, and More Maps, Latitude, Longitude, and all that Good Stuff, Reviewing Map Basics, Interpreting Contour Liners, Contour Map Profiles, Designing Contour Maps, Map Basics on USGS Topographic Maps, Interpreting Contour Lines on USGS Topographic Maps, USGS Topographic Profiles, Geologic Map Interpretation, Aerial Stereo PhotographsUnit 7 – Earth’s Interior – 4 daysILS: 12.C.4a13.A.4c, 5dLayers of the Earth Composition of the EarthLabs/Activities: Diagramming the Earth’s InteriorUnit 8 – Plate Tectonics – 16 days ILS:12.E.4a, 5a13.A.4c, 4d, 5b, 5c, 5d Historical BackgroundDevelopment of Present TheoryDifferent Types of Plate BoundariesTopographic Features Created from Plate BoundariesGeography and Plate TectonicsRock Types Produced at Different Plate BoundariesLabs/Activities: Fossils as Clues to Ancient Continents, Movement of the Pacific Ocean Floor, How did the North Atlantic Form, Geography of Plate Tectonics, Earth’s Dynamic Crust, Plate Boundary DiagramsUnit 9 – Earthquakes – 10 daysILS: 11.B.4d, 4e, 4f, 4g, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 5e12.C.4a12.E.4a, 4b, 513.B.4c, 4d, 4e1.Earthquake Origins2.Effects of Earthquakes3.Detection and Location of the Epicenter4.Earthquake Measurement5.Earthquake Prediction6.Reducing Earthquake Impact7.Earthquake ControlLabs/Activities: Plate Boundaries and Earthquake Prediction, Seismic Waves, Earthquakes and Plate Boundaries, Alaskan EpicenterUnit 10 – Volcanoes – 12 daysILS:11.B.4d, 4e, 4f, 4g, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 5e12.C.4a12.E.4a, 4b, 513.B.4c, 4d, 4eEruptions of MagmaVolcanic ProductsIntrusive or Plutonic FeaturesExtrusive or Volcanic StructuresFeatures in Volcanic RocksLive Cycle of a VolcanoDestructive Volcanoes in Recorded HistoryLabs/Activities: Igneous Rock Review, Plutonic and Volcanic Features, Volcanoes: Where and Why?, The Blast of Mt. St. Helen’s, Volcanoes and Igneous Rocks, Plate Tectonics, Volcanoes, and Geography, Mt. PinatuboUnit 11 – Mountain Building – 19 daysILS:12.E.4a, 4b, 513.B.4c, 4d, 4eStructural Forces which Create MountainsFaults and FoldsBasic Mountain TypesMajor Mountain Regions of the WorldMountains of the Future Labs/Activities: Folds, Faults, and Mountains, Geoblox Interpretation, Geoblox Creation of Folds and Faults, Mountain Building Internet Research, Clay Motion, Geoblox Creation and Data Collection, Mountain BingoUnit 12 – Groundwater – 8 daysILS:11.A.5a12.C.4a, 5a12.E.513.B.4c, 4d, 4e, 5cWater CycleSources of GroundwaterGeology of GroundwaterGroundwater ErosionGroundwater BenefitsGroundwater ProblemsGroundwater as a Natural ResourceLabs/Activities: Hole-e-Rocks, Groundwater Features, Spill Site Assessment, Flood of 1993Unit 13 – Geologic Time – 4 daysILS:12.E.4b, 5Eras, Periods and Epochs of Geologic Time Table Major Geologic Events and TimeMajor Life Events and TimeDating of Rock LayerLabs/Activities: Geologic Time Table Scavenger Hunt, Geologic Time Mix n’Match, Plotting Geologic Time in One Calendar Year, Geologic Time Bingo, Go Dig Course: Chemistry 1Course Description: Chemistry 1 is a one year course dealing with the study of matter, its forms, and changes. It is a highly recommended college preparatory course. The Chemistry 1 curriculum is structured to enhance students’ problem solving skills. Areas covered include matter, atomic structures, equations, mass relationships, solution chemistry and qualitative analysis. A significant amount of class time will be spent performing laboratory activities designed to reinforce these concepts. These activities are also designed to improve critical thinking and science reasoning skills. A strong mathematics background is critical to student success in this course. Prerequisites: Successful completion of a first year life science course AND Advanced Algebra I with a C or better OR Algebra 1 with an A or instructor consentTextbook: Chemistry: Matter and Change, 1st edition McGraw-Hill Companies, 2005Grading Scale: 97 & above A+, 96-93 A, 92-90 A-, 89-87 B+, 86-83 B, 82-80 B-, 79-77 C+, 76-73 C, 72-70 C-, 69-67 D+, 66-63 D, 62-60 D-, 59-0 FCourse Outline:Unit 1 – Data Analysis (chapters 2) – 22 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d 11.B.5a,5b,5c,5d, 12.C.5b13.A.5a,5c1.Lab Safety 2.Units of Measurement (2.1, pp. 25-30; 50)3.Scientific Notation (2.2, pp. 31-33) 4. Dimensional Analysis (2.2, pp. 34-35)5.Metric Conversion (2.2, pp. 35)6. Accuracy and Precision (2.3, pp.36-38)7.Percent Error (2.2, pp. 37)8.Significant Figures (2.3, pp.38-42)7.Representing Data (2.4, pp.43-44)Labs/Activities: Diagnostic Test, Column Lab, Density of Water Lab, Rainbow Density Lab, Density of Unknown Lab, Alka-seltzer LabUnit 2 – Introduction of Chemistry (chapter 1) – 6 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c, 11.B.5a,5b,5c,5d, 4f 12.C.5b 12.E.513.A.5a,4b,5c13.B.5b1.Observations of Chemistry and Matter (1.1-1.2, pp. 3-9)2. Branches of Chemistry (1.1, pp. 9)3.Scientific Method (1.3, pp. 10-13)4.Scientific Research (1.4, pp. 485-488)Labs/Activities: Analytical Demo, Bubble Lab, Accidental Discovery PowerPoint, Milk Lab, Vegetable Oil LabUnit 3 – Matter- Properties and Changes (chapter 3) –12 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c 11.B.5a, 4f 12.C.5b13.A.5a,5b,5c1.Physical and Chemical Properties of Matter (3.1 pp. 55-57)2. States of Matter (3.1, pp. 58-60)3.Physical and Chemical Changes in Matter (2.3, pp. 31-62)4.Conservation of Mass (3.2, pp. 63-65)5.Mixtures and Separation of Mixtures (3.3, pp. 66-69)6. Elements and Compounds (3.4 pp. 70-74)7. Law of Definite Proportions (3.4 pp.75)8. Law of Multiple Proportions (3.4 pp. 76-77)Labs/Activities: 50/50 Lab, Foil Lab, Chemical Changes Demo Day, Hydrogen Lab, Chromatography Flowers, Chemical Changes LabUnit 4 – The Structure of the Atom (chapter 4) – 9 daysILS: 11.A.5a, 5c, 5d 11.B.5a, 5b, 4f 12.C.5a, 5b13.A.5a13.B.5a, 5b, 5c1.Early Theories of Matter, Democritus and Dalton (4.1, pp. 87-91)2.Discovery of the Electron (4.2, pp. 92-94)3.Discovering the Nuclear Atom (4.2 pp. 94-97)4.Atomic Number(4.3, pp. 98-99)5.Isotopes and Mass Number (4.3, pp. 100-104)6.Radioactivity and Nuclear Chemistry (4.4, pp. 105-107)7.Nanotechnology(4.4, pp. 110)8.Mass Spectrometry (supplemental handout)Labs/Activities: Candium Lab, Oxygen Lab, Unit 5 – Electrons in the Atom (chapter 5) – 15 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d 11.B.5a,5b,5c, 5e, 4f 12.C.4a, 5a, 5b 12.D. 4a, 5b 13.A.5a,5b,5c 13.B.5b1.Wave Nature of Light (5.1, pp. 118-121)2.Particle Nature of Light (5.1, pp. 122-124)3.Electromagnetic Spectrum and Atomic Emissions Spectra (5.1, pp. 125-126)4.Bohr Model of the Atom (5.2, pp. 127-128)5.Quantum Mechanical Model of the Atom (5.2, pp. 129-134)6.Electron Orbitals (5.2, pp. 132-134)7.Ground-State Electron Configuration (5.3, pp.135-136)8.Aufbau Diagram (5.3, pp. 135)9.Orbital Diagram Notation (5.3, pp. 136-139)10.Valence Electrons/ Dot Notation (5.3, pp. 140-141)Labs/Activities: Flame Test Lab, Physics 2000 Computer Lab, Fireworks Webquest, Atomic Emissions DemoUnit 6 – The Mole (chapter 11) – 15 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d 11.B.5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 5e 12.C.5b13.A.5a,5b,5c1.The Mole Concept (11.1, pp. 309-310)2.Converting Moles to Particles (11.1, pp. 311-312)3.Mass to Mole Conversion (11.2, pp. 313-319)4.Volume to Mole Conversion5.Mole Relationships from a Chemical Formula (11.3, pp. 321-327)6.Percent Composition (11.4, pp. 328-330)7.Empirical Formulas (11.4, pp. 331-332)8. Molecular Formulas (11.4, pp. 333-337)9.Formula of a Hydrate (11.5, pp. 328-341)Labs/Activities: Chalk/ Molecule Activity, Percentage Water in a Hydrate Lab, Determination of an Empirical Formula of a Salt Lab, Determination of the Formula for a Hydrate LabUnit 7 – The Periodic Table and Periodic Law (chapter 6) – 5 daysILS: 11.A.4d,5a11.B.4b,4c12.C.5b13.A.4b,4c13.B.5b1.History of the Periodic Table’s Development (6.1, pp. 151-154)2.The Modern Periodic Table (6.1, pp. 154-158)anizing the Elements by Electron Configuration (6.2, pp159-162)4.Atomic Radius Trends (6.3, pp. 163-164)5.Ionic Radius Trends (6.3, pp. 165-166)6.Ionization Energy Trends (6.3, pp. 167-168)7.Electronegativity Trends (6.3, pp. 168-169)Labs/Activities: Graphing/Problem Solving LabUnit 8 – Ionic Bonding (chapter 8) – 10 daysILS: 11.B.5a,5b,5c12.C.5b1.Forming Chemical Bonds (8.1, pp. 211-212)2.Forming Positive and Negative Ions (8.1, pp. 212-214)3.Formation of Ionic Bonds (8.2, pp. 215-216)4. Properties of Ionic Compounds (8.2, pp. 217-220)5.Formulas for Ionic Compounds (8.3, pp. 221-223)6. Formulas for Compounds Containing Polyatomic Ions (8.3, pp. 224-226)7. Naming Ionic Compounds (8.3, pp. 226-227)8. Metallic Bonding (8.4, pp. 228-229)9.Metal Alloys (8.4, pp. 230-231)Labs/Activities: Naming Ionic CompoundsUnit 9 – Covalent Bonding (chapter 9) – 16 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d11.B.4f, 5b,5c,5d,5e12.C.5b13.A.5a,5b,5c1. Forming Covalent Bonds (9.1, pp. 241-242)2. Single Covalent Bonds (9.1, pp. 243-244)3. Multiple Covalent Bonds (9.1, pp. 245-246)4.Sigma and Pi Bonds (9.1, pp. 245)5.Naming Binary Molecules (9.2, pp. 248-249)6. Naming Acids (9.2, pp. 250-251)7. Naming Hydrates (supplemental)8. Structural Formulas (9.3, pp. 252-256)9.Resonance Structures (9.3, pp. 256-257)10.VESPR Models (9.4, pp. 259-260)11.Bond Hybridization (9.4, pp. 261-262)12.Electronegativity Difference and Bond Character (9.5, pp. 263-264)12.Polar Covalent Bonds (9.5, pp. 264-266)14.Properties of Covalent Compounds (9.5, pp. 266-267)Labs/Activities: Naming Acids, Naming Molecules, Making Compound Models, Covalent/Ionic LabUnit 10 – Balancing Chemical Equations (chapter 10) – 13 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d11.B.4f12.C.5b13.A.5a,5b,5c1.Representing Chemical Equations (10.1, pp. 277-278)2.Word Equations (10.1, pp. 278)3. Skeleton Equations (10.1, pp. 279)4. Balancing Chemical Equations (10.1, pp. 280-283)5.Prediction: Synthesis Reactions (10.2, pp. 284)6. Prediction: Combustions Reactions (10.2, pp. 285)7. Prediction: Decomposition Reactions ( 10.2, pp. 286)8.Prediction: Single Replacement Reactions (10.2, pp. 287-289)9.Prediction: Double Replacement Reactions (10.2, pp 290-291)10.Aqueous Solutions (10.3, pp. 292-293)11. Net Ionic Equations (10.3, pp. 293-298)Labs/Activities: Prediction Flash Cards, Net Ionic LabUnit 11 – Redox Reactions (chapter 20, supplemental) – 6 daysILS: 11.B.4c12.C.5a,5b12.D.5b13.A.5a,5c1.Defining Oxidation / Reduction (20.1, pp. 635-638)2.Determining Oxidation Numbers (20.1, pp. 641-643, supplemental)3.Balancing Redox Equations (20.2, pp. 644, supplemental)4.Balancing Redox Net Ionic Equations (20.2, 645, supplemental)5.Balancing Redox Equations with subscripts (20.2, pp.646, supplemental)6.Balancing Redox Half-Reactions (20.3, pp. 650-653, supplemental)Unit 12 – Stoichiometry (supplemental) – 8 daysILS: 11.A.5a, 5b, 5c, 5d 11.B.4f 12.C.5aDefine Stoichiometry (supplemental)Mass-Mass (supplemental)Mass-Particle (supplemental)Mass-Mole (supplemental)Mass-Volume (supplemental)Volume-Particle (supplemental)Limiting Reactants (supplemental)Labs/Activities: Mass-Mole LabUnit 13 – Molarity (supplemental) – 7 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d12.C.5b13.A.5a,5c1.Define Molarity (supplemental)2.Acid/Base Titration (supplemental)Labs/Activities: Acid/Base TitrationUnit 14 – Qualitative Analysis – (supplemental materials) – time remainingILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d11.B.4f12.C.5b13.A.5a,5c1.Overview of Qualitative Analysis2.Group I Ions3.Group II IonsLabs/Activities: Qualitative Analysis LabCourse: Honors Chemistry 1Course Description: Honors Chemistry 1 encompasses all areas of study and laboratory work as Chemistry 1, but with an accelerated level of difficulty and pace. Expanded areas of study including acid-base equilibria and gas laws require the student to have a much greater depth in problem solving ability and higher mathematical skills. Students will receive ? credit per semester.Prerequisites: Successful completion of a first year life science course AND Honors Algebra I or Honors Geometry with a B or betterTextbook: Chemistry: Matter and Change, 1st edition McGraw-Hill Companies, 2005Grading Scale: 97 & above A+, 96-93 A, 92-90 A-, 89-87 B+, 86-83 B, 82-80 B-, 79-77 C+, 76-73 C, 72-70 C-, 69-67 D+, 66-63 D, 62-60 D-, 59-0 FCourse Outline:Unit 1 – Data Analysis (Chapter 2) – 15 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d 11.B.5a,5b,5c,5d, 12.C.5b13.A.5a,5c1.Lab Safety 2.Units of Measurement (2.1, pp. 25-30; 50)3.Scientific Notation (2.2, pp. 31-33) 4. Dimensional Analysis (2.2, pp. 34-35)5.Metric Conversion (2.2, pp. 35)6. Accuracy and Precision (2.3, pp.36-38)7.Percent Error (2.2, pp. 37)8.Significant Figures (2.3, pp.38-42)7.Representing Data (2.4, pp.43-44)Labs/Activities: Diagnostic Test, Column Lab, Density of Water Lab, Rainbow Density Lab, Alka-seltzer LabUnit 2 – Introduction of Chemistry (Chapter1) – 4 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c, 11.B.5a,5b,5c,5d, 4f 12.C.5b 12.E.513.A.5a,4b,5c13.B.5b1.Observations of Chemistry and Matter (1.1-1.2, pp. 3-9)2. Branches of Chemistry (1.1, pp. 9)3.Scientific Method (1.3, pp. 10-13)4.Scientific Research (1.4, pp. 485-488)Labs/Activities: Bubble Lab, Accidental Discovery PowerPoint, Bunsen Burner Lab, Accuracy & Precision LabUnit 3 – Matter- Properties and Changes (chapter 3) –9 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c 11.B.5a, 4f 12.C.5b13.A.5a,5b,5c1.Physical and Chemical Properties of Matter (3.1 pp. 55-57)2. States of Matter (3.1, pp. 58-60)3.Physical and Chemical Changes in Matter (2.3, pp. 31-62)4.Conservation of Mass (3.2, pp. 63-65)5.Mixtures and Separation of Mixtures (3.3, pp. 66-69)6. Elements and Compounds (3.4 pp. 70-74)7. Law of Definite Proportions (3.4 pp.75)8. Law of Multiple Proportions (3.4 pp. 76-77)Labs/Activities: 50/50 Lab, Foil Lab, Chemical Changes Demo Day, Hydrogen Lab, Chromatography Flowers, Recognizing Chemical Changes Lab, Mystery Mixture LabUnit 4 – The Structure of the Atom (chapter 4) – 7 daysILS: 11.A.5a, 5c, 5d 11.B.5a, 5b, 4f 12.C.5a, 5b13.A.5a13.B.5a, 5b, 5c1.Early Theories of Matter, Democritus and Dalton(4.1, pp. 87-91)2.Discovery of the Electron (4.2, pp. 92-94)3.Discovering the Nuclear Atom (4.2 pp. 94-97)4.Atomic Number(4.3, pp. 98-99)5.Isotopes and Mass Number (4.3, pp. 100-104)6.Radioactivity and Nuclear Chemistry (4.4, pp. 105-107)7.Nanotechnology(4.4, pp. 110)8.Mass Spectrometry (supplemental handout)Labs/Activities: Oxygen LabUnit 5 – Electrons in the Atom (Chapter 5) – 10 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d 11.B.5a,5b,5c, 5e, 4f 12.C.4a, 5a, 5b 12.D. 4a, 5b13.A.5a,5b,5c13.B.5b1.Wave Nature of Light (5.1, pp. 118-121)2.Particle Nature of Light (5.1, pp. 122-124)3.Electromagnetic Spectrum and Atomic Emissions Spectra (5.1, pp. 125-126)4.Bohr Model of the Atom (5.2, pp. 127-128)5.Quantum Mechanical Model of the Atom (5.2, pp. 129-134)6.Electron Orbitals (5.2, pp. 132-134)7.Ground-State Electron Configuration (5.3, pp.135-136)8.Aufbau Diagram (5.3, pp. 135)9.Orbital Diagram Notation (5.3, pp. 136-139)10.Valence Electrons/ Dot Notation (5.3, pp. 140-141)Labs/Activities: Flame Test LabUnit 6 – The Mole (chapter 11) – 11 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d 11.B.5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 5e 12.C.5b13.A.5a,5b,5c1.The Mole Concept (11.1, pp. 309-310)2.Converting Moles to Particles (11.1, pp. 311-312)3.Mass to Mole Conversion (11.2, pp. 313-319)4.Volume to Mole Conversion5.Mole Relationships from a Chemical Formula (11.3, pp. 321-327)6.Percent Composition (11.4, pp. 328-330)7.Empirical Formulas (11.4, pp. 331-332)8. Molecular Formulas (11.4, pp. 333-337)9.Formula of a Hydrate (11.5, pp. 328-341)Labs/Activities: Chalk/ Molecule Activity, Determination of the Formula for a Hydrate Lab, Martian Rock LabUnit 7 – The Periodic Table and Periodic Law (chapter 6) – 4 daysILS: 11.A.4d,5a11.B.4b,4c12.C.5b13.A.4b,4c13.B.5b1.History of the Periodic Table’s Development (6.1, pp. 151-154)2.The Modern Periodic Table (6.1, pp. 154-158)anizing the Elements by Electron Configuration (6.2, pp159-162)4.Atomic Radius Trends (6.3, pp. 163-164)5.Ionic Radius Trends (6.3, pp. 165-166)6.Ionization Energy Trends (6.3, pp. 167-168)7.Electronegativity Trends (6.3, pp. 168-169)Labs/Activities: Movie: The Element Movie, Element Uses ActivitiesUnit 8 – Ionic Bonding (chapter 8) – 5 daysILS: 11.B.5a,5b,5c12.C.5b1.Forming Chemical Bonds (8.1, pp. 211-212)2.Forming Positive and Negative Ions (8.1, pp. 212-214)3.Formation of Ionic Bonds (8.2, pp. 215-216)4. Properties of Ionic Compounds (8.2, pp. 217-220)5.Formulas for Ionic Compounds (8.3, pp. 221-223)6. Formulas for Compounds Containing Polyatomic Ions (8.3, pp. 224-226)7. Naming Ionic Compounds (8.3, pp. 226-227)8. Metallic Bonding (8.4, pp. 228-229)9.Metal Alloys (8.4, pp. 230-231)Labs/Activities: Naming Ionic CompoundsUnit 9 – Covalent Bonding (Chapter 9) – 16 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d11.B.4f, 5b,5c,5d,5e12.C.5b13.A.5a,5b,5c1. Forming Covalent Bonds (9.1, pp. 241-242)2. Single Covalent Bonds (9.1, pp. 243-244)3. Multiple Covalent Bonds (9.1, pp. 245-246)4.Sigma and Pi Bonds (9.1, pp. 245)5.Naming Binary Molecules (9.2, pp. 248-249)6. Naming Acids (9.2, pp. 250-251)7. Naming Hydrates (supplemental)8. Structural Formulas (9.3, pp. 252-256)9.Resonance Structures (9.3, pp. 256-257)10.VESPR Models (9.4, pp. 259-260)11.Bond Hybridization (9.4, pp. 261-262)12.Electronegativity Difference and Bond Character (9.5, pp. 263-264)12.Polar Covalent Bonds (9.5, pp. 264-266)14.Properties of Covalent Compounds (9.5, pp. 266-267)Labs/Activities: Naming Acids, Naming Molecules, Naming Hydrates Lewis Structure Model Game, Covalent and Ionic Bonding—Ceramics Fixative Lab, Movie: The Atom “Bond”Unit 10 – Balancing Chemical Equations (chapter 10) – 13 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d11.B.4f12.C.5b13.A.5a,5b,5c1.Representing Chemical Equations (10.1, pp. 277-278)2.Word Equations (10.1, pp. 278)3. Skeleton Equations (10.1, pp. 279)4. Balancing Chemical Equations (10.1, pp. 280-283)5.Prediction: Synthesis Reactions (10.2, pp. 284)6. Prediction: Combustions Reactions (10.2, pp. 285)7. Prediction: Decomposition Reactions ( 10.2, pp. 286)8.Prediction: Single Replacement Reactions (10.2, pp. 287-289)9.Prediction: Double Replacement Reactions (10.2, pp 290-291)10.Aqueous Solutions (10.3, pp. 292-293)11. Net Ionic Equations (10.3, pp. 293-298)Labs/Activities: Prediction Flash Cards, Kinds of Chemical Reactions Lab, Net Ionic LabUnit 11 – Redox Reactions (Chapter 20, supplemental) – 6 daysILS: 11.B.4c12.C.5a,5b12.D.5b13.A.5a,5c1.Defining Oxidation / Reduction (20.1, pp. 635-638)2.Determining Oxidation Numbers (20.1, pp. 641-643, supplemental)3.Balancing Redox Equations (20.2, pp. 644, supplemental)4.Balancing Redox Net Ionic Equations (20.2, 645, supplemental)5.Balancing Redox Equations with subscripts (20.2, pp.646, supplemental)6.Balancing Redox Half-Reactions (20.3, pp. 650-653, supplemental)Unit 12 – Stoichiometry (chapter 12 & chapter 14 & supplemental) – 6 daysILS: 11.A.5a, 5b, 5c, 5d 11.B.4f 12.C.5aDefine Stoichiometry (12.1, pp. 353 supplemental)Mole-Mass (12.1, pp. 354-357 supplemental)Mass-Mass (12.2, pp361-363 supplemental)Mass-Particle (supplemental)Mass-Volume (14.4, pp 440-443 supplemental)Volume-Particle (14.2, pp 430-4433 supplemental)Limiting Reactants (12.3, pp 364-369 supplemental)Labs/Activities: Mass-Mole LabUnit 13 ? States of Matter & Gases (chapter 13 & chapter 14) ? 12 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d 11.B.5a,5b,5c,5d, 4f 12.C.5b13.A.5a,5c1.Kinetic Molecular Theory (13.1, pp 385-386)2.Graham’s Law of Effusion and Diffusion (13.1, pp 387-388)3.Measuring Pressure & Units for Pressure (13.1, pp 389-390)4.Dalton’s Law of Partial Pressure (13.1, pp 391-392)5.Intermolecular Forces of Attraction (13.2, pp 393-395)6.Density, Fluidity, Viscosity, Surface Tension & Capillary Action in Liquids (13.3, pp 396-399)7.Crystalline Structure of Solids (13.3, pp 399-403)8.Phase Changes & Phase Diagrams (13.4, pp 401-409)bined Changing Conditions Laws (14.1, pp 419-427 supplemental)10.Ideal Gas Laws (14.3, pp 434-438)Labs/Activities: Eudiometer Lab, Balloon/CO2 Lab, Dumas LabUnit 14 – Solutions (chapter15 & supplemental) – 12 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d12.C.5b13.A.5a,5c1.Characteristics of Solutions and Solubility (15.1, pp 453-457)2.Factors Affecting Solubility & Henry’s Law (15.1, pp 458-460)3.Solution Concentration (15.2, pp 462-470)4.Colligative Properties of Solutions (15.3, pp 471-475)5.Heterogeneous Mixtures: Colloids & Suspensions (15.4, pp476-479)6.Sickle Cell Disease—Chemistry and Society (pp 482)Labs/Activities: Solutions Web Quest, Spec-20 Lab Unit 15 ? Acids and Bases (chapter 19) ? 12 daysILS: 11.A 5a, 5b,5c 11.B 5c, 5d 13. A.4a,4b 13. B.5b1.Properties of Acids and Bases and Models/Definitions (19.1, pp 595-598)2.Conjugate Acids and Bases & Amphoteric Properties (19.1, pp 598-599)3.Strengths of Acids and Bases and Ionization Constants (19.2, pp 602-607)4.pH (19.3, pp 608-616)5.Neutralization and Titration (19.4, pp 617-621)Labs/Activities: Acid-Base Titration Unit 16 ? Organic Chemistry (chapter 22 & 23) ? 12 days – as time allowsILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d 11.B.5a,5b,5c,5d, 4f 12.C.5a,5b13.A.5a13.B.5a, anic Chemistry History & Definition (22.1, pp 697-6982.Nomenclature & Structure of Alkanes and Cyclic Alkanes (22.1, pp 698-707)3.Properties of Alkanes (22.2, pp 708-710)4.Nomenclature & Structure of Alkenes & Alkynes (22.3, pp 711-716)5.Hydrocarbon Isomers (22.4, pp 717-721)6.Aromatic Hydrocarbons (22.5, pp 722-724)7.Functional Groups (23.1, pp 737-740)8.Naming Alcohols, Ethers, Amines, Carboxylic Acids, & Esters (23.2 & 23.3, pp 743-751)Labs/Activities: Ester LabUnit 17 ? Nuclear Chemistry (chapter 25) ?as time allowsILS: 11.A.5a,5d 11. B. 5a,5e 12.C.4b 12.C.5b1.Types of Radiation (25.1, pp 806-809)2.Radioactive Decay (25.2, pp 810-812)3.Nuclear Equations (25.2, pp813-814)4.Transmutation (25.3, pp 815-816)5.Decay Rates (25.3, pp 817-820)6.Fission and Fusion (25.4, pp 821-826)7.Biological Effects of Radiation (25.5, pp 827-831)Labs/Activities: Nuclear Website ActivityUnit 18 – Qualitative Analysis – (supplemental materials) – 11 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d11.B.4f12.C.5b13.A.5a,5c1.Overview and Explanation of Qualitative Analysis Lab2.Qualitative Analysis Known Lab Experiment3.Qualitative Analysis Unknown Lab ExperimentLabs/Activities: Qualitative Analysis LabCourse: Chemistry 2Course Description: Chemistry 2 is designed for students who have successfully completed one year of chemistry. It is a continuation of first year chemistry with emphasis on the following concepts: solution chemistry, gas laws, acid-base chemistry, organic chemistry, forensic chemistry, nuclear chemistry, thermal chemistry, and qualitative analysis. Active learning strategies are utilized in all units. Laboratory activities reinforce all topics covered and are a major component of this course. Chemistry 2 is a full year physical science course. Prerequisites: Chemistry 1 with a C or better OR Chemistry 1 teacher consentTextbook: Chemistry, 7th Edition by Zumdahl & Zumdahl, Houghton Miffin Publishing, 2007Grading Scale: 97 & above A+, 96-93 A, 92-90 A-, 89-87 B+, 86-83 B, 82-80 B-, 79-77 C+, 76-73 C, 72-70 C-, 69-67 D+, 66-63 D, 62-60 D-, 59-0 FCourse Outline:Unit 1 – Chemistry 1 Review (chapters 1-3, 5) – 20 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d 11.B.5a,5b,5c,5d,4f 12.C.5b13.A.5a,5c1.Units of Measurement (1.3, pp. 8-10)2.Dimensional Analysis (1.6-1.7, pp. 16-24)3.Significant Figures (1.4-1.5, pp. 10-16) & Scientific Notation (A1.1, pp. A1-A3) 4.Periodic Table (2.7, pp. 55-56)5.Mole Conversions (3.3-3.4, pp. 82-88)6.Calculating Percent Composition (3.5, pp. 89-91)7.Determining Empirical & Molecular Formulas (3.6, pp. 91-96)8.Naming Compounds & Formula Writing (2.8, pp. 57-67)9.Stoichiometry (3.9-3.10, pp. 102-113 & 5.4, pp. 190-194)Labs/Activities: White Powders Lab, Density of CO2 Lab, %Composition of Gum Lab, Gravimetric Determination of Chloride as AgCl Lab, Element Game, Determination of %Iron in OreUnit 2 – Solutions (chapter 11 & chapter 4) – 10 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d 11.B.5a,5b,5c,5d, 4f 12.C.5b13.A.5a,4b,5c1.% Concentration (11.1, pp. 485-488)2.Molarity & Dilutions (4.3, pp. 133-140 & 11.1, pp. 485-488)3.Molality (11.1, pp. 485-488)4.Colligative Properties (11.5, pp. 504-507)Labs/Activities: Ice Cream Lab, Juice Lab, Molarity-Spec 20 Lab, Determining the Molarity of Ni+2 Solutions-Spec 20 Lab Unit 3 – Gas Laws (chapter 5) – 15 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d 11.B.5a,5b,5c,5d, 4f 12.C.5b13.A.5a,5c1.Properties of Gases – Boyles, Charles, Gay-Lussac’s Avogadro’s Laws (5.1-5.2, pp. 178-186)bined Gas Law (5.3, p. 189)3.Ideal Gas Law (5.3, pp. 186-190 & 5.4, pp. 193-194)4.Gas Mixtures & Dalton’s Law of Partial Pressures (5.5, pp. 194-199)5.Kinetic Molecular Theory of Gases (5.6, pp. 199-204)6.Diffusion & Effusion of Gases (5.7, pp. 206-208)7.Real vs. Ideal Gases (5.8-5.9, pp. 208-211)Labs/Activities: Eudiometer Lab, Balloon/CO2 Lab, Dumas Lab, Blimp Webquest, SCUBA Webquest projectUnit 4 – Organic Chemistry (chapter 22) – 25 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d 11.B.5a,5b,5c,5d, 4f 12.C.5a,5b13.A.5a13.B.5a, 5b1.Alkanes, Cycloalkanes & Halocarbons (22.1, pp. 997-1005)2.Alkenes (22.2, pp. 1005-1008)3.Aromatic Hydrocarbons (22.3. pp. 1008-1010)4.Alcohols (22.4, pp. 1010-1013)5.Aldehydes (22.4, pp. 1013-1014)6.Ketones (22.4, pp. 1013-1014)7.Carboxylic Acids (22.3, pp. 1013-1015)8.Esters (22.3, pp. 1013-1015)9.Ethers (supplemental material)10.Amines (22.4, pp. 1015-1016)11.Polymers (22.5, pp. 1016-1025)12.Biochemistry Overview (22.6, pp. 1025-1040)Labs/Activities: Ester Lab. Silly Polymer Lab, Hydrocarbon Lab, Perfume Lab, Polymer Website ActivityUnit 5 – Forensic Science (supplemental materials) – 20 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d 11.B.5a,5b,5c,5d, 5e, 4f 12.A.5a12.B.4a12.C.5b13.A.5a,5b,5c13.B.5a,5b,5e1.Introduction to Forensic Science2.Types of Evidence3.Crime Scene4.Fingerprints & Lip prints5.Hair6.Fibers7.Drugs & Toxicology8.Document & Handwriting AnalysisLabs/Activities: Evidence Skits, Individual vs. Class Evidence Activity, Evaluating a Crime Scene Activity, Fingerprint Matching, Fingerprint Caper, Making & Lifting Fingerprints, Lip print Activities, Hair Analysis Lab, Fiber Lab, Spot Test Lab, Blood Typing Lab, Urinalysis Lab, Typewriting Lab, Handwriting Lab, Forgery Reports, Renter Beware Court TV Lab, Counterfeit Coin CaperUnit 6 – Nuclear Chemistry (chapter 18) – 15 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d 12.C.5a,5b12.D.4b13.A.5a,5b,5c,5d13.B.5b,4c,5d,5e1.Radioactivity2.Nuclear Reactions3.Half-Life4.Rates of Radioactive Decay5.Radioactive Dating6.Nuclear Fission & Nuclear Fusion7.Applications & Effects of RadioactivityLabs/Activities: Radioisotope Dating, Modeling IsotopesUnit 7 – Qualitative Analysis – Part 1 (supplemental materials) – 15 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d11.B.4f12.C.5b13.A.5a,5c1.Overview of Qualitative Analysis2.Group I Ions3.Group II IonsLabs/Activities: Separation and Identification of Group I Ions, Separation and Identification of Group II IonsUnit 8 – Thermochemistry (chapter 6 & chapter 16) – 15 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d11.B.4f12.C.5b13.A.5a,5c13.B.5b1.Energy (6.1, pp. 229-235)2.Specific Heat & Calorimetry (6.2, pp. 237-242)3.Energy and State Changes (supplemental materials)4.Enthalpy (6.2, pp. 235-236)5.Hess’s Law (6.3, pp. 242-246)6.Standard Enthalpies of Formation (6.4, pp. 246-252)7.Present Sources of Energy & Energy Alternatives (6.5-6.6, pp. 252-263)8.Entropy (16.1-16.3, pp. 749-75909.Gibb’s Free Energy (16.4-16.5, pp. 759-770)Labs/Activities: Potato Chip Calorimetry LabUnit 9 – Acid-Base Chemistry (chapter 14) – 15 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d12.C.5b13.A.5a,5c1.Acid & Base Definitions (14.1, pp. 623-626 & 14.11, pp. 663-665)2.Acid & Base Strength (14.2, pp. 626-630)3.pH & Acid-Base Equilibrium(14.3-14.7, pp. 631-655)Labs/Activities: Acid-Base Titration, Common Household Acids and Bases Lab, Qualitative Analysis of Antacid TabletsUnit 10 – Qualitative Analysis – Part 2 (supplemental materials) – 15 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d11.B.4f12.C.5b13.A.5a,5c1.Group III & IV IonsLabs/Activities: Separation and Identification of Group III-IV Ions, Separation and Identification of Group I-IV IonsUnit 11 – Chemical Equilibrium (chapter 13) – time remainingILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d11.B.4f12.C.5b13.A.5a,5c1.Equilibrium (13.1, pp. 579-582)2.Calculating Equilibrium Constants (13.2-13.6, pp. 582-604)3.Le Chatelier’s Principle (13.7, pp. 604-610)Course: Honors Chemistry 2Course Description: Honors Chemistry 2 is designed to challenge students with exceptional abilities in science and math. New areas covered in lecture will include chemical equilibrium, application of chemical equilibrium, coordination chemistry, chemical kinetics, and electrochemistry. Also many first year topics will be reviewed and expanded. Nearly one third of the course time will be allotted to laboratory work. The first semester lab assignments will emphasize quantitative analytical methods while the second semester will deal with qualitative analysis. For students desiring college credit, students may elect to enroll for up to eight semester hours of credit at Saint Louis University through the 1818 Dual Credit Program. The course will also provide the necessary background for success on the Advanced Placement Chemistry Examination.Prerequisites: Honors Chemistry 1 with a B or better OR Chemistry 1 with an A and Chemistry 1 teacher consent.Textbook: Silberberg, M., Chemistry, 2nd ed; McGraw Hill: Boston, MA, 2000.ISBN 0-07-116832-XGrading Scale: 97 & above A+, 96-93 A, 92-90 A-, 89-87 B+, 86-83 B, 82-80 B-, 79-77 C+, 76-73 C, 72-70 C-, 69-67 D+, 66-63 D, 62-60 D-, 59-0 FCourse Outline:Fall Labs:Labs/Activities: White Powders Lab, Quantitative Analysis of Antacid Tablets LabDistillation and Fractional Distillation Techniques LabDetermination of Percent Iron in Ore Lab, Percent Chlorine in Unknown Lab, Acid-Base Titrations Using the pH Meter Lab, Determination of Copper in an Ore by Spectrophotometry Lab, Determination of the Molarity of a Nickel Sample by SpectrophotometryUnit 1 Review of Honors Chemistry 1 Topics (Chapters 1, 2, 3, &13) 12 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c, 11.B.5a,5b,5c,5d, 12.C.5b 13.A.5a,5c1.Dimensional Analysis (1.4, pp. 14-16)2.SI Units (1.5, pp. 17-26)3.Significant Figures, Rounding, Uncertainty in Measurement (1.6, pp. 26-31)4.Concentrations of Solutions—Percent, Molarity, & Molality (13.4, pp. 497-502)5.Mole Calculations (3.1, pp. 89-97)6.Nomenclature, Balancing Formulas and Equations (Supplemental Worksheets)6.Mass-Volume Stoichiometry (3.4, pp. 107-115)7.Percent Composition (2.2, pp. 43-47) 8.Empirical and Molecular Formula Calculation (3.2, pp. 97-103)Unit 2 Thermochemistry (chapters 6, & 20)─ 11 daysILS: 11. A.5a, 12.C.4a,5a, 13.A.5b1.Definition, Forms and Units of Energy (6.1, pp. 224-230)2.Enthalpy Calculations (6.2, pp. 230-233)3.Calorimeter Calculations (6.3, pp. 236-239)4.Hess’s Law (6.5, pp. 241-243)5.Heats of Formation-Calculating Enthalpy Changes in Reactions (6.6, pp. 243-246)6.Entropy & Predicting Spontaneous Change 20.1, pp. 857-867)7.Calculating Entropy Change 20.2, pp. 867-8738.Calculations Involving Gibbs Free Energy Equation (20.3, pp. 873-880)9.Equilibrium and Reaction Direction (20.4, pp. 882-885)Unit 3 ─The Major Classes of Chemical Reactions (chapter 4) ─5 daysILS: 11.A.5a 12.C.5a 13.B.5b1.Water as a Solvent: Polar & Nonpolar Solutes (4.1, pp. 134-139)2.Precipitation Reactions and Acid-Base Reactions & Ionic Equations(4.2, pp. 139-148)3.Oxidation-Reduction Reactions (4.3, pp. 148-156)Unit 4 ─ Gases and the Kinetic-Molecular Theory (chapter 5) ─ 9 daysILS: 11.A.5a 12.C.5b 12.D.5a 1.Gas Behavior (5.1, pp. 177-178)2.Pressure Definition, Measurement and Units (5.1-5.2, pp. 179-182)bined Gas Laws of Boyle, Charles, and Guy-Lussac (5.3, pp. 182-190)4.Ideal Gas Law Equations (5.4-5.5, pp. 191-199)5.Kinetic Molecular Theory & Graham’s Law (5.6, 199-206)6.Real Gas Deviations from Ideal Behavior & the van der Waals Equation(5.7, pp. 206-212)Unit 5 – Equilibrium – The Extent of Chemical Reactions (chapter 17) – 10 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b 12.C.5a, 5b 13.A.5b1.Definition of Equilibrium as it Applies to Chemical Reactions (17.1, pp. 715-717)2.Reaction Quotient and Equilibrium Constant Calculations (17.2, pp. 717-724)3.Reaction Equilibrium with Pressure (17.3, pp. 724-727)4.Equilibrium Problems Determination of Reaction Direction (17.4, pp. 727-736)5.Reaction Conditions and Le Chatelier’s Principle (17.5, pp. 736-742)Unit 6 – Acid-Base Chemistry (chapter 18) – Remainder of Semester DaysILS: 11.A.5a,5b 12.C.5a,5b 13.A.5b1.Arrhenius Definition of Acids and Ka Constant (18.1, pp. 758-763)2.pH (18.2, pp. 764-768)3.Bronsted-Lowry Acid-Base Definition (18.3, pp. 768-772)4.Calculation of Ka for Weak Acids (18.4, pp. 772-779)5.Weak Bases and Kb Calculations (18.5, pp. 779-784)6.Lewis Acid-Base Definition (18.9, pp. 791-794)Labs/Activities: Qualitative Analysis of Group I IonsUnit 7 ─ Ionic Solution Equilibria (Buffers and Titrations) (chapter 19) ─ 12 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5c 12.C.5a,5b 13.A.5a,5b1.How Buffers Work and Essential Features of Buffers (19.1, pp. 806-814)2.Acid-Base Titration Curves and Indicators (19.2, pp. 814-822)3.Equilibria of Slightly Soluble Ionic Compounds (19.3, pp. 823-825)4.Ksp Calculations and Predicting the Formation of Precipitates (19.3, pp. 326-832)5.Applying Equilibria to Qualitative Analysis (19.5, pp. 840-845)Labs/Activities: Qualitative Analysis of Group II IonsUnit 8 ─ Kinetics (chapter 16) ─ 20 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5c 12.C.5a,5b 13.A.5a,5b1.Factors Influencing Reaction Rates (16.1, pp. 666-668)2.Reaction Rate Expressions (16.2, pp. 668-672)3.Rate Law (16.3, pp. 673-679)4.Integrated Rate Laws (16.4, pp. 679-684)5.Effect of Temperature on Reaction Rate (16.5, pp. 684-686)6.Effect of Concentration and Temperature on Reaction Rates (16.6, pp. 686-692)7.Reaction Mechanisms (16.7, pp. 692-697)8.Effect of Catalysts on Reaction Rate (16.8, pp. 697-701)Labs/Activities: Qualitative Analysis of Groups III & IVUnit 9 ─ Electrochemistry and Complex Ions (chapter 21 & 23) ─ 21 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5c 12.C.5a,5b 13.A.5a,5b1.Electrochemical Cells and Half-Reactions (21.1, pp. 895-900)2.Voltaic Cells and Electrical Energy (21.2, pp. 901-906)3.Cell Potential in a Voltaic Cell (21.3, pp. 906-915)4.Free Energy and Electrical Work (21.4, pp. 915-923)Labs/Activities: Qualitative Analysis of Groups I-IVUnit 10 ─ Organic Chemistry (Supplemental) ─ as time allows SEQ CHAPTER \h \r 1Course: Physics 1tc \l 1 ""Course Description: Physics is a two semester course exploring the workings of the physical universe. Physics 1 is a highly beneficial college preparatory course. This course is designed to prepare students who will be taking physics in college. However, due to the incorporation of high level thinking skill, physics will be a benefit to any student planning to attend college. Topics covered include: vectors, motion, mechanics, thermodynamics, electrostatics, electric circuits, magnetism, and optics. Labs and projects constitute a significant portion of the class. Students will be introduced to a variety of scientific equipment and tools. Successful completion of the first semester is required to continue on to the second semester.Prerequisites: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Advanced Algebra 2 AND successful completion of a first-year life science course.Textbook: Physics, sixth edition by Wilson, Buffa & Lou, Prentice Hall, 2007Grading Scale: 97 & above A+, 96-93 A, 92-90 A-, 89-87 B+, 86-83 B, 82-80 B-, 79-77 C+, 76-73 C, 72-70 C-, 69-67 D+, 66-63 D, 62-60 D-, 59-0 FCourse Outline:Unit 1 – Units and Vectors (chapters 1,3) – 15 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d 11.B.5a,5b,5ctc \l 1 ""1.Unit conversions (1.1-1.5)2. Vector representation (3.1)3. Addition of vectors (3.2)Labs/Activities: Unit conversion and vector addition labUnit 2 – Motion (chapters 2,3) – 13 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d1.Graphical interpretation of velocity (2.1-2.2)2.Acceleration (2.3)3.Kinematic equations (2.4)4.Free fall (2.5)5.Two dimensional motion (3.3)Labs/Activities: Motion lab practical, Projectile lab, Problem solving labUnit 3 – Force and Motiontc \l 1 "" (chapter 4) – 12 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d 12.D.4aNewton’s laws of motion (4.1-4.4)Applications of Newton’s second law (4.5)Friction (4.6)Tension (4.5)Accelerated reference frames (4.6)Labs/Activities: Friction lab practical, Equilibrium LabUnit 4 – Uniform Circular Motion and Gravitation (chapter 7) – 14 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d 12.D.3aUniform circular motion (7.3)Sources of centripetal force (7.3)Motion in a vertical circle (7.3)Newton’s law of gravity (7.5)Satellite Motion (7.6)Labs/Activities: Centripetal force labUnit 5 – Work and Energy (chapter 5) – 12 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5dWork (5.1)Energy (5.3)Kinetic energy (5.4)Potential energy (5.5)Conservation of energy (5.5)Power and Efficiency (5.6)Labs/Activities: Power and efficiency practicalUnit 6 – Momentum and Impulse (chapter 6) – 12 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d 11.B.5a,5b,5c,5dLinear momentum (6.1)Impulse (6.2)Conservation of Momentum (6.3)Inelastic collisions (6.4)Elastic collisions (6.4)Labs/Activities: Egg drop lab, Momentum conservation lab, Ballistic pendulum lab, Elastic collision predictionsUnit 7 – Angular Motion (chapter 7,8) – 11 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5dAngular velocity and angular acceleration (7.1-7.2)Rotational kinematics (8.3)Torque (8.2)Rotational kinetic energy (8.4)Rotational momentum (8.5)Labs/Activities: Angular motion practicalUnit 8 – Temperature and Heat (chapters 10,11) – 16 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d 11.B.5a,5b,5c,5d,5e 12.C.5btc \l 1 ""Temperature (10.1-10.2)Thermal expansion (10.4)Calorimetry (11.1-11.2)Latent heat (11.3)Heat transfer (11.4)Labs/Activities: Calorimetry LabUnit 9 – Electrostatics (chapters 15,16) – 12 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d 12.C.4bElectric charge (15.1-15.2)Coulomb’s law (15.3)Electric field (15.4)Electric potential (16.1-16.2)Labs/Activities: Problem solving labUnit 10 – Capacitance (chapter 16) – 10 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d 11.B.5a,5b,5c,5dtc \l 1 ""Capacitance (16.3)Capacitors in groups (16.5)Energy stored in capacitors (16.5)Labs/Activities: Capacitor construction lab, Capacitor grouping labUnit 11 – Current and Resistance (chapters17, 18) – 15 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5dCurrent (17.1-17.2)Resistance (17.3)Resistors in groups (18.1)Electrical power (17.4)Kirchhoff’s rules (18.2)Labs/Activities: Circuit lab, Wheatstone bridge labUnit 12 – Magnetism (chapter 19) – 14 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5dMagnets (19.1)Magnetic fields (19.2)Sources of magnetic fields (19.6)Force in a moving charge in a magnetic field (19.3)Force on a current carrying wire in a magnetic field (19.4)Labs/Activities: Magnetic field mapping, Electromagnet construction, Ammeter labUnit 13 – Electromagnetic Introduction (chapters 20,21) – 15 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d 11.B.5a,5b,5c,5d,5etc \l 1 ""Faraday’s law (20.1)Motional EMF (20.2)Inductance (21.3)Inductors (21.3)Labs/Activities: Inductor lab, Motor labCourse: Physics 2__________________________________________________________Course Description: Physics 2 is a two-semester course that continues the course of study began in Physics 1. It is a highly beneficial college preparatory course and is designed for the student with an interest in math, engineering and the physical sciences. Topics include: statics, fluids, harmonic motion, waves, gravitation and astronomy, optics, mechanics, thermodynamics, electrostatics, nuclear physics, and solid-state electronics. Labs and projects constitute a significant portion of the class. Students will be introduced to a variety of scientific equipment and tools. Prerequisite: Honors Physics 1 or Physics 1 with a minimum grade of B.Textbook: Physics, sixth edition by Wilson, Buffa & Lou, Prentice Hall, 2007Grading Scale: 100-93 A, 92-90 A-, 89-88 B+, 87-83 B, 82-80 B-, 79-78 C+, 77-73 C, 72-70 C-, 69-68 D+, 67-63 D, 62-60 D-, 59-0 FCourse Outline:Unit 1 – Static Equilibrium and ElasticityConditions of equilibriumExamples of rigid objects in static equilibriumCenter of Mass/Center of gravityLabs/Activities: Balance Lab, Mobile LabUnit 2- Solids and FluidsPressureArchimedes principle and buoyant forceFluid dynamicsEquation of continuityBernoulli’s PrincipleLabs/Activities: Aluminum boat lab, Barometer LabUnit 3-Nuclear PhysicsNuclear StructureBinding EnergyRadioactivityDecay processNuclear reactionsNuclear FissionNuclear FusionLabs/Activities: CERN StudyUnit 4-Simple Harmonic MotionMass/spring systemsEnergy of harmonic oscillatorsPendulumsLabs/Activities: Pendulum labUnit 6-WavesTypes of wavesOne dimensional traveling wavesSuperposition and interferenceStanding wavesLabs/Activities: Standing waves labUnit 7-OpticsNature of lightReflection and refractionTotal internal reflectionMirrorsThe human eyeSimple magnificationCompound lensesLabs/Activities: Light bench lab, Mirrors lab, Mirror image labUnit 8-Sound and MusicSound productionStanding waves in musical instrumentsOpen and closed pipesResonanceHarmonicsLabs/Activities: Resonance lab, Frequency and Pitch lab, Paper cup telephones, Design your musical instrument. SEQ CHAPTER \h \r 1Course: Honors Physics 1Course Description: Honors Physics 1 is a two semester course exploring the workings of the physical universe. It is a highly beneficial college preparatory course. This course is designed to for students with a strong math background and an interest in pursuing a career in science and engineering. Topics covered include: vectors, motion, mechanics, thermodynamics, electrostatics, electric circuits, and magnetism. Labs and projects constitute a significant portion of the class. Students will be introduced to a variety of scientific equipment and tools.Prerequisites: Trigonometry or concurrent enrollment in Trigonometry or concurrent enrollment in Honors Algebra 2 and physics instructor consent AND successful completion of a first-year life science course.Textbook: College Physics, seventh edition by Serway/Faughn, Thompson, 2006Grading Scale: 97 & above A+, 96-93 A, 92-90 A-, 89-87 B+, 86-83 B, 82-80 B-, 79-77 C+, 76-73 C, 72-70 C-, 69-67 D+, 66-63 D, 62-60 D-, 59-0 FCourse Outline:Unit 1 – Units and Vectors (chapters 1,3) – 10 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d 11.B.5a,5b,5ctc \l 1 ""1.Unit conversions (1.1-1.5)2.Vector representation (3.1)3.Addition of vectors (3.2)Labs/Activities: Unit conversion and vector addition labUnit 2 – Motion (chapter 2) – 9 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d1.Graphical interpretation of velocity (2.1-2.2)2.Acceleration (2.3-2.4)3.Kinematic equations (2.5)4.Free fall (2.6)Labs/Activities: Motion lab practical, Problem solving labUnit 3 – Two Dimensional Motion (chapters 3,7) – 9 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d1.Motion in two dimensions (3.3)2.Projectile Motion (3.4)3.Uniform circular motion (7.4)Labs/Activities: Projectile motion lab, Projectile target lab, Battleship labUnit 4 – Force and Motiontc \l 1 "" (chapter 4) – 14 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d 12.D.4a1.Newton’s laws of motion (4.1-4.4)2.Applications of Newton’s second law (4.5)3.Friction (4.6)4.Tension (4.5)5.Accelerated reference frames (4.5)Labs/Activities: Friction lab practical, Equilibrium LabUnit 5 – Circular Applications of Newton’s Laws (Chapter 7) – 13 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d 12.D.3a1.Sources of centripetal force (7.4)2.Motion in a vertical circle (7.4)3.Newton’s law of gravity (7.5)4.Satellite Motion (7.6)Labs/Activities: Centripetal force labUnit 6 – Work and Energy (chapter 5) – 11 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d1.Work (5.1, 5.7)2.Energy (5.2)3.Kinetic energy (5.2)4.Potential energy (5.3-5.4)5.Conservation of energy (5.5)6.Power and Efficiency (5.6)Labs/Activities: Power and efficiency practicalUnit 7 – Momentum and Impulse (chapter 6) – 11 daysILS:11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d 11.B.5a,5b,5c,5d1.Linear momentum (6.1)2.Impulse (6.1)3.Conservation of Momentum (6.2)4.Inelastic collisions (6.3)5.Elastic collisions (6.3)Labs/Activities: Egg drop lab, Momentum conservation lab, Ballistic pendulum lab, Elastic collision predictionsUnit 8 – Angular Motion (chapter 7,8) – 10 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d1.Angular velocity and angular acceleration (7.1)2.Rotational kinematics (7.2)3.Relations between linear and angular quantities (7.3)4.Torque (8.1, 8.5)5.Rotational kinetic energy (8.6)Rotational momentum (8.7)Labs/Activities: Angular motion practicalUnit 9 – Temperature and Heat (chapters 10,11) – 15 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d 11.B.5a,5b,5c,5d,5e 12.C.5btc \l 1 ""1.Temperature (10.1-10.2)2.Thermal expansion (10.3)3.Calorimetry (11.1-11.3)4.Latent heat (11.4)5.Heat transfer (11.5)Labs/Activities: Calorimetry LabUnit 10 – Thermodynamics (chapter 12) – 10 daysILS:11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d 11.B.5a,5b,5c,5d,5e 12.C.4a, 5a1.Work in thermodynamic processes (12.1)2.First law of Thermodynamics (12.2)3.Heat engines and the second law of thermodynamics(12.3)4.Entropy (12.4)Labs/Activities: Heat engine cycle designUnit 11 – Electrostatics (chapters 15,16) – 10 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d 12.C.4b1.Electric charge (15.1)2.Coulomb’s law (15.3)3.Electric field (15.4-15.5)4.Electric potential (16.1-16.3)Labs/Activities: Problem solving labUnit 12 – Capacitance (chapter 16) – 8 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d 11.B.5a,5b,5c,5dtc \l 1 ""1.Capacitance (16.6-16.7)2.Capacitors in groups (16.8)3.Energy stored in capacitors (16.9)Labs/Activities: Capacitor construction lab, Capacitor grouping labUnit 13 – Current and Resistance (chapters17, 18) – 13 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d1.Current (17.1-17.3)2.Resistance (17.4-17.7)3.Resistors in groups (18.2-18.3)4.Electrical power (17.8)5.Kirchhoff’s rules (18.4)Labs/Activities: Circuit lab, Wheatstone bridge labUnit 14 – Magnetism (chapter 19) – 12 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d1.Magnets (19.1-19.2)2.Magnetic fields (19.3)3.Sources of magnetic fields (19.9)4.Force in a moving charge in a magnetic field (19.6)5.Force on a current carrying wire in a magnetic field (19.7-19.8)Labs/Activities: Magnetic field mapping, Electromagnet construction, Ammeter labUnit 15 – Electromagnetic Introduction (chapters 20, 21) – 14 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d 11.B.5a,5b,5c,5d,5etc \l 1 ""1.Faraday’s law (20.1-20.2)2.Motional EMF (20.3)3.Inductance (21.6)4.Inductors (21.8)Labs/Activities: Inductor lab, Motor lab SEQ CHAPTER \h \r 1Course: Honors Physicstc \l 1 "" 2Course Description: Honors Physics 2 is a two semester course that continues the course of study began in Honors Physics 1. It is a highly beneficial college preparatory course. This course is designed to for students with a strong math background and an interest in pursuing a career in science and engineering. Topics covered include: Statics, Fluids, Gravitation, Nuclear Physics, Simple Harmonic Motion, Waves, Geometric Optics, Wave Optics and Ac Circuits. Labs and projects constitute a significant portion of the class. The entire third quarter of the class is spent in the design, construction and operation of a robot for the U.S. F.I.R.S.T. Robotics Competition. Students will be introduced to a variety of scientific equipment and tools.Prerequisites: Completion of Honors Physics 1 or Physics 1 with a grade of “B” or better Textbook: Physics for Scientists and Engineers, fourth edition by Serway, Harcourt Brace, 1996Grading Scale: 97 & above A+, 96-93 A, 92-90 A-, 89-87 B+, 86-83 B, 82-80 B-, 79-77 C+, 76-73 C, 72-70 C-, 69-67 D+, 66-63 D, 62-60 D-, 59-0 FCourse Outline:Unit 1 – Static Equilibrium and Elasticity (chapter 12) – 13 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d 11.B.5a,5b,5ctc \l 1 ""1. Conditions of equilibrium (12.1)2. Examples of rigid objects in static equilibrium (12.3)3. Elastic Properties of SolidsLabs/Activities: Static equilibrium practical, Balance lab, Scale lab, Elasticity labUnit 2 – Fluids (chapter 15) – 13 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d 11.B.5a,5b,5cPressure (15.1-15.3)2.Archimedes principle and buoyant force (15.4)3.Fluid dynamics (15.5)4.Equation of continuity (15.6)5.Bernoulli’s Principle (15.7)Labs/Activities: Hydrostatic paradox, Boat lab, Problem solving labUnit 3 – Gravitation (chapter 14) – 10 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d 11.B.5a,5b,5c 12.D.4a 12.D.5b1.Newton’s law of gravity (14.1)2.Gravitational field (14.6)3.Kepler’s laws (14.4)4.Gravitational potential energy5.Energy considerations in satellite motion (14.8)Labs/Activities: Gravity problem, Solar system labUnit 4 – Nuclear Physics (chapters 45, 46) – 16 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d 11.B.5a,5b,5c 12.D.5b1.Nuclear structure (45.1)2.Binding energy (45.3)3.Radioactivity (45.5)4.Decay processes (45.6-45.7)5.Nuclear reactions (45.8)6.Nuclear fission (46.1-46.3)7.Nuclear fusion (46.4)Labs/Activities: Atomic bomb labUnit 5 – Simple Harmonic Motion (chapter 13) – 12 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d1.Mass spring systems (13.1-13.2)2.Energy of a simple harmonic oscillator (13.3)3.Pendulums (13.4)Labs/Activities: Pendulum lab, Timer labUnit 6 – Waves (chapters 16,18) – 12 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d1.Types of waves (16.1-16.2)2.One dimensional traveling waves (16.3)3.Superposition and interference (16.4)4.Speed of waves on a string(16.5)5.Standing waves (18.2)Labs/Activities: Standing waves lab, Unit 7 – Robotics project – 45 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d 11.B.5a,5b,5c 13.A.5aLabs/Activities: Design, construct, troubleshoot, and operate a robot in the US F.I.R.S.T. Robotics Competition.Unit 9 – Geometric Optics (chapters 35,36) – 16 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d 11.B.5a,5b,5c,5d,5e 12.C.5btc \l 1 ""1.The nature of light (35.1)2.Reflection and refraction (35.4)3.Total internal reflection(35.7)4.Images formed by mirrors (36.1-36.2)5.Images formed by lenses (36.3-36.4)6.The eye (36.7)7.The simple magnifier ( 36.8)8.The compound microscope (36.9)9.The telescope (36.10)Labs/Activities: Reflection problem, Images with mirrors exercise, images with lenses exercise, telescope labUnit 9 – Wave optics (chapters 37,38) – 15 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d 12.C.4b1.Conditions for interference (37.1)2.Young’s double slit experiment (37.2)3.Phasor addition of waves (37.4)4.Interference in thin films (37.6)5.Diffraction (38.1)6.Single slit diffraction (38.2)7.The diffraction grating (38.4)8.Polarization (38.6)Labs/Activities: Double slit interference activity, Diffraction grating activity, spectrometer lab, Soap bubble activity, Thin film design labUnit 10 – Alternating Current Circuits (chapter 33) – 10 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d 11.B.5a,5b,5c,5dtc \l 1 ""1.AC sources and phasors (33.1)2.Resistors in an ac circuit (33.2)3.Inductors in an ac circuit (33.3)4.Capacitors in an ac circuit (33.4)5.The RLC series circuit (33.5)6.Power in an ac circuit (33.6)7.Resonance in an a series RLC Circuit (33.7)8.Filter circuits (33.8)9.Transformers and power transmission (33.9)Labs/Activities: Problem solving lab, Radio lab, Magnetic field mapping, Electromagnet construction, Ammeter labOTHS Life Science Courses – Curriculum GuidesBiology 159Honors Biology 165Honors Biology 271Integrated Life Science76Environmental Science81Human Anatomy & Physiology85Course: Biology 1Course description: Biology 1 is designed to provide students with introductory knowledge of fundamental biological principles and a general understanding of life. The natural progression from cells to simple organisms, to more complex organisms, and ultimately to man will be explored. Students will learn about interrelationships of living things and their environmental adaptations. Students will also gain understanding of the significance and importance of biological concepts to human welfare. Students will complete laboratory exercises that reinforce the lecture material and stimulate their interests in biology and other sciences.Prerequisites: NoneTextbook: Biology, by Miller and Levine, Prentice Hall Publishing, 2010Grading Scale: 97 & above A+, 96-93 A, 92-90 A-, 89-87 B+, 86-83 B, 82-80 B-, 79-77 C+, 76-73 C, 72-70 C-, 69-67 D+, 66-63 D, 62-60 D-, 59-0 FCourse Outline:Unit 1 – Introduction to Science as a way of Learning About the Natural World and Introductory Biochemistry (chapters 1 and 2) – 17 days ILS:11.A.4a-e11.B.4a-f12.A.4b 12.C.4b12.D.4b13.A.4a, 13.B.4a1.Laboratory Safety2.What is Science (1.1 pp. 2-5)3.Scientific Methodology (1.1 pp. 6-9)4.Scientific Theories (1.2 p. 13)5.The Nature of Matter (2.1 pp. 34-39)6.Properties of Water (2.2 pp. 40-44)7.Carbon Compounds (2.3 pp. 45-49)Labs/Activities: Airplane Scientific Method Lab, Metric Measurements Lab, Water Purification Lab, Physical/Chemical Changes DemosUnit 2 – Evolution and Classification (chapters 1, 16, 18 and 19) – 12 daysILS:11.A.4a, 4e12.A.5a, 3c, 4c12.B.4a, 4b, 5b12.E.4b12.F.4.a13.A.3a ,4a, 3b, 4b, 5b, 4d, 5d1.Studying Life (1.3, pp. 17-21)2.Scientific Methodology (1.1, pp. 6-9)3.Finding Order in Diversity (18.1, pp. 510-515)4.Modern Evolutionary Classification (18.2, pp. 516-522)5.Kingdoms and Domains (18.3, pp.523-528)6.Darwin’s Voyage of Discovery (16.1, pp. 450-453)7.The Ideas That Shaped Darwin’s Thinking (16.2, pp. 454-458)8.Darwin Presents His Case (16.3, pp. 460-464)9.Evidence of Evolution (16.4, pp. 465-473)10.Earth’s Early History (19.3, pp. 553-558)Labs/Activities: Characteristics of life drawing, Insect and leaf collection at Rock Springs Park, Natural Selection Game, Create a dichotomous keyUnit 3 – Cell Structure, Transport and Protists (chapters 7 and 21) – 22 daysILS: 11.A.4a, 5a, 4b, 4c, 4e12.A.4a, 4b, 4c12.B.4a13.A.4a, 4b1.Life is Cellular (7.1, pp. 190-195)2.Cell Structures (7.2, pp.196-207)3.Cell Transport (7.3. pp. 208-213)4. Protist Classification (21.1, pp. 602-605)5. Protist Structure and Function (21.2, pp. 606-609)6.The Ecology of Protists (21.3, pp. 610-616)Labs/Activities: Cell Structure poster, Egg Lab, Micro viewer Lab (cells and Protists), Microscope Labs I and II, Bubble Lab, Diffusion Lab, Protist disease research, CDC casesUnit 4 – Bacteria and Viruses (chapter 20) - 15 daysILS: 11.A.4a, 4b, 4c, 4e, 4f12.A.4a and 4c13.A.4a, 4b13.B.4e1.Prokaryotes (20.2, pp. 580-585)2.Diseases Caused by Bacteria and Viruses (20.3 pp. 586-592)3.Viruses (20.1, pp. 574-579)Labs/Activities: Cleaner Lab, Virus Replication Lab, AIDS and Its Effect on the Immune System, Yogurt Lab, Ebola and E.coli: Raw Terrors Videos, Bacteria and Virus Disease ResearchUnit 5 – Cellular Respiration (chapter 9) – 6 daysILS:11.A.4a, 5a, 4b, 4c, 4e12A.4a, 4b1.Cellular Respiration: An Overview (9.1, pp. 250-253)2.The Process of Cellular Respiration (9.2, pp. 254-261)3.Fermentation (9.3, pp. 262-265)4.Photosynthesis Overview (3.2, 8.1, 8.2; pp. 70, 226-234)5.The Process of Photosynthesis (8.3; pp. 235-241)Labs/Activities: Fermentation Bottle, Anaerobic/Aerobic Respiration Lab Unit 6 – Cell Growth and Division (chapter 10) – 6 daysILS:11.A.4a, 5a, 4b, 4c, 4d12.A.4a, 5a, 4b, 5b13.A.4b, 4c13.B.5e1.Cell Growth, Division and Reproduction (10.1, pp. 274-278)2.Cell Division (10.2, pp. 279-285)3.Regulating the Cell Cycle (10.3, pp. 286-291) Labs/Activities: Surface area to Volume/Mass Ratio Lab, Plant Mitosis Cut and Paste Lab, Microscope/Microviewer LabUnit 7 – Introductory Genetics (chapters 11 and 12) – 21 daysILS:11.A.4a, 5a, 4b, 4c, 4f12.A.4a, 5a, 4b, 5b, 4c13.A.4a, 4b, 4c, 5c, 4d, 5d13.B.4a, 5e 1.The Work of Gregor Mendel (11.1, pp. 308-312)2.Probability and Punnett Squares (11.2, pp. 313-318)3.Other Patterns of Inheritance (11.3, pp. 319-322)4.Meiosis (11.4, pp. 323-329)5.Identifying the Substance of Genes (12.1, pp.338-343)6.The Structure of DNA (12.2, pp. 344-349)7.DNA Replication (12.3, pp. 350-353)Labs/Activities: Beebop Lab, DNA Extraction Lab, Meiosis Flip BookUnit 8 – Modern Genetics (chapters 14 and 15) – 20 daysILS:11.A.4c, 4e12.A.4a, 4b, 5b, 4c13.A.4a. 4b, 4c13.B.4a, 4b, 5b, 5e1.Human Chromosomes (14.1, pp. 392-397)2.Human Genetic Disorders (14.2, pp. 398-402)3.Studying the Human Genome (14.3, pp. 403-409)4.Selective Breeding (15.1, pp. 418-420)5.Applications of Genetic Engineering (15.3, pp. 428-436)Labs/Activities: Gene Splicing Lab, Bell Curve/Class Picture, Genetic Disorder Problems, Karyotype Lab, Pedigrees, Genetic Inheritance, Inheritance of Sex Linked Traits LabUnit 9 – Invertebrates (chapters 25, 27 and 28) – 22 daysILS:12.A.4a, 5a, 4b, 4c12.B. 4a, 5a, 5b13.A.4a, 5a, 13. B.4b, 5e1.Introduction to the Animal Kingdom (25.1, pp. 730-736)2.Sponges (26.1, 27.1, 28.3; pp. 752, 754, 784, 821)idarians (26.1, 27.1, 28.1, 28.2, 28.3; pp. 754, 784, 810, 814, 820)4.Flatworms (26.1, 27.1, 27.4, 28.1; pp. 755, 783, 794, 796, 810, 812)5.Roundworms (26.1, 27.1, 28.1; pp. 755, 783, 810)6.Annelids (26.1 and 27.3; pp. 755-756, 792)7.Mollusks (26.1, 28.1, 28.2; pp. 756, 810, 815)8.Arthropods (26.1, 28.2, 28.3; pp. 755, 815, 817, 821)9.Insects (26.1 and 27.2; pp. 755 and 789)10.Echinoderms (25.2, 26.1, 28.1, 28.2; pp.739, 756-757, 810, 815)Labs/Activities: Invertebrate Zoo Project, Earthworm dissection, Squid dissection, Arthropod comparison lab, Parasitic Worm PresentationUnit 10 – Vertebrates (chapters 26, 27 and 28) – 16 days ILS:11.A.4c12.A.4a, 5a, 4b, 4c12.B.4a, 5a, 4b, 5b13.A.4a13.B.4b, 4c, 3d, 5e1.Fishes (26.2, 27.2, 27.3, 27.4, 28.1, 28.3; pp. 758-760, 788, 792, 795-796, 811, 821-822)2.Amphibians (26.2, 27.3, 28.1, 28.3; pp. 761, 790, 793, 811, 821-822)3.Reptiles (26.2, 27.2, 27.3, 28.1; pp. 762, 790, 793, 811)4.Birds (26.2, 27.1, 27.2, 27.4, 28.4; pp. 762-763, 785, 790, 797, 811, 829-830)5.Introduction to Mammals (26.2, pp. 764)6.Diversity of Mammals (27.2, 28.1, 28.3; pp. 790, 811, 825-826)Labs/Activities: Sex and the Single Guppy, Frog Deformities, Shark Dissection, Snakes of Illinois Presentation, Birds of Illinois PresentationUnit 11 – The Human Body (chapters 30, 31, 32, and 33) 15 daysILS: 11.A.4a, 4b, 4c, 4e 12.A.4b, 5aOrganization of the Human Body (30.1, pp. 862-864)Functions of the Nervous System (31.1, p. 896)Neurons and Synapses (31.1, pp. 897-900)The Skeleton and Bones (32.1, pp. 922-925)Joints (32.1, pp. 926-927)Muscular System and Types of Muscle (32.2, pp. 928-929)Muscles and Movement (32.2, pp. 932-933)Functions of the Circulatory System (33.1, p. 948)The Heart and Circulation (33.1, pp. 949-952)Circulatory System Diseases (33.2, pp. 957-961)Structures of the Respiratory System (33.3, pp. 963-965)Gas Exchange and Transport (33.3, pp. 966-968)Smoking and the Respiratory System (33.3, pp. 968-969)Labs/Activities: Neurons Flow Chart, Conduction Speed and Neuron Diameter Graph, Chicken Wing Tendon Demo, What’s in the Air? Lab, Lung Capacity LabUnit 12 – Plants and Photosynthesis (chapters 3, 22, 23 and 24) – 8 days ILS:11.A.4a, 5a, 4b, 4c, 4e12.A.5a, 4b1.Introduction to Plants (22.1, pp. 634-638)2.Seed Plants (22.3, pp. 646-649)3.Angiosperms (22.4, pp. 650-654)4.Specialized Tissues in Plants (23.1, pp. 664-668)5.Roots (23.2, pp. 669-673)6.Stems (23.3, pp. 674-679)7.Leaves (23.4, pp. 680-684)8.Transport in plants (23.5, pp. 685-688)9.Reproduction With Cones and Flowers (24.1, pp. 696-703)Labs/Activities: Seed Germination Lab, Flower Dissection, Root, Stem and Leaf LabCourse: Honors Biology 1Course Description: Honors Biology I is designed to provide advanced students with a thorough understanding of biological principles and a comprehensive understanding of life. The course will cover a range of topics, including cellular structure and genetics, plant and animal classifications, microbiology, ecology, biochemistry, vertebrate and invertebrate anatomy, and plant structure and function. This course utilizes discussion, laboratory exercises, and hands-on activities all designed to stimulate interest and appreciation for biology and its importance to man.Prerequisites: Invitation only, based on EXPLORE science test and teacher recommendation.Textbook: Biology by Miller and Levine, Prentice Hall Publishing, 2010Grading Scale: 97 & above A+, 96-93 A, 92-90 A-, 89-87 B+, 86-83 B, 82-80 B-, 79-77 C+, 76-73 C, 72-70 C-, 69-67 D+, 66-63 D, 62-60 D-, 59-0 FCourse Outline:Unit 1 – Introduction to science and a way of learning about the natural world. Introduction to Biochemistry; Inorganic and Organic Compounds; Physical and Chemical changes; and properties of water. Introduction to Classification and Evolution (chapter 1, 2, and 18) – 38 daysILS:11.A.4a-e11.B.4a-f12.A.4b, 5a, 3c. 4c12.B.4a,4b, 5b12.C.4b12.D.4b12.E.4b12.F.4a13.A.2a-5a, 3b-5b, 13.A.4d, 5d13.B.4aLab Safety, graphing techniques, data presentationWhat is Science (Sec.1-1, ppp.2-7How Scientists Work(Sec.1-2, ppp.8-15)Tools and Procedures (Sec.1-4, ppp.24-28)Studying Life (Sec. 1-3, ppp.16-22)The Nature of Matter(Sec.2-1, ppp.34-39)Properties of Water (Sec.2-2, ppp.40-43)Carbon Compounds (Sec.2-3, ppp.44-48)Chemical Reactions and Enzymes (Sec.2-4, ppp.49-53)Puzzle of Life’s Diversity (Sec.15-1, ppp.368-372)The Ideas that Shaped Darwin’s Thinking (Sec.15-2, ppp.373-377)Darwin Presents His Case (Sec.15-3, ppp.378-386)Earth’s Early History (Sec.17-2, pp.428-433)Finding Order in Diversity (Sec.18-1, p,446-450)Modern Evolutionary Classification (Sec.18-2, pp.451-456)Kingdoms and Domains (Sec.18-3, pp.457-461)Labs/Activities: Cabbage Juice Lab (S.M), Metric Measurements Lab, Microscope Usage Lab, Skills Activities; Graphing, Presenting Data, Org Classification, Leaf Collection Project, Create a Dichotomous Key, Physical and Chemical Changes Lab, pH lab, Organic Compounds test lab, Mixtures Demonstration Unit 2 – Cells (chapter 7 and 20) – 18 daysILS:11.A.4a, 5a, 4b, 4c, 4e12.A.4a, 4b, 4c12.B.4a, 3b13.A.4a, 4b1.Life is Cellular (Sec.7-1, pp.168-172)2.Cell Structure (Sec.7-2, pp.173-181)3.Cell Boundaries (Sec.7-3, pp.182-189)4.Diversity of Cellular Life (Sec.7-4, pp.190-193)5.Kingdom Protista (Sec.20-1, pp.497-498)6.Animal-like Protists (Sec.20-2, pp.499-505)7.Plant-like Protists Unicellular (Sec.20-3, pp.506-509)8.Plant-like Protists Multicellular (Sec.20-4, pp.510-515)9.Fungi-like Protists (Sec.20-5, pp.516-520)Labs/Activities: Cell Models (3-d), Diffusion Lab/ Osmosis Demo, Bubble Lab, Plasmolysis, Microviewer Lab (Cells and Protists), Protist Dry Labs -Non-Photosynthetic & Photosynthetic, Egg Demo LabUnit 3 – Photosynthesis and Respiration (chapter 8 and 9) – 13-14 daysILS:11.A.4a, 5a, 4b, 4c, 4e12.A.4a, 4bEnergy and Life (Sec.8-1, pp.201-203)Photosynthesis: Overview (Sec.8-2, pp.204-207)Reactions of Photosynthesis (Sec.8-3, pp.208-215)Chemical Pathways (Sec.9-1, pp.221-225)Krebs Cycle and Electron Transport Chain (Sec.9-2, pp.226-233)Labs/Activities: Modeling PP.S. and respiration Using Diagrams, Chromatography Lab, Ins and outs of Photosynthesis Lab, Affects of Exercise on Cellular Respiration LabUnit 4 – Cell Growth and Division (chapter 10) – 7-8 daysILS:11.A.4a, 5a, 4b, 4c, 4e12.A.4a, 5a, 4b, 5b13.A.4b, 4c13.B.5eCell Growth (Sec.10-1, pp.241-243)Cell Division (Sec.10-2, pp.244-249)Regulating the Cell Cycle (Sec.10-3, pp.250-253)Labs/Activities: Modeling Cell Cycle with pipe cleaners, Cell Cycle Lab (Cut and Paste), Micro Viewer Slides A) Plant B) Animal, Microscope Labs identifying stages of cell cycles, Related Video, Surface Area/Volume Ratio LabUnit 5 – Intro to Genetics and DNA and RNA (Chapter 11 & 12) – 22 daysILS:11.A.4a, 5a, 4b, 4c, 4f12.A.4a, 5a, 4b, 5b, 4c13.B.4a, 4b, 5e1.The work of Gregor Mendel (Sec.11-1, pp.263-266)2.Probability and Punnett Squares (Sec.11-2, pp.267-269)3.Exploring Mendelian Genetics (Sec.11-3, pp.270-274)4.Meiosis (Sec.11-4, pp.275-278)5.Linkage and Gene Maps (Sec. 11-5, pp.279-280)6.DNA (Sec.12-1, pp.287-294)7.Chromosomes and DNA Replication (Sec.12-2, pp.295-299)8.RNA and Protein Synthesis (Sec.12-3, pp.300-306)9.Mutations (Sec.12-4, pp.307-308)Labs/Activities: Probability Lab, Genetic Problems/Punnet Squares, Meiosis Modeling with Pipe Cleaners, Comparing Mitosis/Meiosis Lab, DNA Extraction Lab, Protein Synthesis (Wall Translation), Modeling-Replication and Protein SynthesisUnit 6 – Genetic Engineering & the Human Genome (chapter 13 & 14) – 16-17 daysILS:11.A.4c, 4e12.A.4a, 4b, 4c, 5b13.A.4a, 4b, 4c13.B.4a, 4b, 5b, 5e1.Changing the Living World (Sec.13-1, pp.319-321)2.Manipulating DNA (Sec.13-2, pp.322-325)3.Cell Transformation (Sec.13-3, pp.327-329)4.Applications of Genetic Engineering (Sec.13-4, pp.331-333)5.Human Heredity (Sec.41-1, pp.341-348)6.Human Chromosomes (Sec.14-2, pp.349-353)7.Human Molecular Genetics (Sec.14-3, pp.355-360)Labs/Activities: Gene Splicing/Transformation Activity, Genetic Disorder Problems (Human), Karyotype, Pedigrees, Sex Linked Trait Lab, Genetic Fingerprinting Activity, Genetic Human Disorder ResearchUnit 7 – Bacteria and Viruses, Fungi (chapter 19 & 21) – 15 daysILS:11.A.4a, 4b, 4c, 4e, 4f12.A.4a, 4c13.A.4a, 4b13.B.4e1.Bacteria (Sec.19-1, pp.471-477)2.Viruses (Sec.19-2, pp.478-484)3.Diseases Caused by Bacteria and Viruses (Sec.19-3, pp.485-490)4.Fungi Structure (Sec.21-1, pp.527-528)5.Fungi Classification (Sec.21-2, pp.530-536)Labs/Activities: Cleaner Lab (demo), Aids Simulation Lab, Virus Replication Lab, AIDS and its effect on the Immune System, Bacteria Video/Discovery, Ebola and E.coli: Raw Terrors Video, Bacteria and Virus Research, Rotten World Around Us (Video)Unit 8 – Invertebrates (chapters 26, 27, 28) – 23-24 daysILS:12.A.4a, 4b, 4c, 5a12.B.4a, 5a, 5b13.A.4a, 5a13.B.4b, 5e1.Intro to Animal Kingdom (Sec.26-1, pp.657-663)2.Sponges (Sec.26-2, pp.664-667)idarians (Sec.26-3, pp.669-675)4.Flatworms (Sec.27-1, pp.683-687)5.Roundworms (Sec.27-2, pp.689-693)6.Annelids (Sec.27-3, pp.694-699)7.Mollusks (Sec.27-4, pp.701-708)8.Arthropods (Sec.28-1, pp.715-719)9.Groups of Arthropods (Sec.28-2, pp.720-725)10.Insects (Sec.28-3, pp.726-733)11.Echinoderms (Sec.28-4, pp.734-738)Labs/Activities: Sponge Micro View Lab, Earthworm CD dissection, Cleavage/Tissue Development(Micro View), Hydra Micro View Lab, Arthropod Comparison Lab, Survey of Sponges, Coelenterates, Flatworms, and Roundworms Lab, Squid Dissection, Starfish Dissection, Related VideosUnit 9 – Vertebrates (chapter 30, 31, and 32) – 12 daysILS:11.A.4c12.A.4a, 4b, 4c, 5a12.B.4a, 4b, 5a, 5b13.A.4a13.B.3d, 4b, 4c, 5e1.The Chordates (Sec.30-1, pp.767-769)2.Fishes (Sec.30-2, pp.771-781)3.Amphibians (Sec.30-3, pp.782-789)4.Reptiles (Sec.31-2, pp.797-805)5.Birds (Sec.31-2, pp.806-814)6.Intro to Mammals (Sec.32-1, pp.821-827)7.Diversity of Mammals (Sec.32-2, pp.828-832)Labs/Activities: Shark Dissection, Chick Development Lab, Related VideosUnit 9 – Plant Diversity, Plant Structure, Plant Reproduction (chapter 22, 23, 24) – 7-8 daysILS:11.A.4a, 4b, 4c, 4e12.A.4b, 5a1.Intro to Plants (Sec.221, pp.550-555)2.Seed Plants (Sec.22.4, pp.564-568)3.Angiosperms (Sec.22-3, pp.569-572)4.Plant Tissues (Sec.23.1, pp.578-583)5.Roots (Sec.23.2, pp.584-588)6.Stems (Sec.23.3, pp.589-594)7.Leaves (Sec.23.4, pp.595-598)8.Transport in Plants (Sec.23.5, pp.599-602)9.Reproduction With Cones and Flowers (Sec.24.1, pp.608-617)Labs/Activities: Micro View Labs: Monocots & Dicots, Root of Flowering Plants. Stem of Flowering Plants, Leaf of Flowering Plants, Flower of Flowering Plants; Seed LabCourse: Honors Biology 2Course Description: Honors Biology 2 is a college-level course for the above average student. The aim of this course is to provide students with the vocabulary, concepts, facts, and analytical skills necessary to deal with the rapidly changing science of biology. The three general areas covered in the course are: molecules and cells (includes biological chemistry, cells, energy transformations), genetics and evolution (includes molecular genetics, heredity, evolution) and organisms and populations (includes detailed study of ecology and plants.) Laboratory exercises are college level. Laboratory work provided in this course is designed to reinforce facts, principles, and concepts covered in lectures, reading, and discussions. These exercises develop laboratory skills and encourage problem solving, research techniques, use of scientific literature, and higher-order thinking. For students desiring college credit, students may elect to enroll for four semester hours of credit at Saint Louis University through the 1818 Dual Credit Program. The course also provides the necessary background for success on the Advanced Placement Biology Examination.Prerequisites: Chemistry I with a “C” or better OR Honors Chemistry with a “C” or better AND Honors Biology I with a “B” or better or Biology I with an A.Textbook: Biology, 7th Edition by Campbell & Reece, 2005Grading Scale: 97 & above A+, 96-93 A, 92-90 A-, 89-87 B+, 86-83 B, 82-80 B-, 79-77 C+, 76-73 C, 72-70 C-, 69-67 D+, 66-63 D, 62-60 D-, 59-0 FCourse Outline:Unit 1 – Introduction and the Chemistry of Life (chapters 1, 3-4) – 18 daysILS: 11.A.5a,5b,5c,5d12.C.5b13.A.5a, 5b,5c1.Biological Themes (1.1-1.6, pp. 2-31) 2.Scientific Methods (1.5, pp. 19-25)3.Properties of Water (3.1-3.2, pp. 47-50)4.Solutions (3.2, pp. 51-52)5.pH (3.3, pp. 53-57)6.Acid Precipitation (3.3, pp. 55-56)7.Hydrocarbons (4.1-4.2, pp. 58-62)8.Functional Groups (4.3, pp. 63-67)9.Polymers (5.1, pp. 68-69)10.Carbohydrates, Lipids, Proteins, Nucleic Acids (5.2-5.5, pp. 69-91)Labs/Activities: Biological Themes Poster, Yeast Lab, pH Dry Lab, Modeling Protein StructureUnit 2 – Ecology (chapters 50, 52-55) – 24 daysILS:11.A.5c, 11.A.5d12.A.5a12.B.5a, 5b1.Ecology Introduction (50.1-50.2, pp. 1080-1091)2.Aquatic Biomes (50.3, pp. 1092-1097)3.Terrestrial Biomes (50.4, pp. 1098-1105)4.Population Density, Dispersion, and Demography (52.1, pp. 1136-1140)5.Life Histories (52.2, pp. 1141-1143)6.Population Growth Models (52.3-52.4, pp. 1143-1147)7.Population Dynamics (52.5, pp. 1148-1151)8.Human Population (52.6, pp. 1152-1158)9.Ecological Communities (53.1-53.3, pp. 1159-1174)10.Biogeography (53.4, pp. 1175-1177)11.Integrated and Individualistic Hypotheses (53.5, pp. 1178-1179)12.Trophic Relationships (54.1, pp. 1184-1185)13.Primary Production (54.2, pp. 1186-1190)14.Energy Flow (54.3, pp. 1191-1194)15.Biogeochemical Cycles (54.4, pp. 1195-1199)16.Human Disruptions of Cycles (54.5, pp. 1200-1208)17.Maintaining Biodiversity (55.1-55.2, 55.5, pp. 1209-1219, 128-1230)Labs/Activities: Lynx-Hare Simulation, A Sand County Almanac Excerpts: Reading and Comments, Food & Land Activity, Ecosystem Study at Shaw Nature Reserve, Advanced Placement (AP) Lab 12: Dissolved OxygenUnit 3 – Cellular Biology (chapters 6-10) – 39 daysILS:11.A.5c, 11.A.5d11.B.5a, 11.B.5c, 12.A.5a12C.5a1.Microscopes and Techniques (6.1, pp. 94-97)2.Prokaryotic Vs. Eukaryotic Cells (6.2, pp. 98-101)3.Intracellular Structures (6.3-6.6, pp. 102-117)4.Extracellular Components (6.7, pp. 118-123)5.The Fluid Mosaic Model (7.1, pp. 124-129)6.Membrane Transport (7.2-7.5, pp. 130-140)7.Metabolism and Thermodynamics (8.1-8.2, pp. 141-149)8.ATP Reactions (8.3, pp. 148-150)9.Enzymes (8.4-8.5, pp. 150-159)10.Oxidation of Glucose in Glycolysis (9.1-9.2, pp. 160-167)11.Citric Acid Cycle (9.3, pp. 168-169)12.Oxidative Phosphorylation (9.4, pp. 170-173)13.Fermentation (9.5, pp. 174-176)14.Other Metabolic Pathways (9.6, pp. 176-180)15.Photosynthesis (10.1-10.4, pp. 181-200)16.Cellular Communication (11.1-11.4, pp. 201-217)17.The Cell Cycle (12.1-12.3, pp. 218-235)Labs/Activities: AP Lab 1: Diffusion/Osmosis, AP Lab 2: Enzyme Catalysis, AP Lab 5: Cell Respiration, AP Lab 4: Plant Pigments and Photosynthesis, Caramel Popcorn Lab, AP Lab 3: Mitosis, Design and Construct a Biological ModelUnit 4 – Genetics (chapters 13-20) – 30 daysILS:11.A.5c, 11.A.5d12.A.5a, 5b13.B.5a, 13.B.5d, 13.B.5e1.Asexual Vs. Sexual Reproduction (13.1-13.2, pp. 238-242)2.Phases of Meiosis (13.3, pp. 243-247)3.Sources of Genetic Variation (13.4, pp. 247-250)4.Mendelian Genetics and Probability (14.1-14.2, pp. 251-259)5.Inheritance Patterns (14.3-14.4, pp. 260-273)6.Chromosomal Inheritance (15.1-15.3, pp. 274-284)7.Chromosomal Alterations (15.4-15.5, pp. 285-292)8.DNA Structure (16.1, pp. 293-298)9.DNA Replication (16.2, pp. 299-308)10.RNA Transcription (17.1-17.3, pp. 309-319)11.RNA Translation (17.4-17.5, pp. 320-327)12.Mutations (17.7, pp. 328-333)13.Bacterial Genetics (18.3-18.4, pp. 346-358)14.Eukaryotic Gene Regulation (19.1-19.4, pp. 359-377)15.DNA Technologies (20.1-20.5, pp. 384-410)Labs/Activities: AP Lab 3: Meiosis, Genetics Practice Problems, AP Lab 7: Genetics of Fruit Flies, View and Discuss, “Race for the Double Helix”, Protein Mapping, AP Lab 6: Molecular BiologyUnit 5 – Mechanisms of Evolution (chapters 22-26) – 16 daysILS:11.A.5c, 11.A.5d12.A.5a, 5b12.B.5a, 5b1.Darwin’s Theory of Evolution (22.1-22.3, pp. 438-453)2.Population Genetics (23.1, pp. 454-458)3.Evolution and Genetic Variation (23.2, pp. 459-460)4.Natural Selection (23.3-23.4, pp. 460-471)5.Other Sources of Evolution (23.3, pp. 460-461)6.Speciation (24.1-24.3, pp. 472-490)7.Phylogeny and Systematics (25.1-25.5, pp. 491-510)8.The Fossil Record (26.1-26.2, pp. 513-520)Labs/Activities: Teddy Graham Evolution, AP Lab 7: Population Genetics and Evolution Unit 6 – Plant Form and Function (chapters 35-36, 38, pp. 712-755, 771-787) – 12 daysILS:11.A.5c, 11.A.5d12.A.5a1.Plant Classification and Characteristics (29.1-30.30.3, pp. 573-604)2.Plant Organs (35.1-35.2, pp. 712-720)3.Primary and Secondary Growth (35.3-35.4, pp. 721-727)4.Transport in Plants (36.1-36.3, 36.5, pp. 738-748, 751-755)5.Transpiration (36.4, pp. 749-750)6.Pollination (38.1, pp. 771-775)7.Seed Formation (38.2, pp. 776-780)8.Asexual Propagation (38.3, pp. 781-782)9.Plant Biotechnology (38.4, pp. 783-787)Labs/Activities: Plant Cells Lab, AP Lab 9: TranspirationUnit 7 – Animal Form and Function (chapters 33-34, 40, 42-44, 48, pp. 638-709, 820-843, 867-942, 1011-1044) – Remaining timeILS:12.A.5a1.Animal Classification and Characteristics (33.1-34.8, pp. 638-709)2.Homeostasis (40.4-40.5, pp. 831-843)3.Circulation and Gas Exchange (42.1-42.7, pp. 867-897)4.Immune System (43.1-43.5, pp. 898-921)5.Excretion (44.3-44.5, pp. 928-937)6.Nervous System (48.1-48.7, pp. 1011-1044)Labs/Activities: AP Lab 10: Circulatory Physiology, Cat DissectionCourse: Integrated Life Science____________________________________________________Course Description: Integrated Life Science is a hands-on, laboratory based course designed to explore the fundamental principles of the life sciences.? Students will develop an understanding of the basic life science topics, include cellular structure and function, genetics, and anatomy and physiology.? In addition, the course will explore and integrate the more broad based topics in both the life and physical sciences, including forensic science, health, ecology, animal behavior and toxicology.? Integrated Life Science students will also continue to develop critical thinking and laboratory skills necessary for success in future science courses as well as in college coursework.Prerequisite: Enrollment open to Sophmores, Juniors, and Seniors.Textbook: Teacher created supplemental materials in the form of a lab manual for each unit.Grading Scale: 97 & above A+, 96-93 A, 92-90 A-, 89-87 B+, 86-83 B, 82-80 B-, 79-77 C+, 76-73 C, 72-70 C-, 69-67 D+, 66-63 D, 62-60 D-, 59-0 FCourse Outline:Unit 1 – Thinking Like a Scientist (20 days)ILS:11.A.4a, 4b, 4c, 4d, 4e, 4f11.B. a, 4b, 4c, 4d, 4e, 4f13A.4b, 4c, 4d, 13B.4a, 4b, 4c, 4e11.A.5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 11.B.5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 5e12A.5a13.A.5a, 5b, 5c,5dLab SafetyDevelopment of Line, bar and Pie GraphsInterpreting GraphsScientific MethodologyMetric System ConversionsMaking Useful ObservationsUsing Deductive ReasoningLabs/Activities: Learning to See, Penny Lab, I’m Clueless Lab, Using Deductive Reasoning, Scientific Method Flashcard Problems, Simpson Scientific Method Problems, Scientific Method Flashcard Problems, What Influences our Observations Lab, Termite Lab, Metrics Measuring Devices Lab, On the Scene Lab, Locard’s Principle LabUnit 2 – Organization of the Human Body (14 days)ILS: 11.A.4a, 4b, 4c12.A.4a, 4b, 4c12.B.4a13.A.4c, 4b11.A.5a, 5c12.A. 5a13.A. 5b, 5cMicroscope Overview and UsageCell TheoryEukaryotic vs. Prokaryotic CellsCell Organelles Cell BoundariesMovement of Cellular ParticlesLabs/Activities: Cells Alive Internet Activity, Cells Library Quest, Cell Analogies Collage, Interactive Microscope Lab, Comparing Plant and Animal Cell Lab, Diffusion Lab, What is the Ideal Cell Size LabUnit 3- Genetics (40 days)ILS: 11.A. 4a, 4b, 4c, 4d, 4e11.B.4a, 4b, 12.A.4a, 4b, 4c, 12.B.4a13.A.4c13.B.4b,4c11.A.5a, 5c, 5d11.B.5a, 5b12.A.4a, 4b, 4c12.B.4a13.A.4c, 4bDNA’s structure Inherited TraitsMolecular ClocksEvolutionPatterns of InheritancePunnet Squares Creating and Interpreting PedigreesGene technology (electrophoresis, karyotyping, proteonomics etc.)Protein SynthesisGenetic MutationsGenetic DisordersLab/Activities: DNA Origami, The Eternal Onion Lab, Forensic Files Video, Nova-Cracking the Code of Life Video, DNA Workshop Activity, Great Traits Activity, Trial of Life Video, DNAi Our Family Tree Web Quest, Slow Children at Play Punnet Square Worksheet, 2-Factor Punnet Square Practice Problems, Mendalian Genetics Worksheet, What Type Are You Lab, Practice Problems in Mendalian Genetics, Pedigree practice Problems Worksheet, I am My own Grandpa Song and Pedigree, Interpreting Pedigrees, Pedigree Symbols, Famous Freckles Lab, Buccal Swab Lab, Internet Search Activity, DNA Profiling Case Study, DNA Protein Synthesis Quick Check, Say it with DNA Worksheet, Transcription and Translation Internet Activity, Gender Determination for the 2004 United earth Games Activity, Connecting the Dots-DNA to Disease Acitivy, Karyotyping worksheet, Forensic Chemist and Forensic Crime Scene Expert Guest Speakers, Who Licked the Lollipop, Proteonomics LabUnit 4- Integumentary System (14 days)ILS: 11.A.4a, 4b, 4c, 4d, 4e11.B.5a11.B.4b, 4e, 12.A.4a, 4b, 4c13.A.4b, 4c, 13.B.4b, 4c11.A.5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 11.B.5a, 5c, 5e12.A.5a, 5b, 12.C.5b13.A.5c13.B.5c, 5eLayers of SkinHair AnalysisFingernailsFingerprinting TechniquesChromatography Lab/Activities: Testing Sensory Receptors for Touch Lab, The Thief Who Wore Lipstick Lab, Bleeding Mixtures, Studying Your Fingerprints, Is It A Match, Forensic Files Video, Comparing Latent Fingerprint Techniques, Soaking up Sun worksheet, Trace Evidence Hair, Science Sleuth Untangling a Hairy Dognapping Lab, Hair and Fiver Evidence Webquest Unit 5- The Nervous System (35 days)ILS: 11.A.4a, 4b, 4c, 4e12.A.4a, 4b12.C.4a13.A.4b, 13.B.4a, 4b, 4d 11.A.5a, 5b, 5c 12.A.5a,5b 12.C.5b 13.B.5a, 5d, 5eAnatomy and Physiology of Nervous System (Brain and Spinal Cord)Anatomy and Physiology of a Nerve Wave Properties and Types of WavesProperties of Sound: Frequency, Pitch, Amplitude, ResonanceAnatomy and Physiology of the Human EarProperties of Light: Reflection, Refraction, Interference, ColorAnatomy and Physiology of the Human EyeLight and Lenses: How Corrective Lenses WorkAnatomy and Physiology of the Tongue and Taste BudAnatomy and Physiology of the Nose and Olfactory BulbBioaccumulationToxicologyControlled Substances and their Affects on Your Nervous SystemLabs/Activities: ICT Results Article, Nervous System Game, Nervous System Article Summary and w.s., Axon Labeling, The Neuron Summary Worksheet, The Central Nervous System Summary Worksheet, The Peripheral Nervous System Summary Worksheet, Brain Labeling, Dr. Oz Video, Brain Surgery Video, Observing Nervous Responses Lab, Chemoreception: The Chemistry of Odors Article, Game over Senses, Animals Are Super Smellers lab, Nose Labeling, Exploring the Sense of Taste Lab, Taste Video, Where’s the Flavor Lab, Taste bud Labeling, Focus on Your Eyes Article, Determining Pitch, Exploring Sounds Lab, How the Human Ear Works w.s., Ear Labeling, How We See Lab, The Eyes Have It Lab, Eye Dissection, Electromagnetic Spectrum Worksheet, Silent Spring Chapter 20 Article, Lead Testing Lab, Basic Toxicology Lab Stations, Forensic Files VideoUnit 6 – Plants (Supplemental Materials) - 33 daysILS: 11.A.5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 5e 12.B.5a, 5b 12.B.5cPlant Cell OrganellesEvolution of PlantsReproductive Cycles of the Divisions of PlantsProcess of PhotosynthesisPlant Structure {Flower, Stem, Root, and Leaf)Monocot vs. DicotEcological/Environmental Role of PlantsWater and Nutrient Transport in PlantsLabs/Activities: Webquests: Fossil Preservation, Early Land Plants, Plant Structure, Origin of Seed Plants, and Illuminating Photosynthesis, field trip to Missouri Botanical Gardens and Powder Valley Nature Center, Seeds and Flowering Plants Lab, What do the Inside Parts of Roots Look Like? Lab, What does a Woody Stem Look Like Inside? Lab, Chromatography Lab, and Photosynthesis Lab.Course: Environmental ScienceCourse Description: Environmental Science is designed to introduce the student to the interrelationship of man and his natural environment. The course provides the student with a background study of Ecology, renewable vs. nonrenewable resources, biomes, field ecology, environmental issues, and interactions between living and non-living units of ecosystems. Calculation, evaluation, and use of basic statistics, and proper use of the scientific method are emphasized throughout the course. Semester one topics include man’s environmental historical impacts, making and evaluating environmental decisions, plate tectonics, global warming, water cycle, evolution by natural selection, biodiversity, mineral cycling, energy transfer and food webs, succession, and land biomes. Semester two topics include aquatic biomes, population ecology, human population trends, maintaining biodiversity/extinction trends, water management/ pollution, air pollution, ozone depletion, land use/land management, sustainable agriculture, mining and nonrenewable resources, renewable resources as alternatives, landfill and hazardous waste, human health concerns and biohazards, and environmental politics. Prerequisites:Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Successful completion of a first year physical science course AND successful completion of a first year math classTextbook: Environmental Science by Karen Arms, Ph.D.; Holt, Rinehart & Wilson, 2006Grading Scale: 97 & above A+, 96-93 A, 92-90 A-, 89-87 B+, 86-83 B, 82-80 B-, 79-77 C+, 76-73 C, 72-70 C-, 69-67 D+, 66-63 D, 62-60 D-, 59-0 FCourse Outline:Unit 1 - Introduction to Environmental Science (chapters 1-3) – 40 daysILS:11A5a-e12E4a13A4a13A5a-dUnderstanding Our Environment (pp1-15)The Environment and Society (pp16-21)Scientific Methods (pp31-37)Statistics and Models (pp38-44)Making Informed Decisions (pp45-49)The Geosphere (pp59-66)The Atmosphere (pp67-72)The Hydrosphere and the Biosphere (pp.73-81)Labs/Activities/Projects: Hunter/Gatherer Project, Soil Studies Lab, Effects of Water Quality on Macro Invertebrates Activity, Head Circumference and Hand Span Measurements Lab, Where Do You Stand? Activity, Decision Making Model Group Scenarios, Marianas Trench Webquest, ppm Concentration Lab, Modeling the Atmosphere Activity, Classification Field WorkUnit 2 – Ecology (chapters 4 -7) – 55 daysILS:11A5a-e11B5a-c12A4c, 5b12B4a, 5a, b12E4a-b12E513A4c1.Ecosystems: Everything is Connected (pp93-96)2.Evolution (pp97-101)3.The Diversity of Living Things (pp102-107)4.Energy Flow in ecosystems (pp17-123)5.The Cycling of Materials (pp124-128)6.How Ecosystems Change (pp.129-133)7.What is a Biome? (pp.143-145)8.Forest Biomes (pp.146-154)9.Grassland, Desert, and Tundra Biomes (pp.155-163)10.Freshwater Ecosystems (pp.173-178)11.Marine Ecosystems (pp.179-185)Labs/Activities/Projects: Conceptual Model of an Ecosystem, Extinction Timeline, Making Cladograms, Marco-Evolution Activity, The Great Fossil Hunt Activity, Animal Behavior Labs, Energy Flow Through an Ecosystem, Owl Pellets Lab, Calculating Land Area for Your DietUnit 3 – Populations(chapters 8-10) – 10 daysILS:11A5a-d12B4a-b12B5a-b13B4c1.How Populations Change in Size (pp.197-202)2.How Species Interact with Each Other (pp.203-209)3.Studying Human Populations and Population Trends (pp.219-231)4.Biodiversity and Biodiversity at Risk (pp.241-251)Labs/Activities/Projects: Human Population Growth Lab, Scatteraction Game Activity, Eutrophication LabUnit 4 – Water, Air, and Land (chapter 11) – 10 daysILS:11A5a-d12B5a-b13B4c-d13B5b-c1.Water Resources (pp.269-275)2.Water Use and Management (pp.276-283)3.Water Pollution (pp.284-293)Labs/Activities/Projects: Bioremediation Lab, Personal Water Usage Lab, Water as a Resource Research ProjectUnit 5 – Mineral and Energy Resources (chapters 16-19) – 43 daysILS:11A5a-e12C5a-b12E4a12E513B4a-e13B5a-e1.Minerals and Mineral Resources (pp.411-414)2.Mineral Exploration and Mining (pp.415-420)3.Mining Regulations and Mine Reclamation (pp.421-425)4.Energy Resources and Fossil Fuels (pp.435-443)5.Nuclear Energy (pp.444 – 447)6.Renewable Energy Today (pp.457-465)7.Alternative Energy and Conservation (pp.466-471)8.Solid Waste (pp.481-487)9.Reducing Solid Wastes (pp.488-492)10.Hazardous Waste (pp.493-499)Labs/Activities/Projects: Reading River Sediments, Copper Ore Extraction Lab, Chip off the Ole Block Lab, Rock Cycle Lab, Household Energy Consumption Lab, Fossil Fuel Map Quest, The Half Life of ‘X’, Energy Game Boards Project, Wind Turbine Lab, Solar Home Testing Lab, Calories in Sunlight Lab, Do Landfills Really Work, Recyclable Grocery Store Scavenger Hunt (Field Trip), Resin Separation LabCumulative Research PaperFirst Semester10 daysILS:13A4a-d13A5b-dUse of scientific periodicals to research student-desired environmental topic is stressed. Student establishes outline of key concepts and derives support for those key concepts using acceptable articles. Student evaluates the communication process of publishing scientific work. Also, compares and contrasts various findings within the realm of their chosen topic.Course: Human Anatomy & PhysiologyCourse Description: Human Anatomy & Physiology is an intensive college-level course for the able and ambitious student interested in the medical sciences who has successfully completed a first course in biology. The aim of this course is to provide the average to above-average student with the concepts, facts and skill necessary to deal with the rapidly changing science of human anatomy & physiology. The extensive laboratory work involved is designed to encourage problem solving and reinforces the concepts presented in class. This one-year course moves through the human body system by system, focusing on both normal and abnormal functioning.Prerequisites: Honors Biology I with a “C” or better or Biology I with a B or better or Biology 1 teacher recommendation.Textbook: Hole’s Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology, 9th Edition by David Shier, Jackie Butler, and Ricki Lewis, 2006Grading Scale: 97 & above A+, 96-93 A, 92-90 A-, 89-87 B+, 86-83 B, 82-80 B-, 79-77 C+, 76-73 C, 72-70 C-, 69-67 D+, 66-63 D, 62-60 D-, 59-0 FCourse Outline:Unit 1 – Levels of Organization (chapter 1, 5, 2, 4, 15) – 29 daysILS:11.A.5a, 5b, 5c12.A.5a12.C.5a1.Introduction to Anatomy & Physiology (1.2-1.4, pp. 2-4)2.Homeostasis (1.5, pp. 5-7)anization of the Body & Anatomical Terminology (1.6-1.7, pp. 8-17)4.Tissues (5.1-5.6, pp. 92-109)anic Compounds (2.3, pp. 39-46)6.Metabolic Reactions (4.2-4.3, pp. 75-77)7.Utilization of Organic Compounds in the Body (15.11, pp. 412-416)8.Calorie and Energy Balance (15.11, pp. 418-422)Labs/Activities: Gummy Bear Cuts & Planes, Dill Pickle Autopsy, Triage, Organic Molecule Testing, Identification of an Unknown Enzyme, Calorimetry, Ideal Weight Calculation, Fast Food NutritionUnit 2 – Support and Movement (chapters 6-8) – 27 daysILS:11.A.5a12.A5a1.Skin and Its Tissues (6.1, pp.113-116)2.Accessory Organs (6.2, pp. 117-119)3.Homeostasis of Body Temperature (6.3, pp.120)4.Bone Tissue, Structure and Growth (7.2-7.3, pp. 126-129)5.Bone Function (7.4, pp. 130-133)6.Bone Identification (7.5-7.12, pp. 133-154)7.Joints (7.13, pp.154-159)8.Structure of Skeletal Muscle (8.2, pp. 169-172)9.Skeletal Muscle Contraction & Response (8.3-8.4, pp. 173-180)10.Smooth Muscle & Cardiac Muscle (8.5-8.6, pp. 181-183)11.Skeletal Muscle Actions (8.7, pp. 184)12.Skeletal Muscle Identification (8.8, pp. 184-197)Lab/Activities: Body Temperature Lab, Muscle Fatigue Lab, Chicken Wing Physiology LabUnit 3 – Integration and Coordination (chapters 9-10) – 20 daysILS:11.A.5a12.A.5a1.Nervous System Introduction and Functions (9.1-9.2, pp. 203-204)2.Nervous System Cells (9.3-9.4, pp. 205-209)3.Membrane Potential and Impulses (9.5-9.6, pp. 210-213)4.Reflex Arcs (9.10, pp. 218-220)5.Central Nervous System Organs (9.11-9.13, pp. 220-232)6.Autonomic Nervous System (9.15, pp. 237-242)7.Somatic Senses (10.1-10.3, pp. 249-252)8.Special Senses (10.4-10.9, pp. 253-273)Labs/Activities: Right Brain/Left Brain, Sheep Brain Dissection, Cow Eye DissectionUnit 4 – Cell Reproduction and Cancer (teacher authored resources) – 6 daysILS: 12.A.5a1.Mitosis2.Factors Contributing to Cancer3.Cancer TreatmentsLabs/Activities: View and Discuss, “Cancer Warrior” Video, Faces of CancerUnit 5 – Transport (chapters 12-13) – 17 daysILS:11.A.5a12.A.5a1.Blood (12.1-12.5, pp. 303-320)2.Structure and Function of the Heart (13.1-13.3, pp. 324-336)3.Blood Vessels (13.4, pp. 337-357)Labs/Activities: Blood Typing, Cholesterol Screening, Exercise and Blood Pressure Lab, Virtual Cardiology LabUnit 6 – Genetic Disorders (teacher authored resources) – 19 daysILS:12.A.5a, 5b13.B.5b, 5d, 5e1.Meiosis2.Human Inheritance3.Protein Synthesis4.Genetic Disorders and TestingLabs/Activities: Disease Scenarios, Genetic Cancer Diagnosis Using Electrophoresis, Gender Testing in Athletes Virtual LabUnit 7 – Absorption and Excretion (chapters 15-17) - 24 days ILS:11.A.5a12.A.5a1.Structures and Functions of the Digestive System (15.1-15.10, pp. 386-412)2.Digestive Secretions (15.4-15.10, pp. 392-412)3.Vitamins and Minerals (15.11, pp. 416-418)4.Structures and Functions of the Respiratory System (16.1-16.2, pp. 429-435)5.Breathing (16.3-16.4, pp. 436-441)6.Gas Exchange and Transport (16.5-16.6, pp. 443-448)7.The Kidneys (17.2, pp.454-458)8.Urine Formation and Elimination (17.3-17.4, pp. 459-471)Labs/Activities: Long Volume, Lung Model, Simulated Kidney Function, Simulated UrinalysisUnit 8 – Immunity and Disease (chapter 14 and teacher authored resources) – 18 daysILS: 12.A.5b1.Structures and Functions of the Lymphatic System (14.1-14.5, pp. 361-364)2.Thymus and Spleen (14.6, pp. 365-366)3.Immunity (14.7, pp. 367-381)4.The Origin of Disease5.The Spread of DiseaseLabs/Activities: Disease Dice, Outbreak!, Bacterial Gram Staining, Virtual Bacteria IDUnit 9 – Comparative Anatomy – (teacher authored resources) – 8 daysILS:1.Fetal Pig DissectionIllinois Learning Standards for ScienceGoal 11 – Inquiry and Design90Goal 12 – Concepts and Principles92Goal 13 – Science, Technology, and Society96STATE GOAL 11: Understand the processes of scientific inquiry and technological design to investigate questions, conduct experiments and solve problems.Why This Goal Is Important: The inquiry process prepares learners to engage in science and apply methods of technological design. This understanding will enable students to pose questions, use models to enhance understanding, make predictions, gather and work with data, use appropriate measurement methods, analyze results, draw conclusions based on evidence, communicate their methods and results, and think about the implications of scientific research and technological problem solving.A. Know and apply the concepts, principles and processes of scientific inquiry.Early ElementaryLate ElementaryMiddle/Junior High SchoolEarly High SchoolLate High School11.A.1a Describe an observed event.11.A.2a Formulate questions on a specific science topic and choose the steps needed to answer the questions.11.A.3a Formulate hypotheses that can be tested by collecting data.11.A.4a Formulate hypotheses referencing prior research and knowledge.11.A.5a Formulate hypotheses referencing prior research and knowledge.11.A.1b Develop questions on scientific topics.11.A.2b Collect data for investigations using scientific process skills including observing, estimating and measuring.11.A.3b Conduct scientific experiments that control all but one variable.11.A.4b Conduct controlled experiments or simulations to test hypotheses.11.A.5b Design procedures to test the selected hypotheses.11.A.1c Collect data for investigations using measuring instruments and technologies.11.A.2c Construct charts and visualizations to display data.11.A.3c Collect and record data accurately using consistent measuring and recording techniques and media.11.A.4c Collect, organize and analyze data accurately and precisely.11.A.5c Conduct systematic controlled experiments to test the selected hypotheses.11.A.1d Record and store data using available technologies.11.A.2d Use data to produce reasonable explanations.11.A.3d Explain the existence of unexpected results in a data set.11.A.4d Apply statistical methods to the data to reach and support conclusions.11.A.5d Apply statistical methods to make predictions and to test the accuracy of results.11.A.1e Arrange data into logical patterns and describe the patterns.11.A.2e Report and display the results of individual and group investigations. 11.A.3e Use data manipulation tools and quantitative (e.g., mean, mode, simple equations) and representational methods (e.g., simulations, image processing) to analyze measurements.11.A.4e Formulate alternative hypotheses to explain unexpected results.11.A.5e Report, display and defend the results of investigations to audiences that may include professionals and technical experts.11.A.1f Compare observations of individual and group results.11.A.3f Interpret and represent results of analysis to produce findings.11.A.4f Using available technology, report, display and defend to an audience conclusions drawn from investigations.11.A.3g Report and display the process and results of a scientific investigation.B. Know and apply the concepts, principles and processes of technological design.Early ElementaryLate ElementaryMiddle/Junior High SchoolEarly High SchoolLate High School11.B.1a Given a simple design problem, formulate possible solutions.11.B.2a Identify a design problem and propose possible solutions.11.B.3a Identify an actual design problem and establish criteria for determining the success of a solution.11.B.4a Identify a technological design problem inherent in a commonly used product.11.B.5a Identify a design problem that has practical applications and propose possible solutions, considering such constraints as available tools, materials, time and costs.11.B.1b Design a device that will be useful in solving the problem.11.B.2b Develop a plan, design and procedure to address the problem identifying constraints (e.g., time, materials, technology).11.B.3b Sketch, propose and compare design solutions to the problem considering available materials, tools, cost effectiveness and safety.11.B.4b Propose and compare different solution designs to the design problem based upon given constraints including available tools, materials and time. 11.B.5b Select criteria for a successful design solution to the identified problem.11.B.1c Build the device using the materials and tools provided.11.B.2c Build a prototype of the design using available tools and materials.11.B.3c Select the most appropriate design and build a prototype or simulation. 11.B.4c Develop working visualizations of the proposed solution designs (e.g., blueprints, schematics, flowcharts, cad-cam, animations).11.B.5c Build and test different models or simulations of the design solution using suitable materials, tools and technology.11.B.1d Test the device and record results using given instruments, techniques and measurement methods.11.B.2d Test the prototype using suitable instruments, techniques and quantitative measurements to record data.11.B.3d Test the prototype using available materials, instruments and technology and record the data.11.B.4d Determine the criteria upon which the designs will be judged, identify advantages and disadvantages of the designs and select the most promising design.11.B.5d Choose a model and refine its design based on the test results.11.B.1e Report the design of the device, the test process and the results in solving a given problem.11.B.2e Assess test results and the effectiveness of the design using given criteria and noting possible sources of error.11.B.3e Evaluate the test results based on established criteria, note sources of error and recommend improvements.11.B.4e Develop and test a prototype or simulation of the solution design using available materials, instruments and technology.11.B.5e Apply established criteria to evaluate the suitability, acceptability, benefits, drawbacks and consequences for the tested design solution and recommend modifications and refinements.11.B.2f Report test design, test process and test results.11.B.3f Using available technology, report the relative success of the design based on the test results and criteria.11.B.4f Evaluate the test results based on established criteria, note sources of error and recommend improvements.11.B.5f Using available technology, prepare and present findings of the tested design solution to an audience that may include professional and technical experts. 11.B.4g Using available technology, report to an audience the relative success of the design based on the test results and criteria. STATE GOAL 12: Understand the fundamental concepts, principles and interconnections of the life, physical and earth/space sciences.Why This Goal Is Important: This goal is comprised of key concepts and principles in the life, physical and earth/space sciences that have considerable explanatory and predictive power for scientists and non-scientists alike. These ideas have been thoroughly studied and have stood the test of time. Knowing and being able to apply these concepts, principles and processes help students understand what they observe in nature and through scientific experimentation. A working knowledge of these concepts and principles allows students to relate new subject matter to material previously learned and to create deeper and more meaningful levels of understanding.A. Know and apply concepts that explain how living things function, adapt and change.Early ElementaryLate ElementaryMiddle/Junior High SchoolEarly High SchoolLate High School12.A.1a Identify and describe the component parts of living things (e.g., birds have feathers; people have bones, blood, hair, skin) and their major functions.12.A.2a Describe simple life cycles of plants and animals and the similarities and differences in their offspring.12.A.3a Explain how cells function as “building blocks” of organisms and describe the requirements for cells to live.12.A.4a Explain how genetic combinations produce visible effects and variations among physical features and cellular functions of organisms.12.A.5a Explain changes within cells and organisms in response to stimuli and changing environmental conditions (e.g., homeostasis, dormancy).12.A.1b Categorize living organisms using a variety of observable features (e.g., size, color, shape, backbone).12.A.2b Categorize features as either inherited or learned (e.g., flower color or eye color is inherited; language is learned).12.A.3b Compare characteristics of organisms produced from a single parent with those of organisms produced by two parents.12.A.4b Describe the structures and organization of cells and tissues that underlie basic life functions including nutrition, respiration, cellular transport, biosynthesis and reproduction.12.A.5b Analyze the transmission of genetic traits, diseases and defects.12.A.3c Compare and contrast how different forms and structures reflect different functions (e.g., similarities and differences among animals that fly, walk or swim; structures of plant cells and animal cells).12.A.4c Describe processes by which organisms change over time using evidence from comparative anatomy and physiology, embryology, the fossil record, genetics and biochemistry.B. Know and apply concepts that describe how living things interact with each other and with their environment.Early ElementaryLate ElementaryMiddle/Junior High SchoolEarly High SchoolLate High School12.B.1a Describe and compare characteristics of living things in relationship to their environments.12.B.2a Describe relationships among various organisms in their environments (e.g., predator/prey, parasite/host, food chains and food webs).12.B.3a Identify and classify biotic and abiotic factors in an environment that affect population density, habitat and placement of organisms in an energy pyramid.12.B.4a Compare physical, ecological and behavioral factors that influence interactions and interdependence of organisms.12.B.5a Analyze and explain biodiversity issues and the causes and effects of extinction.12.B.1b Describe how living things depend on one another for survival.12.B.2b Identify physical features of plants and animals that help them live in different environments (e.g., specialized teeth for eating certain foods, thorns for protection, insulation for cold temperature).12.B.3b Compare and assess features of organisms for their adaptive, competitive and survival potential (e.g., appendages, reproductive rates, camouflage, defensive structures).12.B.4b Simulate and analyze factors that influence the size and stability of populations within ecosystems (e.g., birth rate, death rate, predation, migration patterns).12.B.5b Compare and predict how life forms can adapt to changes in the environment by applying concepts of change and constancy (e.g., variations within a population increase the likelihood of survival under new conditions).C. Know and apply concepts that describe properties of matter and energy and the interactions between them.Early ElementaryLate ElementaryMiddle/Junior High SchoolEarly High SchoolLate High School12.C.1a Identify and compare sources of energy (e.g., batteries, the sun).12.C.2a Describe and compare types of energy including light, heat, sound, electrical and mechanical.12.C.3a Explain interactions of energy with matter including changes of state and conservation of mass and energy.12.C.4a Use kinetic theory, wave theory, quantum theory and the laws of thermodynamics to explain energy transformations.12.C.5a Analyze reactions (e.g., nuclear reactions, burning of fuel, decomposition of waste) in natural and man-made energy systems.12.C.1b Compare large-scale physical properties of matter (e.g., size, shape, color, texture, odor).12.C.2b Describe and explain the properties of solids, liquids and gases.12.C.3b Model and describe the chemical and physical characteristics of matter (e.g., atoms, molecules, elements, compounds, mixtures).12.C.4b Analyze and explain the atomic and nuclear structure of matter.12.C.5b Analyze the properties of materials (e.g., mass, boiling point, melting point, hardness) in relation to their physical and/or chemical structures.D. Know and apply concepts that describe force and motion and the principles that explain them.EarlyElementaryLate ElementaryMiddle/Junior High SchoolEarly High SchoolLATE HIGH SCHOOL12.D.1a Identify examples of motion (e.g., moving in a straight line, vibrating, rotating).12.D.2a Explain constant, variable and periodic motions.12.D.3a Explain and demonstrate how forces affect motion (e.g., action/reaction, equilibrium conditions, free-falling objects).12.D.4a Explain and predict motions in inertial and accelerated frames of reference.12.D.5a Analyze factors that influence the relative motion of an object (e.g., friction, wind shear, cross currents, potential differences).12.D.1b Identify observable forces in nature (e.g., pushes, pulls, gravity, magnetism).12.D.2b Demonstrate and explain ways that forces cause actions and reactions (e.g., magnets attracting and repelling; objects falling, rolling and bouncing).12.D.3b Explain the factors that affect the gravitational forces on objects (e.g., changes in mass, distance).12.D.4b Describe the effects of electromagnetic and nuclear forces including atomic and molecular bonding, capacitance and nuclear reactions.12.D.5b Analyze the effects of gravitational, electromagnetic and nuclear forces on a physical system.E. Know and apply concepts that describe the features and processes of the Earth and its resources.Early ElementaryLate ElementaryMiddle/Junior High SchoolEarly High SchoolLate High School12.E.1a Identify components and describe diverse features of the Earth’s land, water and atmospheric systems.12.E.2a Identify and explain natural cycles of the Earth’s land, water and atmospheric systems (e.g., rock cycle, water cycle, weather patterns).12.E.3a Analyze and explain large-scale dynamic forces, events and processes that affect the Earth’s land, water and atmospheric systems (e.g., jetstream, hurricanes, plate tectonics).12.E.4a Explain how external and internal energy sources drive Earth processes (e.g., solar energy drives weather patterns; internal heat drives plate tectonics).12.E.5 Analyze the processes involved in naturally occurring short-term and long-term Earth events (e.g., floods, ice ages, temperature, sea-level fluctuations).12.E.1b Identify and describe patterns of weather and seasonal change.12.E.2b Describe and explain short-term and long-term interactions of the Earth’s components (e.g., earthquakes, types of erosion).12.E.3b Describe interactions between solid earth, oceans, atmosphere and organisms that have resulted in ongoing changes of Earth (e.g., erosion, El Nino).12.E.4b Describe how rock sequences and fossil remains are used to interpret the age and changes in the Earth.12.E.1c Identify renewable and nonrenewable natural resources.12.E.2c Identify and classify recyclable materials.12.E.3c Evaluate the biodegradability of renewable and nonrenewable natural resources.F. Know and apply concepts that explain the composition and structure of the universe and Earth’s place in it.Early ElementaryLate ElementaryMiddle/Junior High SchoolEarly High SchoolLate High School12.F.1a Identify and describe characteristics of the sun, Earth and moon as familiar objects in the solar system.12.F.2a Identify and explain natural cycles and patterns in the solar system (e.g., order of the planets; moon phases; seasons as related to Earth’s tilt, one’s latitude, and where Earth is in its yearly orbit around the sun).12.F.3a Simulate, analyze and explain the effects of gravitational force in the solar system (e.g., orbital shape and speed, tides, spherical shape of the planets and moons).12.F.4a Explain theories, past and present, for changes observed in the universe.12.F.5a Compare the processes involved in the life cycle of stars (e.g., gravitational collapse, thermonuclear fusion, nova) and evaluate the supporting evidence.12.F.1b Identify daily, seasonal and annual patterns related to the Earth’s rotation and revolution.12.F.2b Explain the apparent motion of the sun and stars.12.F.3b Describe the organization and physical characteristics of the solar system (e.g., sun, planets, satellites, asteroids, comets).12.F.4b Describe and compare the chemical and physical characteristics of galaxies and objects within galaxies (e.g., pulsars, nebulae, black holes, dark matter, stars).12.F.5b Describe the size and age of the universe and evaluate the supporting evidence (e.g., red-shift, Hubble’s constant).12.F.2c Identify easily recognizable star patterns (e.g., the Big Dipper, constellations).12.F.3c Compare and contrast the sun as a star with other objects in the Milky Way Galaxy (e.g., nebulae, dust clouds, stars, black holes).STATE GOAL 13: Understand the relationships among science, technology and society in historical and contemporary contexts.Why This Goal Is Important: Understanding the nature and practices of science such as ensuring the validity and replicability of results, building upon the work of others and recognizing risks involved in experimentation gives learners a useful sense of the scientific enterprise. In addition, the relationships among science, technology and society give humans the ability to change and improve their surroundings. Learners who understand this relationship will be able to appreciate the efforts and effects of scientific discovery and applications of technology on their own lives and on the society in which we live.A. Know and apply the accepted practices of science.Early ElementaryLate ElementaryMiddle/Junior High SchoolEarly High SchoolLate High School13.A.1a Use basic safety practices (e.g., not tasting materials without permission, “stop/drop/roll”).13.A.2a Demonstrate ways to avoid injury when conducting science activities (e.g., wearing goggles, fire extinguisher use).13.A.3a Identify and reduce potential hazards in science activities (e.g., ventilation, handling chemicals).13.A.4a Estimate and suggest ways to reduce the degree of risk involved in science activities.13.A.5a Design procedures and policies to eliminate or reduce risk in potentially hazardous science activities.13.A.1b Explain why similar results are expected when procedures are done the same way.13.A.2b Explain why similar investigations may not produce similar results.13.A.3b Analyze historical and contemporary cases in which the work of science has been affected by both valid and biased scientific practices.13.A.4b Assess the validity of scientific data by analyzing the results, sample set, sample size, similar previous experimentation, possible misrepresentation of data presented and potential sources of error.13.A.5b Explain criteria that scientists use to evaluate the validity of scientific claims and theories.13.A.1c Explain how knowledge can be gained by careful observation.13.A.2c Explain why keeping accurate and detailed records is important.13.A.3c Explain what is similar and different about observational and experimental investigations.13.A.4c Describe how scientific knowledge, explanations and technological designs may change with new information over time (e.g., the understanding of DNA, the design of computers).13.A.5c Explain the strengths, weaknesses and uses of research methodologies including observational studies, controlled laboratory experiments, computer modeling and statistical studies.13.A.4d Explain how peer review helps to assure the accurate use of data and improves the scientific process.13.A.5d Explain, using a practical example (e.g., cold fusion), why experimental replication and peer review are essential to scientific claims.B. Know and apply concepts that describe the interaction between science, technology and society.Early ElementaryLate ElementaryMiddle/Junior High SchoolEarly High SchoolLate High School13.B.1a Explain the uses of common scientific instruments (e.g., ruler, thermometer, balance, probe, computer).13.B.2a Explain how technology is used in science for a variety of purposes (e.g., sample collection, storage and treatment; measurement; data collection, storage and retrieval; communication of information).13.B.3a Identify and explain ways that scientific knowledge and economics drive technological development.13.B.4a Compare and contrast scientific inquiry and technological design as pure and applied sciences.13.B.5a Analyze challenges created by international competition for increases in scientific knowledge and technological capabilities (e.g., patent issues, industrial espionage, technology obsolescence).13.B.1b Explain how using measuring tools improves the accuracy of estimates.13.B.2b Describe the effects on society of scientific and technological innovations (e.g., antibiotics, steam engine, digital computer).13.B.3b Identify important contributions to science and technology that have been made by individuals and groups from various cultures.13.B.4b Analyze a particular occupation to identify decisions that may be influenced by a knowledge of science.13.B.5b Analyze and describe the processes and effects of scientific and technological breakthroughs.13.B.1c Describe contributions men and women have made to science and technology.13.B.2c Identify and explain ways that science and technology influence the lives and careers of people.13.B.3c Describe how occupations use scientific and technological knowledge and skills.13.B.4c Analyze ways that resource management and technology can be used to accommodate population trends.13.B.5c Design and conduct an environmental impact study, analyze findings and justify recommendations.13.B.1d Identify and describe ways that science and technology affect people’s everyday lives (e.g., transportation, medicine, agriculture, sanitation, communication occupations).13.B.2d Compare the relative effectiveness of reducing, reusing and recycling in actual situations.13.B.3d Analyze the interaction of resource acquisition, technological development and ecosystem impact (e.g., diamond, coal or gold mining; deforestation).13.B.4d Analyze local examples of resource use, technology use or conservation programs; document findings; and make recommendations for improvements.13.B.5d Analyze the costs, benefits and effects of scientific and technological policies at the local, state, national and global levels (e.g., genetic research, Internet access).13.B.1e Demonstrate ways to reduce, reuse and recycle materials.13.B.2e Identify and explain ways that technology changes ecosystems (e.g., dams, highways, buildings, communication networks, power plants).13.B.3e Identify advantages and disadvantages of natural resource conservation and management programs.13.B.4e Evaluate claims derived from purported scientific studies used in advertising and marketing strategies.13.B.5e Assess how scientific and technological progress has affected other fields of study, careers and job markets and aspects of everyday life.13.B.2f Analyze how specific personal and societal choices that humans make affect local, regional and global ecosystems (e.g., lawn and garden care, mass transit).13.B.3f Apply classroom-developed criteria to determine the effects of policies on local science and technology issues (e.g., energy consumption, landfills, water quality). ................
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