First Grade Literacy Schedule

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|Monday |Tuesday |Wednesday |Thursday | |

|First Independent |Students are greeted every morning with interesting books of different genres, little books, copies of rhymes, etc. A time to warm-up for the more rigorous reading that follows. Students may|

|Reading |choose challenging books of high interest, easy books, or familiar big books. |

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|15 minutes | |

| |To generate interest in the classroom library| |Continue with different books from the classroom|Continue with different books from the classroom|

| |and for the teacher to “listen” in as |Give each group of students a selection of the |library. |library. |

| |students talk about books, (what they are |“surprise” books to look at and talk about. | | |

| |interested in etc,) this week “surprising” |Every few minutes rotate the books so that |These books may be left in baskets on tables. |These books may be left in baskets on tables. |

| |students with different books each day for |everyone gets a chance to look at all the books.| | |

| |them to look through. | |Listen in on the conversations, taking | |

| |Make sure the students have a chance to | |observational notes about students’ interests, | |

| |“touch” all or most of the books from the | |etc. | |

| |classroom library. | | | |

|Community Share | |Focus: Students can participate in discussions |Focus: Students can participate in discussions |Focus: Students can participate in |

| | |and connect experiences and ideas with those of |and connect experiences and ideas with those of |conversations and discussions and connect |

|15 minutes | |others. (“I can make a connection to your |others. |experiences and ideas with those of others. |

| | |story.”) |Students bring their own memory boxes/bags to | |

| | |Bring in a memory box of personal items to share|share over the course of the next few days. |Students bring their own memory boxes/bags to |

| | |about your life. | |share. |

| | | | | |

| | | |Introduce routines related to Community time; |Encourage connections through the conversations |

| | |Encourage students to make connections to your |how to come to the floor, etc. | |

| | |memories/treasures with their own stories. | | |

|Shared Reading | |Interactive Read Aloud |Interactive Read Aloud |Interactive Read Aloud |

|Interactive | |Lesson-Monitoring Comprehension/ Listening To |Lesson-Using Fix-up Strategies |Lesson-Using Fix-up Strategies continued |

|Read Aloud | |Your Inner Voice | | |

| | |Focus: Students can carry on an inner | |Focus: Students can use fix-up strategies when |

|30 minutes | |conversation with the text. |Focus: Students can use fix-up strategies when |reading doesn’t make sense. |

| | | |reading doesn’t make sense. | |

| | | | |Shared Reading-4 day plan |

| | |Shared Reading-4 day plan |Shared Reading-4 day plan |Students should be reading from a big book or |

| | |Students should be reading from a big book or |Students should be reading from a big book or |enlarged text each day. Repeated reading for |

| | |enlarged text each day. Repeated reading for |enlarged text each day. Repeated reading for |fluency as well as strategy instruction. |

| | |fluency as well as strategy instruction. |fluency as well as strategy instruction. |Link strategy focus from read aloud to shared |

| | |Link strategy focus from read aloud to shared |Link strategy focus from read aloud to shared |reading. |

| | |reading. |reading. | |

| | |Poems and songs are a good source for shared | | |

| | |reading. | | |

| |Monday |Tuesday |Wednesday |Thursday |

|Independent Reading | |Begin teaching routines and procedures for |Introducing Independent Reading |Independent Reading |

| | |literacy stations and independent reading. |Independent Reading Lesson-Selecting Books-Quiet|Lesson-How Readers Choose Books |

| | | |Reading | |

|Guided Reading | | | | |

| | | | |Focus: Students can choose their own books for |

|Independent Work | | |Focus: Students can participate in Independent |independent reading. |

| | | |Reading. | |

| | | | | |

|60 minutes | | | | |

| | | | | |

| | | | |Continue teaching routines and procedures for |

| | | |Continue teaching routines and procedures for |literacy stations and independent reading. |

| | | |literacy stations and independent reading. | |

| |Administer Summer School Assessment |

| |Students continue to read and go to work stations |

|Word Study | |Focus: Students can blend the vowel sound with |Focus: Students can blend the vowel sound with |Focus: Students can understand that some words |

| | |r. |r. |have a vowel, a consonant, and a silent e. |

|15 minutes | | | | |

| | | | |Lesson: Week One |

| | |Lesson: Week One |Lesson: Week One | |

|Independent Writing |. | | | |

| | |Begin testing today with a read aloud selected |Interactive Read Aloud Lesson-Writers Get Ideas |Interactive Read Aloud |

| | |by grade level to which students can make |When I Was Young In The Mountains |Lesson- Ideas Continued “Popcorn” |

|45 minutes | |connections and gets ideas for writing. | | |

| | |Students write independently.- |Focus: Students can get ideas from the | |

| | | |connections they make to the stories they hear |Focus: Students can get ideas from their own |

| | | |and from the connections of others |lives. |

| | | | | |

|Read Aloud | | | | |

| | |Go over dismissal procedures. |Read Aloud |Read Aloud |

|Dismissal | | | | |

Interactive Read Aloud – Monitoring Comprehension/ Listening to Your Inner Voice

FOCUS: Monitoring Comprehension

Reading comprehension is an ongoing process of evolving thinking. When readers read and

construct meaning, they carry on an inner conversation with the text. They hear a voice in their head speaking to them as they read—a voice that questions, connects, laughs, cries. This inner conversation helps readers monitor their comprehension and keeps them engaged in the story, concept, information, and ideas, allowing them to build their understanding as they go.

FOCUS THE LEARNING

For this lesson, use a book the students are already familiar with. Tell students that you have noticed that sometimes when they are reading they get to parts they don’t understand but they don’t always stop if there is a tricky word they don’t understand or they can’t picture what’s going on, or a part is really confusing.

TEACHING POINT AND MODEL/DEMONSTRATION

Let me show you what I mean. I’m going to read along, but then I’m going to get to a confusing part.

Read a short passage; get to a part, stop, and model being confused. Explain that the next part of your job is to go back and fix the confusing part; I think I will reread and see if that helps me. I want you to be the kind of careful readers who catch yourselves when you’re reading and say, “Huh?” when something is confusing or unclear.

GUIDED PRACTICE/ACTIVE ENGAGEMENT

Prepare a part that has a tricky vocabulary word and read it aloud to the group.

Readers, we are going to do a little pretending here. I’m going to read this aloud and I want you to pretend that it’s you reading it. If it gets confusing, I want you to say, “Huh?’ Let’s try it. As I read, pretend you’re reading. I want you to be careful readers and listeners who notice if you get confused. I want to hear you say, “Huh?’ if it gets confusing,

Read the tricky part then ask the students to turn and tell their neighbors what part was confusing. Listen in.

Readers, I heard you say the word___ was really tricky and made you say, “Huh?” That happens when we read sometimes. There might be tricky words that we really need to think about. I heard some of you say that you couldn’t really picture what was going on in the last part, and it made you say, “Huh?” When you can’t picture something as you read, that can be a big clue that maybe you do not understand the words. Just as we have strategies we can use to figure out the words, I’ll teach you strategies you can use to help you figure out what’s going on in the story.

LINK TO ONGOING WORK

I want you to always be the kind of careful readers to notice the times you don’t understand something you’re reading so that you can fix it for yourselves. Anytime you’re reading, you might say, “Huh?” when you don’t understand. Today, when I meet with readers, I’ll be looking for people who catch themselves when they are having a hard time understanding something.

Interactive Read Aloud – Monitoring Comprehension/Using Fix-up Strategies

FOCUS: Monitoring Comprehension-Fix-Up Strategies

Reading comprehension is an ongoing process of evolving thinking. When readers read and

construct meaning, they carry on an inner conversation with the text. They hear a voice in their head speaking to them as they read—a voice that questions, connects, laughs, cries. This inner conversation helps readers monitor their comprehension and keeps them engaged in the story, concept, information, and ideas, allowing them to build their understanding as they go.

• Readers read back & read on to understand the tricky parts.

• Readers stop & make a picture in their minds to understand.

• Readers use clues from the book to better understand when a part is confusing.

FOCUS THE LEARNING

[For this lesson, use a book the students are already familiar with] Explain to students that you are going to teach them some of the things that careful readers do to figure out the tricky parts when they don’t quite understand what they are reading. Anchor chart of Fix-Up Strategies

TEACHING POINT AND MODEL/DEMONSTRATION

Teach specific strategies that help readers regain their comprehension when their texts get tricky or confusing. Let me show you what I mean. I’m going to read along until I get to a confusing part. Then I’m going to use a fix-up strategy to help me. Read a short passage; get to a part, stop, and model being confused. Explain that the next part of your job is to go back and fix the confusing part: I think I well…and see if that helps me.

Readers read back and read on to understand the tricky parts. Model how to read back a little and then read on to use the context in the story to help.

Readers stop & make a picture in their minds to understand. Model stopping to think and visualize a confusing part.

Readers use clues from the book to better understand when a part is confusing. Model using clues from the book (pictures, context clues, schema).

GUIDED PRACTICE/ACTIVE ENGAGEMENT

Give students opportunities to practice the strategies with you, by reading on, stopping to give students time to think when a part is confusing.

LINK TO ONGOING WORK

I want you to always be the kind of careful readers to notice the times you don’t understand something you’re reading so that you can fix it for yourselves. Anytime you’re reading, you might say, “Huh?” when you don’t understand. When I meet with readers, I’ll be looking for people who catch themselves when they are having a hard time understanding something.

Independent Reading – Selecting Books and Quiet Reading

FOCUS: Selecting Books and Quiet Reading

I can participate in independent reading.

I can find interesting things to read and I know how to put them back when I’m finished.

FOCUS THE LEARNING

In the next few weeks, you will get to read many wonderful books in our classroom and at home. We have had a chance to become familiar with some of the books from our classroom library. Today, I’d like to show you how we are going to keep our books in our library. Let’s talk about how we can choose, read, and return them in a way that lets us all find and use them easily

TEACHING POINT AND MODEL/DEMONSTRATION

Share the ways books are organized; point out books categorized by author, genre, topic, easier to harder, series, etc.

Show students how to take books out and return them to each basket.

We will all get to share these wonderful books in our classroom this summer. If we are responsible for selecting and returning them to the baskets, we will always be able to find the books we want to read.

GUIDED PRACTICE/ACTIVE ENGAGEMENT

Have small groups of students take turns choosing books (other students looking at books at their tables)

❖ What is the procedure for taking a book for independent reading? Will they be allowed to get a book any time or first thing in the mornings? You don’t want students spending their whole reading time looking for books. Make sure students are clear about when they can get a new book and where they will keep it. (book box, plastic bag, closet tray etc.)

Have them practice returning books to the right place. Have a few students model how to put the books back in the right place.

LINK TO ONGOING WORK

Write “Reading Is Thinking” on a chart. You can add to the chart over the next weeks as you teach strategies and students share how they think as they read.

Today you are going to have a good block of time to enjoy your reading. Reading is thinking and you can do your best thinking when it is quiet.

ASSESS THE LEARNING

Conference with students about their behavior. Share at the end of Reading Workshop about choosing and returning books. If students are not engaged, ask them what’s making it hard. You can have mini-lessons based on your observations. Here is something I have noticed…

Sample Chart

|Reading is Thinking |

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Independent Reading – How Readers Choose Books

FOCUS: How Readers Choose Books

I can make a good book choice.

FOCUS THE LEARNING

Each of you has chosen a book to read from our classroom library. Sometimes we just pick up a book and start to read then realize it isn’t a good book choice. We choose books to read for many reasons.

TEACHING POINT AND MODEL/DEMONSTRATION

Let me show you what I mean. Give example of how/why you choose books (love to read mysteries, favorite author, etc.) Bring in examples from your own reading life.

What do you think about when you choose a book?

Turn & Talk: Have students share their thinking with a partner-Listen in and share out with the whole group a few examples of students’ thinking

GUIDED PRACTICE/ACTIVE ENGAGEMENT

Write student responses on a chart. Today we have listed many of the different ways you might choose books to read. I’ll leave this list of ways readers choose books on the wall because you may think of other ways you choose books to read and we can add them. This will help you when you are picking your own books and you aren’t sure how to pick one.

Sample Chart

|Ways We Choose Books |

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|Look at the cover |

|Book recommendations from teachers or friends |

|Has characters we’ve read about in other books |

|Another book in a series |

|Great illustrations |

|Author we know and like |

|Heard it read aloud |

|Tried the beginning |

LINK TO ONGOING WORK

Now you can find a comfortable seat and enjoy your book. Remember, reading is thinking—so you will need to read silently. Do not talk, so that your classmates can do their best thinking. When we finish, we’ll quickly share how you chose the book you are now reading.

ASSESS THE LEARNING

Conference with students about their book choices. Make sure they can tell you why they chose their book. These conferences will give you information about what interests your students as well as help them understand how and why readers choose books. This will also help you recommend texts as well as supplement the classroom library with books of high student interest.

Word Study – Letter/Sound Relationships

Vowels With r

I can blend the vowel sound with r [car, her, fir, corn, hurt].

Materials: Chart paper, markers

|Vowels with r |

|ar |ir |or |

| | | |

|car |first |for |

|hard |shirt |torn |

|part |bird |born |

|art | | |

|farm | | |

|er |ur | |

| | | |

|her |fur | |

|mother |burn | |

|sister |turn | |

|person | | |

Activity 1 – Recognizing Words With Vowels And r

You may want to continue this lesson over two or more days.

1. Tell the children that you are going to be talking about vowels and the letter r in words. Write car on the chart.

2. Here is a word you know. What part of the word says /ar/?

3. Write ar at the top of the column and ask the children to generate some other examples of words they know that have ar.

4. Explain that sometimes it is hard to hear the difference in vowel sounds when they are right before r. Introduce the or column. Write the word for. Ask children to say both words and listen for the difference.

5. [er-ir-ur] Discuss the difference with children, but caution that you can’t always hear the difference when there is a vowel with r. Sometimes you have to think about how the word looks or connect it with other words.

6. Place ir at the top of the column and generate examples that have ir.

7. Continue to generate examples for each column, adding er and ur.

Word Study – Spelling Patterns

Learning the Silent e Pattern

I can understand that some words have a vowel, a consonant, and a silent e. The vowel sound is usually the name of the vowel.

Materials: Chart paper, magnetic letters

Repeat the lesson using a variety of patterns with silent e, such as –ake, ate, ide, ine, & oke.

Activity 2

1. Tell children you are going to show them a pattern they will see in many words.

2. Write can, cane; hop, hope; and kit, kite on the chart.

3. Ask the children what they notice about the letter patterns.

4. Now ask for more examples and add the pairs to the list—not, note; cub, cube; fin, fine; and hid, hide, for example.

5. Help the children generalize the principle from the examples, leading them to the understanding that with word patterns that consist of a consonant (or more that one consonant), a vowel, another consonant, and an e, the e is silent and the preceding vowel usually sounds like the name of the letter.

6. Give the students five words. Ask them to read them then add a silent e to each one, making ten paired real words. Then they can use each pair in the same sentence—for example, The cute little boy got a cut on his knee. Have students share out some examples before they start.

7. Add on to the list as students think of more word pairs.

Interactive Read Aloud – Writing-Ideas

|MENTOR TEXT: When I Was Young in the Mountains by Cynthia Rylant |

|Choose a text that is worthwhile, familiar, and available. Other texts that might be used for Ideas include A Tree Is Nice, Grandfather’s Journey, What Do You Do|

|With a Tail Like This? (a Gail Gibbons book) |

|FOCUS STRATEGY: Ideas |

|FOCUS THE LEARNING |

|Introduction: Our memories are special treasures that we can use as writers. When we write about our memories, it is a chance to savor them and enjoy them one |

|more time. The author of When I Was Young in the Mountains, Cynthia Rylant, lived with her grandparents in a cabin in the mountains of West Virginia until she |

|was eight. The house had no electricity or running water. This book is a wonderful celebration of her memories from those special years. |

|Turn & Talk; Think back to when you were little. Can you think of a memory that is special to you? Share your memories with your thinking partner. |

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|INTERACTIVE READ-ALOUD: MODEL AND GUIDED PRACTICE |

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Interactive Read Aloud – Writing-Ideas

When I was young, I remember my grandfather making popcorn. He

had this funny old popcorn popper that sat on top of the stove. He

would add oil and popcorn kernels and then put the lid on. Then

Grandpa would smile really big and ask who would like to help. Of

course, my brother and sister and I all wanted to be first.

The popcorn popper had a lid with a handle. When the pan started

to get hot, we could take turns standing on a stool by the stove and

we would turn the handle around and around while the popcorn

cooked. The pan was hot so we had to be careful, but oh how we

loved to be the one to turn that handle.

Standing on the stool, I felt almost as tall as Grandpa. I could see the

whole top of the stove and smell the oil as the pan got hotter and

hotter. We had to wear a big oven mitt on our hand so we didn’t get

burned, but that didn’t slow us down. Even with that big mitt, we

could grab the little handle and turn and turn and turn.

There was nothing better than the sound of the first kernels as they

started popping. Pop! Pop! Then pop-pop-pop-pop really fast!

What a wonderful memory!

© 2007 by Linda Hoyt from Interactive Read-Alouds, 2–3 (Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann). This page may be reproduced for classroom use only.

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Read The First Page. Isn’t this a good reminder? Our memories aren’t just about big things like trips and special events. The author is writing about Grandpa coming home from work with clean lips for a special kiss on her head. That is a small thing, but what a wonderful memory to use as a writer! I am going to start a list of things to remember when I am looking for ideas. I want to start with “focus on small things.”

Read To Where They Are In The Swimming Hole. This is another reminder about ideas for writing. Swimming is a great topic. Everyone likes to swim. I am going to add “swimming” and “fun things to do” on my list.

Turn & Talk: Do you have a special memory of going swimming? Share your thinking.

Read The Page Where They Are At Mr. And Mrs. Crawford’s Store. This is another good reminder about ideas for writing. The people in our lives! We all know people we can write about. We have our friends in class, our neighbors, our family members, and even the principal! Thinking about people we know is a great way to get ideas for writing. I am going to add that to our list.

Turn & Talk: If you were going to write about a person, who would you write about?

Continue To The End. Pause occasionally to help the children think about ideas for writing and to add suggestions to the list.

END OF STORY REFLECTION

I feel like I am just bursting with ideas for writing. I could write about special people in my life, about the fun of cooking and working on food with someone, about just sitting outside and listening to night noises…I could go on and on.

Turn & Talk: What ideas are you ready to write about after hearing this book? Share your thinking.

EXTEND THE LEARNING

• Have children keep a personal list of ideas for writing in their writing folder and add to it often.

• Bring in a photo album of your own and share a few photos and special memories. Then model a piece of writing about a memory while the children watch you write.

ASSESS THE LEARNING

• Confer with writers to see if they have strategies for selecting ideas for writing.

• Have children tell you about their writing before they begin so you can assess the clarity of their focus and the level of detail in their thinking.

• Gather small groups of students together and encourage them to share the ideas they have for writing. Assess their ability to gather ideas from personal experience and mentor texts.

Mini-Lesson

Day 2 – Handout 1

• Read the passage (“Popcorn” When I was young…) to the students, or invite them to read it with you chorally. Then have them reflect with a partner about the memory in the selection. Guide a conversation about generating writing from small ideas.

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