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EDUC 373 Unit Plan

Grade: 2nd

Content Area: Science

Essential Question: What is the life cycle and parts of a butterfly?

Step 1: What is the big idea you want your students to investigate?

I will have my students investigate the changes a butterfly throughout the stages of its life as well as the parts of a butterfly while explaining their understanding in a non-fiction story.

Step 2: What will the students know, understand and be able to do? (You may use the standards as a guide for this.)

• The students will be able to label and define the stages of a butterfly’s life.

• The students will be able to utilize their knowledge of the stages of a butterfly’s life and its body parts to write a short, non-fiction narrative.

• The students will be able to utilize the writing process to create a narrative.

• Students will be able to identify the differences between fiction and non-fiction stories.

Step 3: What questions will they be able to deeply answer after investigating this big idea?

1. What are the stages of a butterfly’s life?

2. What are the physical changes a butterfly goes through in the different stages of its life?

3. What are the different and important parts of a butterfly?

4. What is the writing process and how can it be used to write a story?

5. What is the differences between fiction and non-fiction stories?

Step 4: What can you identify as the specific content (or performance standards) that align to the knowledge and skills derived from successfully completing the unit?

• A.4.5: When studying a science-related problem, decide what changes over time are occurring or have occurred.

• C.4.6 Communicate the results of their investigations in ways their audiences will understand by using charts, graphs, drawings, written descriptions, and various other means, to display their answers

• F.4.3 Illustrate* the different ways that organisms grow through life stages and survive to produce new members of their type

• C.C.W.2.2 Write narratives in which they recount a well elaborated event or short sequence of events, include details to describe actions, thoughts, and feelings, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide a sense of closure.

• C.C.W.2.5 With guidance and support from adults and peers, focus on a topic and strengthen writing as needed by revising and editing.

Step 5: What specific performance tasks are you going to expect your students to be able to do at the end of this unit?

1. Students will be able to identify the stages of a butterfly’s life.

2. Students will be able to accurately label and explain the stages of the butterfly’s life in their own words.

3. Students will be able to label the parts of a butterfly.

4. Students will be able to utilize the writing process.

5. Students will be able to identify the differences between fiction and non-fiction stories.

Step 6: What summative assessment(s) will the students complete to show they can answer the essential questions?

Students will create a non-fiction story book on the stages of the butterflies, including parts of a butterfly.

Step 7: What will the evaluation tools (checklist, rating scale, or rubrics) look like that will be used to determine the level of performance on assessments?

• Checklist-Check if each student put at least one post-it note per side of the Venn-Diagram on the comparison posters. This can be done on a copy of the class list.

• Observation-Make sure students filled out the K and the W of their K-W-L Charts.

• Labeled Picture- The students understood and were able to label the stages of the butterfly’s life.

• K-W-L Chart-Make sure students have their entire K-W-L Chart is filled out.

• Teacher Observation and Checklist: Students participated in the memory game. Students turned in the poster of the glued memory pieces correctly connecting the colored butterfly part picture and the name and function card. If they had to make flash cards make sure there is enough for the group and they have them correct and finished.

• Check list- Students have made a small concept map (idea web) on their short story about the butterfly.

• Teacher Observation- Students understand and display the concept of prewriting and have started on their draft.

• Handed-in Stories- Students have handed in their stories with at least 5 corrections; this is to prove they were doing editing and revising.

• Handed-in Stories- Check students work, make sure they are done publishing, and they aren’t drawing irrelevant pictures.

• Rubric: Fill out the rubric as the students present and turn in their stories.

Step 8: What individual steps will students need to accomplish to be proficient on the summative assessment?

1. Students will need to be able to get the sequence of events correct in the butterfly’s life.

2. Students will need to be able to accurately describe the stages in their own words.

3. Students will need to have an understanding of the parts of a butterfly.

4. Students will need to use the writing process while creating their story.

5. Students will be able to identify the differences between fiction and non-fiction stories.

Step 9: What are the formative assessments that will be used to assess these individual steps?

1. Observe to see if they get the difference between fiction and non-fiction stories.

2. Observe if they got the sequence of the butterfly life cycle correct.

3. Observe if they know the important parts of the butterfly.

4. They correctly used the writing process.

Step 10: What self-assessments will the students use to determine if they are learning the content of the unit?

1. Can they put the stages of the butterfly’s life in correct order.

2. Can they identify parts of a butterfly.

3. Can they describe it in their own words.

4. Can they describe and use the writing process.

5. Can they identify the difference between the fiction and non-fiction stories.

Step 11: What are the lessons that you will use to effectively facilitate these individual steps to develop understanding of this unit?

• Differentiation of levels located in adaptations.

Lesson #1-Defining Non-Fiction Story and Pre-Assessment

Objectives:

Students will define a non-fiction story and compare it’s characteristics to a fiction story.

Essential Questions:

What is a non-fiction story?

What is the difference between a fiction and non-fiction story?

Materials Needed:

Large Post-it Notes

K-W-L Charts

2 Large posters (Venn-Diagram)

1 labeled Non-Fiction

1 labeled Fiction

Non-Fiction Mentor Text-

I'm a Caterpillar (Hello Reader! Science Series) by Jean Marzollo,

and Judith Moffatt’

OR

From Caterpillar to Butterfly by Deborah Heiligman and illustrated by Bari

Weissman

Fiction Mentor Text-

The Butterfly that Stamped by Rudyard Kipling and illustrated by Alan Baker

OR

The Butterfly garden by Judith Levicoff with Mark Steilen and illustrated by

Ben and Tina Garrison

Standards:

• A.4.5: When studying a science-related problem, decide what changes over time are occurring or have occurred.

• C.4.6 Communicate the results of their investigations in ways their audiences will understand by using charts, graphs, drawings, written descriptions, and various other means, to display their answers

• F.4.3 Illustrate* the different ways that organisms grow through life stages and survive to produce new members of their type

• C.C.W.2.2 Write narratives in which they recount a well elaborated event or short sequence of events, include details to describe actions, thoughts, and feelings, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide a sense of closure.

• C.C.W.2.5 With guidance and support from adults and peers, focus on a topic and strengthen writing as needed by revising and editing.

Prior Knowledge:

Students should know how to read and write.

Procedure:

1. As a whole group talk about what makes a story a non-fiction story.

2. Read one of the non-fiction books.

3. Have them write down 2 characteristics of a non-fiction story they noticed in the book in their notebooks.

4. Have them choose one of the characteristics and write it on the post-it. When they are done have them put it on that side of the diagram.

5. Then talk about what makes a story a fiction.

6. Read one of the fiction books.

7. Have them write down 2 characteristics of a fiction story they noticed in the book in their notebooks.

8. Have them choose one of the characteristics and write it on the post-it. When they are done have them put it on that side of the diagram.

9. Then, as a class, decide 2 similarities between the 2 different types of stories.

10. Then hand out the K-W-L charts.

11. Have them fill out the “Know” and the “Want to know” about butterflies. Have them hang on to it for next lesson.

Adaptations:

• If students are unable to come up with different post-it notes allow them to put it up anyways.

• If students are at a higher level allow them to do more post-it notes.

Assessment:

Checklist-Check if each student put at least one post-it note per side of the Venn-Diagram on the comparison posters. This can be done on a copy of the class list.

Observation-Make sure students filled out the K and the W of their K-W-L Charts.

[pic]

Lesson #2-Learning the Stages of the Butterfly

Objective:

Students will explore and understand the stages of a butterfly’s life.

Essential Questions:

What are the stages of a butterfly’s life?

Materials Needed:

Writing Utensil

Non-Fiction Mentor Text-

I'm a Caterpillar (Hello Reader! Science Series) byJean Marzollo,

and Judith Moffatt’

From Caterpillar to Butterfly By Deborah Heiligman, and Bari

Weissman (Illustrator)

Stages of Butterfly’s Life Worksheet

Strips of the stages of butterfly’s life in envelopes (5)

K-W-L Chart

Standards:

A.4.5: When studying a science-related problem, decide what changes over time are occurring or have occurred.

C.4.3 Select multiple sources of information to help answer questions selected for classroom investigations.

F.4.3 Illustrate* the different ways that organisms grow through life stages and survive to produce new members of their type.

Prior Knowledge:

Students need to know how to read, write, and think critically.

Procedure:

1. Read the non-fiction mentor text about the stages of a butterfly.

2. Have students get into groups of 4-6.

3. Hand out the “stages of a butterfly” strips of paper and the handout to groups of students.

4. Have the students put the strips in order from stage 1 on.

5. Have them fill out the “Stages of a Butterfly” sheet in their groups after they get their strips approved.

6. Then have them fill out the rest of their K-W-L chart.

7. Come back as a group after everyone is done with their sheets and review the stages of a butterfly.

8. Then have students fill out the “Learned” part of their K-W-L Chart and hand them in.

Adaptations:

• If the student is unable to identify the stages of a butterfly from the story have them look through the story with the strips to help them work through it. If a bigger group of students cannot distinguish the stages, go through the strips as a class with the students still in their groups.

• For higher level students have them not only label the picture but explain the stage on the picture as well.

Assessment:

Labeled Picture- The students understood and were able to label the stages of the butterfly’s life.

K-W-L Chart-Make sure students have their entire K-W-L Chart is filled out.

Stages of a Butterfly Strips

Stage 1: The Egg

The egg is a tiny, round, oval object, usually with fine ribs and other small structures. The female attaches the egg to leaves, stems, or other objects, usually on or near the intended caterpillar food.

Stage 2: The Caterpillar (Larva)

The caterpillar (or larva) is the long, worm-like stage of the butterfly or moth. It often has an interesting pattern of stripes or patches, and it may have spine-like hairs. It is the feeding and growth stage.

Stage 3: The Chrysalis (Pupa)

The chrysalis (or pupa) is the transformation stage within which the caterpillar tissues are broken down and the adult insect's structures are formed. The chrysalis of most species is brown or green and blends into the background. Many species overwinter in this stage.

Stage 4: The Adult (Imago)

The adult (or imago) is colorful butterfly or moth usually seen. It is the reproductive and mobile stage for the species. The adults undergo courtship, mating, and egg-laying. The adult butterfly or moth is also the stage that migrates or colonizes new habitats.

NAME________________________________________________________________________

Label the stages of the butterfly life cycle next to the picture.

[pic]

Lesson #3 Parts of a Butterfly

Objectives:

Students will identify parts of a butterfly and explore the purpose of different parts of a butterfly’s body.

Essential Questions:

What are the parts of the butterfly?

What are the functions of the different parts of the butterfly?

Materials Needed:

Memory Pieces of the colored butterfly body parts and their matching functions

(Enough boards for groups of 2-4)

Labeled sheet for them to study

(handed out after they complete activity; Instruction Picture)

Medium sized poster board

Glue or Tape

Labeled picture of butterfly parts for whole class instruction (Instruction Picture)

Writing utensil

Chalkboard/Whiteboard

Writing utensil for the class board

Document Camera or Overhead Projector

Standards:

• A.4.5: When studying a science-related problem, decide what changes over time are occurring or have occurred.

• C.4.6 Communicate the results of their investigations in ways their audiences will understand by using charts, graphs, drawings, written descriptions, and various other means, to display their answers

• F.4.3 Illustrate* the different ways that organisms grow through life stages and survive to produce new members of their type

• C.C.W.2.2 Write narratives in which they recount a well elaborated event or short sequence of events, include details to describe actions, thoughts, and feelings, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide a sense of closure.

• C.C.W.2.5 With guidance and support from adults and peers, focus on a topic and strengthen writing as needed by revising and editing.

Prior Knowledge:

Students should know how to use glue or tape. Students should also know how to read and write.

Procedure:

1. Explain the parts of a butterfly as a class. Let them try to figure out the functions by asking questions

a. (What do you think that could be used for? Why do you think it is important for a butterfly to have that? Do we have a part similar to that of the butterfly?)

2. Break the students up into groups of 2-4, depending on class size. If there are fewer students try groups of 2; if there is a large class try groups of 3 or 4.

3. Model the Memory game on the board or with the actual pieces and model how they should paste the matches to the poster boards.

a. Memory is played by flipping the cards on the fronts so you cannot see what is on them. For this game the students need to match the card with the colored body part and match it with the card that says the body part and its function.

b. (ie: if the wings are colored the student must match the colored body part with the card that says “WINGS: the butterfly uses its wings to fly to and from different places. They are formed in its last stage of life.”)

4. Hand students their Memory pieces, glue/tape, and poster boards and let them play.

5. Explain that when they make a match they need to paste/tape the matches together on their posters.

6. When the students are done playing their games come back as a full group and review their boards.

Adaptations:

• If there is a large class, make larger groups. If there are large groups make sure to review as a class, more children per group could lead to less students getting the information they need!

• If there isn’t poster boards available have them tape the two memory sides together to make flash cards.

• If there isn’t a document camera or overhead projector then print off copies of the “Instruction Picture” and pass them out to each student before the activity.

• If the lower levels students are having trouble putting the memory cards together allow them to look at the instruction picture.

• For the higher level students, when they paste the memory cards together make them give an example of why the butterfly needs that part.

Assessment:

Teacher Observation and Checklist: Students participated in the memory game. Students turned in the poster of the glued memory pieces correctly connecting the colored butterfly part picture and the name and function card. If they had to make flash cards make sure there is enough for the group and they have them correct and finished.

Memory Game

| | | | |

|Legs- All adult butterflies have | | |Abdomen- The abdomen is the |

|six legs. The two forelegs of some|Forewing- The fore wings are the |Hind wing- The hind wings are the |segmented tail area of an insect |

|butterfly species are tiny. |two upper wings. |two lower wings. |that contains the heart, |

| | | |reproductive organs, and most of |

| | | |the digestive system. |

| | | |Antennae- An antenna is attached |

|Thorax- The thorax is the body |Proboscis- Adult butterflies sip |Eye- The eye helps the butterfly |to the head of adult insects. |

|section between the head and the |nectar and other liquids from |see. |Antennae are used for the sense of|

|abdomen. The legs and wings attach|flowers using a spiral, straw-like | |smell and balance. Butterflies |

|to the thorax. |proboscis located on their head. | |have two antennae with clubs at |

| | | |the end. |

| | |[pic] |[pic] |

| |[pic] | | |

|Head- The part of the butterfly | | | |

|where the antennae, proboscis and,| | | |

|and eyes are located. | | | |

| | | | |

| |[pic] |[pic] |[pic] |

|[pic] | | | |

|[pic] |[pic] | | |

| | | | |

| | | | |

| | | | |

| | |RECYCLE |RECYCLE |

Instruction Picture

|Label the Butterfly | |

|Definitions |

|Abdomen - The abdomen is the tail area of an insect that contains the heart, |Head - The head is the part of the insect that contains the |

|reproductive organs, and most of the digestive system. |brain, two eyes, and the proboscis. The two antennae are |

|Antenna - An antenna is attached to the head of adult insects. Antennae are |attached to the head. |

|used for the sense of smell and balance. Butterflies have two antennae with |Hind wing - The hind wings are the two lower wings. |

|clubs at the end. |Leg - All adult butterflies have six legs. The two forelegs of |

|Compound Eye - Insect compound eyes are made up of many hexagonal lenses. |some butterfly species are tiny. |

|Fore wing - The fore wings are the two upper wings. |Proboscis - Adult butterflies sip nectar and other liquids |

| |using a spiral, straw-like proboscis located on their head. |

| |Thorax - The thorax is the body section between the head and |

| |the abdomen. The legs and wings attach to the thorax. |

[pic]

Lesson #4 Prewriting/Drafting of Story

Objectives:

Students will utilize the knowledge they have gained about butterflies and their lives and start the writing process by creating a short narrative story.

Essential Questions:

How do you begin to write a short narrative story?

What are the different steps of writing?

Materials Needed:

Notebook paper

Writing Utensil

Rubric explaining final project

Fiction/Non-Fiction Venn-diagram

Whiteboard/Chalkboard

Dry Erase marker/Chalk

Document Camera

Standards:

• A.4.5: When studying a science-related problem, decide what changes over time are occurring or have occurred.

• C.4.6 Communicate the results of their investigations in ways their audiences will understand by using charts, graphs, drawings, written descriptions, and various other means, to display their answers

• F.4.3 Illustrate* the different ways that organisms grow through life stages and survive to produce new members of their type

• C.C.W.2.2 Write narratives in which they recount a well elaborated event or short sequence of events, include details to describe actions, thoughts, and feelings, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide a sense of closure.

• C.C.W.2.5 With guidance and support from adults and peers, focus on a topic and strengthen writing as needed by revising and editing.

Prior Knowledge:

Students should know how to read and write.

Procedure:

1. Bring out the fiction/non-fiction Venn-diagram and quickly review what each are by asking students questions or letting them read off the chart.

a. (Who can tell me one thing about a fiction story? Who can tell me one thing about a non-fiction story? What is one difference between and fiction and non-fiction story?)

2. Hand out the rubric and explain the final project. Make sure to go through the rubric with the students.

a. Final Project: Students will make a non-fiction noisy story. They will create a short, non-fiction narrative about the stages of the butterfly, making sure to include its parts during those stages. Then, the students will present their stories.

3. Now explain the process of writing, letting the students know that they are going to be doing prewriting and drafting. Because they are doing prewriting and drafting during this lesson, make sure to explain those steps more thoroughly.

4. Next, hand out the concept map sheet and use the doc camera to fill it out as a class. Have the students fill out their map.

5. Next, after filling out the ideas, have students start to draft their short stories on notebook or loose leaf paper.

Adaptations:

• If students cannot write or read collect all of them together and work as a small group to come up with ideas and work together. Scribing for them might be necessary. If students are unable to write, have a printed version of the finished concept map to help them in their story building. It also might help to record them to hear their ideas and put them into words.

• If there isn’t a document camera or overhead then just use the board.

• For higher level students have them elaborate more on their sentences in their story to add detail.

Assessment:

Check list- Students have made a small concept map (idea web) on their short story about the butterfly.

Teacher Observation- Students understand and display the concept of prewriting and have started on their draft.

Rubric: Butterfly Story Name: ________________________________________________

| |Basic (1) |Proficient (2) |Advanced (3) |

|Content: Life Cycle |The story didn’t include or |The story explained the butterfly |The story included the butterfly |

| |accurately explain all of the |cycle. All of the content was true |cycle. The entire story about the |

| |butterfly life cycle. |in explaining the butterfly life |butterfly life cycle was true and |

| | |cycle. |accurately displayed. |

|Content: Parts of a Butterfly |The story included no parts of the |The story included 1-2 parts of the|The story included more than 2 |

| |butterfly. |butterfly. |parts of the butterfly. |

|Creativity and Neatness |The story wasn’t creative or neat. |The story was creative and neat. |The story was very creative and put|

| | | |together very nicely. |

|Format |The story was less than 4 sentences|The story was 4-7 sentences long. |The story was more than 7 sentences|

| |long. | |long. |

|Writing Process Participation |The student didn’t participate in |The student clearly participated in|The students clearly and actively |

| |part of the writing process. |the prewriting, drafting, revising,|participated in the prewriting, |

| | |editing, and publishing stage of |drafting, revising, editing, and |

| | |the writing process. |publishing stage of the writing |

| | | |process, showing growth in their |

| | | |writing. |

COMMENTS:

Concept Map:

[pic]

Lesson #5 Revising/Editing Story

Objective:

Students will utilize their knowledge of the butterfly life cycle and its parts to revise and edit a short narrative they have written.

Essential Questions:

How can you make your story better?

Is the story accurately portraying the butterfly life cycle and its parts?

Materials Needed:

Red and Blue pens

Document Camera

Sample Paragraph to model editing and revising

Standards:

• A.4.5: When studying a science-related problem, decide what changes over time are occurring or have occurred.

• C.4.6 Communicate the results of their investigations in ways their audiences will understand by using charts, graphs, drawings, written descriptions, and various other means, to display their answers

• F.4.3 Illustrate* the different ways that organisms grow through life stages and survive to produce new members of their type

• C.C.W.2.2 Write narratives in which they recount a well elaborated event or short sequence of events, include details to describe actions, thoughts, and feelings, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide a sense of closure.

• C.C.W.2.5 With guidance and support from adults and peers, focus on a topic and strengthen writing as needed by revising and editing.

Prior Knowledge:

Students must know how to read and write.

Procedure:

1. Explain the process of revising and editing.

a. Tell the students that first they go through their own work adding and deleting parts of their story as they revise. For today they will go through with a blue pen to revise their own work.

b. Then tell them they have someone else go through their work to make corrections and edit their story. For today they will have a partner go through with a red pen and edit their work.

2. Model this with one part of an example story. Use the document camera to model both revising and editing.

3. Next, have the students revise their works with a blue pen.

4. Then, have students hand in their revised stories and shuffle them. After they are shuffled hand them out, making sure no student ends up with their own. Have them edit that story with a red pen.

5. After editing have the students hand them in. Go over the stories, make corrections, and prepare to hand them back for students to publish in the next lesson.

Adaptations:

• If students are unable to or having trouble with revising or editing have them work together. If there are a few of them having trouble get them together and help them through the process. It might help to have them record themselves so they can hear, out loud, the problems that need to be edited.

• For higher level students have them switch with more than one person to practice more of their editing skills. Also, have them work with someone having problems so they can help someone while also learning more by teaching others.

Assessment:

Handed-in Stories: Students have handed in their stories with at least 5 corrections; this is to prove they were doing editing and revising.

Lesson #6 Publishing Story

Objective:

Students will utilize and display their understanding of both the life cycle of a butterfly and its parts as well as the writing process.

Essential Questions:

How do you conclude the writing process?

Materials Needed:

Story page sheets

Writing Utensil

Coloring Utensils

Standards:

• A.4.5: When studying a science-related problem, decide what changes over time are occurring or have occurred.

• C.4.6 Communicate the results of their investigations in ways their audiences will understand by using charts, graphs, drawings, written descriptions, and various other means, to display their answers

• F.4.3 Illustrate* the different ways that organisms grow through life stages and survive to produce new members of their type

• C.C.W.2.2 Write narratives in which they recount a well elaborated event or short sequence of events, include details to describe actions, thoughts, and feelings, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide a sense of closure.

• C.C.W.2.5 With guidance and support from adults and peers, focus on a topic and strengthen writing as needed by revising and editing.

Prior Knowledge:

Students must know how to read and write.

Procedure:

1. Hand students their stories and the book pages for them to fill out.

2. Have them write their stories on the book pages.

3. When students are done with their stories have them color pictures to enhance the story. The pictures must be related to the story.

Adaptations:

• If lower level students cannot read or write, put them in a group and work on them together. It might be helpful to record them so they can hear their ideas and write them down.

• For higher level students have them elaborate on their stories, making them longer. Also, require more pictures.

Assessment:

Handed-in Stories- Check students work, make sure they are done publishing, and they aren’t drawing irrelevant pictures.

[pic]

Lesson #7 Presenting Stories

Objective:

Students will display their knowledge on butterfly’s life cycle and their parts by sharing a short narrative they have composed.

Essential Questions:

How do the butterfly life cycle and its parts fit into a non-fiction narrative?

Materials Needed:

Student’s story

Rubric for grading

Standards:

• A.4.5: When studying a science-related problem, decide what changes over time are occurring or have occurred.

• C.4.6 Communicate the results of their investigations in ways their audiences will understand by using charts, graphs, drawings, written descriptions, and various other means, to display their answers

• F.4.3 Illustrate* the different ways that organisms grow through life stages and survive to produce new members of their type

• C.C.W.2.2 Write narratives in which they recount a well elaborated event or short sequence of events, include details to describe actions, thoughts, and feelings, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide a sense of closure.

• C.C.W.2.5 With guidance and support from adults and peers, focus on a topic and strengthen writing as needed by revising and editing.

Prior Knowledge:

Students must know how to read. Students must also have their stories done.

Procedure:

1. Hand out the rubric to each student and have them write their name on it. After all the names are written on the rubrics, have them pass it back in.

2. Mix up the papers and pick them one by one to pick the order of who presents.

3. Present until everyone has presented.

Adaptations:

• If lower level students had trouble, talk with them and assess them based on their effort and amount of work they had put into their story. If they are unable to present their noisy story allow them to read it to you or explain the affects they wanted to add.

• If a student doesn’t have it done have them turn it in late but subtract points.

• For higher level students have them also explain their pictures and the reasons they drew what they did.

Assessment:

Rubric: Fill out the rubric as the students present and turn in their stories.

Rubric: Butterfly Story Name: ________________________________________________

| |Basic (1) |Proficient (2) |Advanced (3) |

|Content: Life Cycle |The story didn’t include or |The story explained the butterfly |The story included the butterfly |

| |accurately explain all of the |cycle. All of the content was true |cycle. The entire story about the |

| |butterfly life cycle. |in explaining the butterfly life |butterfly life cycle was true and |

| | |cycle. |accurately displayed. |

|Content: Parts of a Butterfly |The story included no parts of the |The story included 1-2 parts of the|The story included more than 2 |

| |butterfly. |butterfly. |parts of the butterfly. |

|Creativity and Neatness |The story wasn’t creative or neat. |The story was creative and neat. |The story was very creative and put|

| | | |together very nicely. |

|Format |The story was less than 4 sentences|The story was 4-7 sentences long. |The story was more than 7 sentences|

| |long. | |long. |

|Writing Process Participation |The student didn’t participate in |The student clearly participated in|The students clearly and actively |

| |part of the writing process. |the prewriting, drafting, revising,|participated in the prewriting, |

| | |editing, and publishing stage of |drafting, revising, editing, and |

| | |the writing process. |publishing stage of the writing |

| | | |process, showing growth in their |

| | | |writing. |

COMMENTS:

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