Reading and Note Taking Study Guide

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World War I and the 1920sLesson 1 America Enters World War I Key Terms Alsace-LorrainemilitarismWilliam IIWestern FrontcasualtiescontrabandU-boatsLusitaniaZimmermann noteAcademic Vocabularyally: person, nation, or group joined with another for a common purposebelligerent: angry and aggressivefortify: to strengthen a military position by building defenses such as walls and trenchesstockpile: a large supply of something that is kept for future useultimatum: a final threat in which force or punishment will be used if a person, group, or country does not comply with the demandsLesson ObjectivesIdentify the causes of World War I.Analyze the impact of technological innovations in weaponry that resulted in stalemate on the Western Front. Analyze reasons behind isolationism and neutrality in the United States before 1917.Explain why the United States entered the conflict on the side of the Allies.The Causes of World War I: Text1.Paraphrase The text calls Europe a “powder keg” in the years leading up to World War I. Explain what this phrase means and why Europe was considered a powder keg. pare and Contrast Compare and contrast how Great Britain and Germany prepared their military forces for war. 3. Summarize How did the formation of the Triple Alliance and the Triple Entente make an already tense situation in Europe even more explosive? The Great War Begins: Text4.Identify Supporting Details? Explain at least three reasons why Germany invaded Belgium and then France in July of 1914. 5.Use Visual Information? Use the photograph on page 4 of “The Great War Begins” and the quote from French officer Paul Truffaut to explain why poison gas was considered to be worse than traditional weapons like tanks, guns, and artillery. 6.Identify Cause and Effect Why did the Western Front in World War I turn into a stalemate? Why were there so many more casualties in World War I than in earlier wars? The United States Remains Neutral: Text7.Categorize? Use the graphic organizer below to take notes on the three distinct positions in the United States toward the war in Europe.Reasons for U.S. Entry into the War: Text8.Draw Inferences Why did the United States find Germany’s U-boats more problematic than the British naval blockade? 9. Explain an Argument Why did the Germans believe that the bombing of the Lusitania was justified? Why were the British outraged by this event? 10.Draw Conclusions Why did Americans find the Zimmermann note so threatening? ................
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