ECI: Making It Work Conclusion - Learning Stream Login

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ECI: Making It Work Conclusion8. Conclusion8.1 CongratulationsNotes:MIW Coach:Congratulations! You've worked through all stages of the ECI journey, from referral and initial contact, to transition. You completed all the learning activities within the module and developed the necessary knowledge and skills to begin working with children and families as an ECI professional.8.2 Where are they nowNotes:MIW Coach:In this module you helped Andre, Elizabeth and Riley, as well as their families, through each stage of their ECI journey. So you might be wondering -- how are things going for them now? Let’s find out! Andre is 5 years old. He transitioned from his foster family back to his birth family. Andre’s birth mom has followed through on her required parenting classes. Andre is attending Pre K at Head Start. Andre and his mom are also involved with the Parent’s as Teachers home visiting program. Although Andre and his mom have moved a few times, Parent’s as Teachers has followed them and continues to provide ongoing support. Andre continued to receive ECI services until he turned 3, but does not currently have a need for therapy services. He is receiving educational services through Head Start and the Parents as Teachers program. Elizabeth is 3 years old. She has just transitioned from ECI. She is attending an inclusive preschool program at the school in her neighborhood. Children who are enrolled in PPCD attend the program, as well as typically developing children. Elizabeth attends the program for the entire day. A special education teacher comes to the preschool classroom to provide instruction and to support the preschool teacher for part of the day. Elizabeth receives speech and occupational therapy in the preschool classroom from the school as well as from a home health agency. Elizabeth has had frequent ear infections. She is scheduled to have surgery to place PE tubes in two weeks. Elizabeth’s mom, Susie, is three months pregnant. She is involved with the Down Syndrome Association of Central Texas. Riley is 6 years old. Riley transitioned from ECI to PPCD. For the past two years, he attended an early childhood special education class at his local school and also received services through the HHSC Autism program. This school year, Riley is in a regular kindergarten class with a part time aid to support him. Riley receives speech and occupational therapy from the school and also goes to private speech therapy at a clinic. Riley’s mom, Adelia, is very active with Texas Parent to Parent.8.3 ObservationNotes:MIW Coach:So your MIW caseload is officially complete. But as you know, before you can receive an ECI caseload, you must complete three observations and one demonstration during this orientation process. At this point, you may have already done these. If not, consult with your supervisor for more information about scheduling and debriefing.Use the form to record thoughts and questions when you observe the three service delivery sessions. The form can also be used by a supervisor or other staff member to provide you with feedback on your demonstration. Here is the link for the form: {07D0901F-86B6-4CD0-B7A2-908BF5F49EB0}_59/Observation_Form_Serv_Delivery.docx. 8.4 OutreachNotes:MIW Coach:Remember, all ECI staff are responsible for explaining ECI services to the public, and each opportunity in which you interact professionally is an opportunity to promote the program and talk about what makes ECI unique. Public outreach occurs when you are working with families or referral sources such as physicians and the medical community, childcare providers, and social service and government agencies ... even when you talk to colleagues at a conference. It’s important to tailor your message to your audience; for example, when speaking with physicians about ECI, discuss the program in terms of its research base. Let them know that data show the earlier intervention can be provided to a child, the better the outcomes for that child's development. All ECI staff are ambassadors. Question: What should you highlight about ECI when talking to families? Answer: Consider sharing with families how ECI services are unique. For example: Services are individualized based on the unique needs of the child and family.The Service Provider will coach, teach, and support caregivers as they help their child grow and develop. Services occur in natural environment, and in the context of everyday routines8.5 Professional DevelopmentNotes:MIW Coach:As an early intervention professional, you can maintain and enhance the knowledge and skills you need for your work through ongoing professional development. This ensures you will keep pace with the standards and practices in your field, and you will continue to provide the best possible services to children and families.The MIW bookshelf is a collection of materials and links that you've used throughout the module, and now it can serve as a valuable resource to you ongoing. We discussed this at the very beginning of Making It Work. Take a look and keep growing.8.6 MIW BookshelfTX Rule and Federal Regs:TX Rule: $ext.ViewTAC?tac_view=4&ti=40&pt=2&ch=108 Code of Federal Regulations: and FERPA: The 7 Key Principles:Looks Like/ Doesn’t Look Like: An elaboration on the 7 key principles, including descriptions of what each principle looks like and doesn't look like in practice. The link is here: Research: An annotated bibliographic database contains the literature that supports the seven key principles. The link is here: Agreed Upon Practices: Validated practices from first contact through transition. The link is here: Key Principles and Effective Practices: Crosswalk of the seven key principles with effective early intervention practices and position statements from professional organizations. The link is here: {07D0901F-86B6-4CD0-B7A2-908BF5F49EB0}_59/KeyPrinciplesEI_effectivepractices.pdf Child Development:Texas Early Learning Council Guidelines: Guidelines to help families and caregivers understand what very young children should know and be able to do at different points in their development. Also incorporates strategies to support development from birth to 18 months. The link is here: Infant and Toddler Connection of Virginia - Typical Child Development: Reviews infant and toddler developmental milestones and the ages when these are typically mastered, within the context of the three global outcomes. The link is here: Tumbleon Milestones: Organizes developmental milestones by age and by area of development. It provides milestone information by week through the first three months. The link is here: Understanding Infant and Toddler Development: In this 2-hour course, participants learn about developmental patterns in infancy and toddlerhood, strategies for encouraging optimal development, and how to recognize signs of developmental delays in very young children. The link is here: Library Matters: Child Development: A list of resources available for loan through the ECI Collection at the DSHS library, including books, videos, and online materials. The link is here: Additional Resources by Section:Providing Early Intervention Services in Natural Environments: An article describing Natural Environment Intervention and Team-Based Services with a focus on services provided by Speech-Language Pathologists. The link is here: Self-Regulation in Working with Families: An article discussing what relationships providers have with families, who the hero of the visit really is, and the Hoosiers Rule. The link is here: SST Workbook: Information essential to delivering effective SST. The workbook extends the EIS’s knowledge of developmentally appropriate activities for infants and toddlers. The link is here: {07D0901F-86B6-4CD0-B7A2-908BF5F49EB0}_59/SST_Workbook_Final.docx ECI Collection at the DSHS Library: Includes videos, books, assessment instruments, audio tapes, and journals concerning children who have disabilities or developmental delays. These materials are available on a free loan basis to residents of the state of Texas. The link is here: ECI Training:What staff are saying about ECI Training:“The training went over exactly what providers need to know in order to be able to provide better services.”“I loved this webinar! The presenter's knowledge was above and beyond what I expected to learn.” The link for the ECI Training and TA page is here: . Early Intervention Association and Blogs: DEC - The Division for Early Childhood: Promotes policies and advances evidence-based practices that support families and enhance the optimal development of young children (0-8) who have or are at risk for developmental delays and disabilities. Check out the DEC recommended practices. The link is here: . ECTA - The Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center: Funded by OSEP to improve state early intervention and early childhood special education service systems, increase the implementation of effective practices, and enhance the outcomes of these programs. The link is here: Early Intervention Strategies: Tips and strategies you can use when working with families of infants and toddlers with special needs within the context of their everyday routines. The link is here: Center on the Developing Child (Harvard): Drives science-based innovation that achieves breakthrough outcomes for children facing adversity. Check out their videos on: brain architecture, serve & return, executive function, and toxic stress. Zero to Three: A national nonprofit organization that provides parents, professionals and policymakers the knowledge and the know-how to nurture early development. The link is here: Cultural Competence:Cultural Competence: It All Starts at the Front Desk: An article that speaks on behalf of families and their first encounters with various service providers when they approach the “front desk.” Includes examples of assumptions made about them and their families based on race, name origin, culture etc. (Source: National Center for Cultural Competence). The link is here: {07D0901F-86B6-4CD0-B7A2-908BF5F49EB0}_59/Front_Desk.pdf Knowing Who You Are: A three-part curriculum for social workers and other professionals in the child welfare system. Created with the direct collaboration of alumni of foster care, youth still in care, birth parents, and resource families, the curriculum helps child welfare professionals explore race and ethnicity, preparing them to support the healthy development of their constituent’s racial and ethnic identity. The link is here: Library Matters - Cultural Competence: Explore a variety of resources such as DVDs, articles, journals, and CDs on cultural competence and bilingual language development.Supervisor Guidelines: Content is in development. 8.7 The EndYou have now finished all sections and activities for Making It Work. This is the end. Good luck! ................
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