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9th Grade World History Curriculum MapKevin Jordan and Tommy FothergillFebruary 29, 2012HIS 399Title of Course9th Grade World HistoryLearners and LearningLearning Designers: Kevin Jordan and Tommy FothergillLearners:-This particular curriculum map is for a typical 9th grade World History high school classroom. The classroom is comprised primarily of two parent, high performing, upper-middle class Caucasian students. Due to recent Arizona legislation, there are a few IEP and SEI students in the individuals classes, and working with the special education teacher to address these needs while still teaching the content is challenging but manageable. These students will likely require more guidance when given assignments and will need tutoring to fully understand the content material. Overall, students are able to research historical events and formulate a well rounded thesis statement derived from both primary and secondary sources, with some help from the teacher. Aside from various IEP and SEI students, the overwhelming majority of students will need direction from the teacher for all assignments. However, for research papers and activities, students are given a much wider berth to explore topics of their choiceContent and SkillsGoals and Inquiry QuestionsIdentify 2-3 Enduring UnderstandingsStudents will be able to identify and analyze contributions of ancient civilizations (i.e., Greek, Roman, Mesopotamian, etc.) and the impact these contributions had upon future societiesStudents will be able to formulate a question based upon historical fact and develop a thesis statement for a research/argument paperIdentify 2-3 Essential/Initiating Questions that will drive your overall planHow have societies changed over time? How have they remained similar?How can an individual formulate and deliver an effective thesis stating a particular argument centered upon historical fact?StandardsArizona Standards-See Curriculum Mapii. NCSS Thematic Standards -See Curriculum Map Instructional Practice: PlanningSchool Calendar-See Curriculum MapRationale-Creating a curriculum map that addresses the necessary Arizona state standards, as well as the NCSS thematic standards was quite difficult. However, creating a lesson plan for United States’ students permitted Mr. Fothergill and I to delve more deeply into Eurocentric ideas and practices while still addressing these standards. We felt it necessary to exclude certain Asian units and globalization units in order to allow our students a better understanding of the dominant societies within the world today. Our curriculum map allowed students to explore various topics while still creating effective presentations, papers, research projects, etc.Instructional Practice – AssessmentAssessmentPre-Assessment-Throughout many of the year’s units, students will be asked about their prior knowledge of a subject either by way of discussion or by simple quizzes or homework assignmentFormative-Students will also engage in debates regarding various topics of the unit’s lessons, create research papers, and participate in class-wide discussions after being presented with necessary informationIntervention Strategies-Students will be permitted, on occasion, to revise certain shorter narratives and research papers and seek extra help if they do not fully comprehend the content materialSummative assessment methods-Throughout the year, students will take multiple quizzes, tests (including a midterm assessment and final exam), and give presentations and create narrativesInstructional Practice – Instructional Strategies and MethodsInstructional activity-During the Mesopotamia unit, a teacher-created game will be utilized that will allow students to gain a deeper understanding of relations within and between societies, how to formulate questions and theses based on historical fact, and allow them to assert their knowledge of relations and decision-making skills.Technology component-During the European expansion unit, Google Earth will be utilized to demonstrate to students which routes were taken by European explorers in order to help students conceptualize these routes. Furthermore, students will learn to use Google Earth and all of its features, and will give a presentation using Google Earth arguing why Europeans took the various paths that they did.BibliographyNational Council for the Social Studies, “National Curriculum Standards for Social Studies: Chapter 2—The Themes of Social Studies,” The National Council for the Social Studies, (accessed February 28, 2012).Arizona Department of Education, “Social Studies Strand Articulated by Grade Level Strand 2: World History,” Arizona Department of Education, (accessed February 28, 2012). ................
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