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Student detailsYour NameOlympia XirosCourseBachelor of Education (Primary)Unit detailsUnit codeEDP140Unit nameAssessment for LearningYour TutorKya GravesAssessment detailsReport Topic Assessment Type: Intervention and ReportDue date16/07/2013Your word count2348Extension grantedYes / NoExtension dateIs this a resubmission?Yes / NoResubmission dateDeclarationI certify that the attached material is my original work. No other person’s work or ideas have been used without acknowledgement. Except where I have clearly stated that I have used some of this material elsewhere, I have not presented this for assessment in another course or unit at this or any other institution. I have retained a copy of this assessment. I have read and understand the Curtin University of Technology document Academic Integrity at Curtin: Student guidelines for avoiding plagiarism.Name/signatureOlympia XirosDate 16/07/2013ASSESSMENT FORMAT CHECKLIST / PLEASE HIGHLIGHT I have named my assessment correctly in the following style: Surname_Firstname_Student ID_EDxxx_Assessmentx.docYes / NoI have put in my Surname and Initial into the Header of this document.Yes / NoI have used Arial 11pt font, 1.5 spacing throughout my assessment.Yes / NoPlease note: Page 2 of this document contains the Assessment Rubric for your assessment; please begin typing your assessment on page 3.Assessment for Learning - Assessment 2 (50%)– Intervention Plan and Report – Assessment RubricCriteriaPossibleMarkUnsatisfactoryDevelopingCompetentHighly CompetentMarkStudent profile4Very brief outline, with little or no relevant information given. Satisfactory profile with some factors mentioned.Most aspects are mentioned. Detailed, succinct profile describing general abilities and circumstances and factors impacting on achievement.2Diagnostic phase Identification and description of the student’s level of proficiency in relation to the Australian Curriculum - either English or Mathematics 5Brief, limited or inaccurate description of student’s level of proficiency. Description of process unsatisfactory or missing. Limited or no references to readings. Limited or no connection to the Australian Curriculum. Limited, inappropriate or no student work samples/evidence included.Satisfactory description of student’s level of learning. Satisfactory description of process. Minimal references to readings. Minimal connection to the Australian Curriculum. Some work samples/evidence included and some references to readings.Clear description of the student’s level of proficiency. Clear description of process. Appropriate references to readings and connection to the Australian Curriculum. Appropriate work samples/evidence included.Clear and detailed description of the student’s level of proficiency and how it was identified, including the processes used. A variety/wide variety of appropriate scholarly references used. Strong connection to Australian Curriculum. Variety/wide variety of student work samples/evidence included.2.5Lesson Plan 10The lesson plan is missing or incomplete. Limited description of initial ability, learning targets, teaching and learning strategies and assessment tools. Little or no links between sections – identified level, Australian Curriculum, learning targets, teaching and learning strategies, formative and summative assessment. No reflection or insufficient ponents of the lesson plan have been addressed in some detail. Satisfactory description of initial ability, learning targets, teaching and learning strategies and assessment tools to be used. Links between identified level, Australian Curriculum, learning targets, teaching and learning strategies, formative and summative assessment. Components of the lesson plan are described in detail. Clear description of initial ability, learning targets, teaching and learning strategies and assessment tools to be used. Clear links between identified level, Australian Curriculum, learning targets, teaching and learning strategies, formative and summative assessment. Components of the lesson plan are comprehensive and succinct. Proficient description of initial ability, learning targets, teaching and learning strategies and assessment tools to be used. Strong links between identified level, Australian Curriculum, learning targets, teaching and learning strategies, formative and summative assessment.5.5Reflection on the assessment cycle Analysis and evaluation of initial diagnosis, learning targets, formative and summative assessment15Limited discussion of the assessment cycle in terms of the learning targets, the learning that occurred and effectiveness of formative and summative assessment. Demonstrates an unsatisfactory understanding of concepts and the process. Little or no reference to supporting theory from unit reading.More depth needed in the discussion of what happened in terms of the learning targets, the learning that occurred and effectiveness of formative and summative assessment. Successes or otherwise not sufficiently explained. Some reference to supporting theory from unit readings.Sound reflection. Discussion of the process provided, discussing success or otherwise in terms of the learning targets, learning that occurred and effectiveness of formative and summative assessment. Discussion of formative assessment includes indication of changes that occurred in student learning and/or instruction. Appropriate reference to key unit readings.Critical reflection. Thoughtful discussion of the assessment cycle discussing success or otherwise of the learning that occurred in terms of the learning targets and effectiveness of formative and summative assessment. Demonstrates a highly competent understanding of the process and the distinction between formative and summative assessment. Strong reference to unit readings to support critical analysis.8Follow-up lesson6Limited reference to the learning that needs to occur next. Little or no reference to the Australian Curriculum. Little or no reference to supporting theory.Some indication of plans for follow-up lesson related to assessment cycle. Satisfactory connection to the Australian Curriculum. Some reference to supporting theory.Appropriate indication of plans for follow-up lesson clearly connected to assessment cycle. Appropriate connection to the Australian Curriculum. Appropriate references to supporting theory.Clear, detailed indication of plan for follow-up lesson with a strong link to the assessment cycle. Strong/very strong connection to the Australian Curriculum. Strong references to supporting theory.3Standard of academic writing includingAPA Referencing10Poorly presented/organised. Expression is unclear and generally lacks cohesion. Inadequate sentence structure. Frequent grammatical, spelling and/or punctuation errors. No references, few references, or major errors in references. Plagiarism evident. Little or no evidence of reading.Incorrect length.Satisfactory organisation/some deficiencies in structure. Presentation, grammar, spelling and/or punctuation need revision. Argument not developed in enough detail.References inaccurate or incomplete. Minimal in-text referencing used, but with APA style being followed. Minimal reference to unit anised appropriately and well presented. Minor errors in grammar, spelling and/or punctuation. Evidence of reference to a range of unit readings.Sound use of APA style throughout with appropriate in-text referencing, although may be some errors. Reference list presented according to APA standards.High/outstanding standard of presentation. Fluent/concise expression. Minimal/no errors in grammar, spelling, punctuation. Evidence/strong evidence of critical thinking supported by appropriate reference to wide range of suitable academic sources. Correct use of APA referencing style with no/very minor errors. 5GENERAL COMMENTMARK/GRADEI can see evidence of some research in this report Olympia. Unfortunately, what was missing was the analysis or discussion as to why certain things had occurred. There was no analysis of the diagnostic session. Similarly, your intervention lesson didn't really tell me why you chose what you did - and how you believed that was going to provide the outcome you wanted. It was good to see you link so closely to ACARA though - good stuff there!Make sure that you read all documentation that you are given for an assignment - especially the marking rubric - they are valuable in providing you with a thorough structure to follow. Please also look at your grammar/punctuation and syntax as this dragged down your last criteria to a pass mark. 26 /50 FAIL (<25) PASS (25-29) CREDIT (30-34) DISTINCTION (35-39) HIGH DISTINCTION (40+)Xiros, O.EDP140 – ASSESSMENT FOR LEARNINGASSESSMENT 2 – INTERVENTION PLAN AND REPORTOLYMPIA XIROS, 16498662SP 2, 2013 TABLE OF CONTENTS TOC \o "1-3" \h \z \u 1.0INTRODUCTION PAGEREF _Toc361751784 \h 22.0STUDENT PROFILE PAGEREF _Toc361751785 \h 23.0DIAGNOSTIC PHASE PAGEREF _Toc361751786 \h 34.0LESSON PLAN PAGEREF _Toc361751787 \h 45.0REFLECTION ON THE ASSESSMENT CYCLE PAGEREF _Toc361751788 \h 86.0FOLLOW UP LESSON PAGEREF _Toc361751789 \h 97.0CONCLUSION PAGEREF _Toc361751790 \h 108.0REFERENCES PAGEREF _Toc361751791 \h 119.0APPENDICES PAGEREF _Toc361751792 \h 12A.CONSENT FORM PAGEREF _Toc361751793 \h 12B.STUDENT SCHOOL REPORT - Extract PAGEREF _Toc361751794 \h 13C.ARRANGING TASK PAGEREF _Toc361751795 \h 15D.WORKSHEET 1 – BOOK REPORT PAGEREF _Toc361751796 \h 16E.WORKSHEET 2 - QUIZ PAGEREF _Toc361751797 \h 17INTRODUCTIONThe purpose of this report is to devise a lesson plan for a student who has been identified as being at sound level in English. The lesson plan will help the student achieve a higher level of competency in English in particularly in the Language area focusing on Text Structure and Organisation as defined by the Australian Curriculum (ACARA, 2011).Students’ sound level competency has been identified by the students’ teacher through classroom assessments in accordance with the Australian Curriculum (ACARA, 2011). The diagnostic activities performed by beginning student teacher consisted of a series of questions in relation to text structure and organisation. This diagnostic activity helped in identifying student level of understanding and what further instructions were needed to lift student from sound too high. The lesson plan will cover the Language Module of English, concentrating on Text Structure and Organisation. This report contains diagnostic activities undertaken, extract of school report and lesson plan. No teacher contact was made due to the fact that school holidays had commenced and the student is known to the beginning student teacher, thus parent was approached directly for viewing of school half yearly report.STUDENT PROFILEThe student is an eight year old who currently resides with both parents and one younger sibling. The student is bilingual with English being the predominating language spoken at home.The student attended day care prior to commencing formal schooling and is currently in Year 2. The students’ half yearly school report (Appendix B) indicates sound level for text structure and organisation in the English strand of the Australian Curriculum. The student also receives weekly lessons in parents’ language by teachers specialised in teaching language so thus is learning two languages at the same time. This may hinder student in achieving higher grades in English due to the importance placed at learning the other language.DIAGNOSTIC PHASEIn order to ascertain were the students’ knowledge of text structure and organisation in English needed improvement to take student from sound too high as defined by the Australian Curriculum (ACARA, 2011) the following diagnostic activities were identified by the beginning student teacher as required. According to First Steps (2013) gathering data provides ample basis for diagnostic. Ideally students work samples would have sufficed in determining areas covered and were improvement is needed to elevate student from sound too high in accordance with ACARA’s Year 2 Achievement Standard for English “by the end of Year 2 students understand how similar texts share characteristics by identifying text structures and language features used to describe characters, settings and events” (ACARA, 2011). Thus questioning the student on various aspects of text structure took place. Student was asked to identify fiction books that student has. Student indicated that they are story books not fiction books. Student was then asked if the home library contained any non-fiction books, student asked for clarification. To further complement questioning, performance task strategy was utilised. Performance task helped identify students’ writing ability and sentence structure. According to McMillan (2011, p. 234) citing Groeber (2007) this provides an authentic “student centered” sample.The interactive approach was used in identifying students reading capabilities and comprehension. The interactive approach uses “both whole words/stories and letter-sound associations” (Foreman, 2008a, p. 251). The novel selected was When Will It Rain by Kate Cumming. This picture book was used due to the fact that student showed an interest in the cover of the book. The student showed a lot of enthusiasm for reading. The students’ tone was monotonous but student was able to work out unfamiliar words without intervention. LESSON PLANLearning AreaYearLength of lessonDateEnglish240 min1/7/2013Topic/Lesson Title: Language: Text Structure and Organisation – Different text structure of Fiction and Non-Fiction Books Current level in relation to Australian Curriculum:Year 2 students should be able to understand the purpose of text, identify language features, images and vocabulary used to describe characters and events (ACARA, 2011). Lesson Plan is for student at sound or expected level of competence in accordance with Australian Curriculum.Link to the Australian Curriculum that learning target for this lesson is developed from:ACELA1463 - “Understand that different types of texts have identifiable text structures and language features that help the text serve its purpose:“Identifying the topic and type of a text through its visual presentation, for example cover design, packaging, title/subtitle and images;Becoming familiar with the typical stages of text types, for example simple narratives, instructions and expositions” (ACARA, 2011).Learning Target:By the end of the lesson the child will be able to:Identify the difference between fiction and non-fiction;How to identify the text structure in a simple narrative book.Write a Fiction Book Report identifying Book Title, Author, Illustrator, Publisher, Who, What, Where and Conclusion.Preparation/ResourcesPicture book Bambi 2 by Catherine McCaffertyFour each of Fiction and non-fiction books that student will be able to sort in Fiction and non-fiction piles.Book Report worksheet for student to complete to show comprehension of text in particular looking for signal words.Quiz WorksheetTeaching and Learning Strategies:Teaching: Input:Ask student what Fiction and Non-Fiction books are? Explain what is meant by Fiction and Non-Fiction.Ask student if student can see any visual differences.Modelling: Use books samples show student differences between text types.Show student index page and contents page in Non-Fiction books and chapter books (Fiction books).Read Bambi 2 by Catherine McCaffertyExplain signal words for cause and effect text types. Signal words such as why, as a result, because, so, since, effects and prehension: Check to ensure that student understands the differences between Fiction and Non-Fiction by asking student to explain what fiction and non-fiction books are.Check for student’s comprehension of Fiction and Non-Fiction by asking student to classify selected books into piles according to Fiction and Non-Fiction. Check students comprehension as too why index and contents pages may be helpful. Ask student why index page is used for.Ask student why contents pages are important.Ask students what type of books contain index and contents pages.Check students comprehension of book, what kind of book Bambi 2 by Catherine McCafferty is (in this lesson it is used to demonstrate simple narrative).Student to select own book and complete worksheet to show comprehension of text in particular looking for cause and effect signal words.Questioning Strategies: Bloom’s Taxonomy (McMillan, J. H., 2007, p.p. 43-46) is used to provide higher levels of thinking:Knowledge: Recalling and remembering – What are Fiction and Non-Fiction books?Comprehension: Explain what index and contents pages function is. Understanding differences of Fiction and Non-Fiction books. How to identify cause and effect in simple narrative books.Application:Demonstrate which books are Fiction and Non-Fiction books by placing in correct piles (also demonstrates comprehension of different type of text)Analysis: What simple narrative texts contain.Evaluating: Checking comprehension of terms Fiction and Non-Fiction books in particular simple narrative texts.Creating: Produce a Book Report.Formative Assessment: Both high level and low level formative assessment will be conducted, comprising of gathering evidence through informal observations, structured exercises, questioning and feedback during (high level) and after (low level) lesson will be used to assess learning and teaching; students participation and teacher-student interaction. (McMillan, J. H., 2011, p.101). These are broken down to:Start of Lesson:Do you know what Fiction and Non-Fiction Books are?Can you see any visual differences between Fiction and Non-Fiction Books?What are they?Why would we use a contents page?Why would we use an index page?During:Before reading Bambi 2 by Catherine McCafferty:Is this a Fiction or a Non-Fiction Book?What is some signal words used in the book?Before concluding lesson:What is the purpose of fiction books?What is the purpose of non-fiction books?Can you put these books into Fiction and Non-Fiction piles?During formative assessment adjustment to lesson plan may be required to ensure lesson objectives are met. This can be achieved seamlessly during questioning by modifying questions to achieve desired result.Feedback at all stages is important as it encourages and motivates students.Summative Assessment:Summative Assessment is conducted at the end of the lesson to show comprehension of lesson to ensure student has met the objectives of the lesson. In this lesson the worksheets completed at the end of instruction will be used for summative assessment. Appendix D is the Book Report student was asked to fill in after completion of the lesson. It asks the student to provide information about the book – book title, name of author, illustrator, setting, main character/s, cause, effect and conclusion. Appendix E is the short quiz conducted at the end of the lesson in which the student was asked to read and underline correct response to a series of questions based on the lesson.These worksheets form part of the summative assessment enabling judgement of students’ comprehension of lesson or whether further lessons are required to meet lesson objectives.Identification of learning that was achieved in relation to the learning target:Learning targets judge what students should know and be able to do (McMillan, 2011, p. 55). This can be depicted by measuring achievement of the learning target, McMillan (2011, p.63) by selected responses in the form of matching questions in the Appendix E, Quiz, and constructed-response in the form of oral questioning was observed in helping identify what learning targets were achieved.The following identifies learning of target achieved:Student was able to differentiate between fiction and non-fiction books. This is depicted in Appendix C whereby student has successfully arranged books in fiction and non-fiction piles.Student answered correctly questions posed to him: What is a fiction book?So then what is a non-fiction book?What is an index used for?What is a content page?Students produced book report with all but the country of origin field supplied (Appendix D)Student completed quiz with all but one question wrong (Appendix E). REFLECTION ON THE ASSESSMENT CYCLEIn the initial diagnostic phase of the report, selecting the appropriate diagnostic method to use was vital in identifying student’s needs. Utilising school report should not be the only method of determining needs, as the report does not show what was being covered in connection to learning area report focuses on. The schools learning objectives/goals have not been considered which plays an important part in developing lesson plans (McMillan, 2011, p. 29. The assessment cycle in order to be effective must consist of multiple measures that use more than one source of assessment method to enhance construct validity and decision validity (Brookhart, 2009). This can be achieved by providing student the opportunity to demonstrate understanding and comprehension of lesson through formative and summative assessment. Formative assessment is conducted during instruction by questioning understanding of what fiction and non-fiction books are. This enables monitoring of progress of student during instruction by informal observation, questioning to involve student in lesson in order to promote thinking and comprehension and is seamless and continuous (McMillan, 2011). In conducting the lesson, questions asked on reflection were too closed, requiring definition only, thus in effect not as effective as required with students’ answers not a true comprehension of learning (Popham, 2008).Summative assessment is conducted before closure in the form of a book report (Appendix D) and at end of lesson quiz (Appendix E). Summative assessments used in the lesson, enables assessment of what knowledge the student has acquired as a result of the lesson, in order to determine if the student has progression (Chappuis & Chappuis, 2007/8, pp. 14-19). As this lesson is not a standalone lesson, it can only determine/measure lesson presented.In terms of the learning targets both formative and summative assessments utilised at the time of writing lesson plan seemed appropriate. During instruction formative assessment also included feedback to students’ participation to encourage, motivate or seek further clarification was required. Summative assessment at the end of the lesson proved to be a ‘big hit’ with the student and this might be something to think about when planning next lesson. FOLLOW UP LESSONThe follow up lesson would expand on text structures by introducing and working on each descriptive text structures. Describing what descriptive text structures are and what signal words they use. Instruct students by modelling written paragraph and then having students write their own in the same text structure modelled. Once this is mastered, move on to other text structures in this order: sequence, problem and solution, cause and effect, and compare and contrast. All follow up lessons align with the Australian Curriculum English Strand for Year 2, Language – Text Structure and Organisation – ACELA1463 – “Understand that different types of texts have identifiable text structures and language features that help the text serve its purpose” (ACARA, 2011) and scaffold students learning in order for deep understanding of text structure and organisation to occur (McInerney and McInerney, 2005). Whilst encouraging student to promote greater understanding of text structure and organisation consideration must be taken on students’ zone of proximal development (Vygotsky, 1978). In other words, is the student ready to absorb next lesson.CONCLUSIONIn conclusion, diagnostics undertaken enable beginner student teacher to develop a lesson plan that will enable student to achieve a higher level of competency in text structure and organisation. The diagnostic activities enabled identification of area requiring further clarification in order to successfully progress. The lesson plan developed has direct links to the Australian Curriculum. Both formative and summative assessments conducted indicate effectiveness of lesson and reflected upon during the assessment cycle. Follow up lesson plan has been identified and presented. REFERENCESDepartment of Education WA. (2013). First steps. Linking assessment, teaching and learning. WA: Department of Education WA. Retrieved from . (2011). Retrieved July 10, 2012, from Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority: australiancurriculum.edu.auBrookhart, S. M. (2009). The many meanings of "multiple measures". Educational leadership, 67, pp. 6-12.Chappuis, S. and Chappuis, J. (2007/2008). The best value in formative assessment. Educational leadership, 65, pp. 14-19. Retrieved from , P. (2008). Inclusion in Action. In G. Robinson, Understanding literacy and numeracy (pp. 247-289). South Melbourne, Victoria: Thompson.Groeber, J. F. (2007). Designing and using rubrics for reading and language arts, K-6 (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.McCafferty, C. (2006). Bambi 2. Rowville, VIC: Funtastic Limited.McInerney, D. M. & McInerney, V. (1998). Educational psychology: constructing learning (2nd ed.). Australia: Prentice Hall Australia Pty Ltd.McMillan, J. H. (2007). Principles and practice for effective standards-based instruction. In Classroom assessment (pp. 43-46). Boston: Pearson. Retrieved from , J. H. (2011). Classroom Assessment - Principles and practice for effective standards-based instruction (5th ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson.Popham, W. J. (2008). Transformative Assessment. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Retrieved from , L. S. (1978). Mind in society: The development of higher psychological processes. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.APPENDICESCONSENT FORMSTUDENT SCHOOL REPORT - ExtractARRANGING TASK40100251565910Sample of 4 fiction and 4 non-fiction books020000Sample of 4 fiction and 4 non-fiction booksNon-Fiction PileFiction PileWORKSHEET 1 – BOOK REPORTWORKSHEET 2 - QUIZ ................
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