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Year 9Block2SoL Title: 20th and 21st Century Texts (English Language Paper 1, Section A)Aim (Provide a summary of skills to be developed): Develop students’ abilities in KCs 1,2,3,4,5,8. Identify and interpret explicit and implicit information and ideas and select and synthesise evidence from different texts; Explain, comment on and analyse how writers use language and structure to achieve effects and influence readers, using relevant subject terminology to support their views ; Evaluate texts critically and support this with appropriate textual references.Assessment objectives for this block (See LTP): AO1, AO2, AO4 (KCs 1,2,3,4,5,8)Assessment TaskAssessed on:NotesThe assessment for this block focuses on AQA GCSE English Language Paper 1 Section A. The assessment will involve all four Section A questions. Note: The actual assessment task will not be available to staff until planning week. AO1, AO2, AO4The assessment will take place in Week 5 of Term 2. There will be one planning lesson and the extract/questions will be released to staff one day before the assessment planning day. Students will be given two lessons to complete the full assessment. WeekSuggested ActivitiesResourcesRequired OutcomesSuggested Homework ActivitiesCatch UpCoreChallengeWeek 1 Lesson 1One lesson per fortnight is an AR-devoted lesson.One lesson per fortnight is an AR-devoted lesson.One lesson per fortnight is an AR-devoted lesson.One homework must be a 1 hour reading homework each week. Use AR diagnostic reading practice data to measure this (e.g. how many quizzes have students been taking over a 2 week period?) This homework must be logged on SMHW.One piece of substantial homework must be set for each class at least once a week.Week 1 Lesson 2Starter: Students read the extract from Lesson 1 PP and answer the ‘Challenge’ question.Students read the chapter up to ‘insouciant’ and then draw the character’s details on the template. Students focus on the paragraph beginning “The boy in the red jacket…” and highlight all the words that tell us something is not right about the character.Students write bullet points predicting what they think will happen next.Students read the rest of the chapter and give the chapter a score out of 10, explaining their decision. Plenary: Freeze Frame ActivityStarter: Students read the extract from Lesson 1 PP and answer the ‘Extra Challenge’ question.Students read the chapter up to ‘insouciant’ and then draw the character’s details, using textual evidence to support their ideas. Students focus on the paragraph beginning “The boy in the red jacket…” and explain how we know we can’t trust this character, using quotes to support their answers.Students explain what they think will happen next and why.Students explain which half of the chapter is stronger and why. Plenary: Freeze Frame ActivityStarter: Students read the extract from Lesson 1 PP and answer the ‘Mega Challenge’ question. Students read the chapter up to ‘insouciant’ and evaluate the writer’s use of language techniques to engage the reader. Students focus on the paragraph beginning “The boy in the red jacket…” and evaluate how the writer uses specific language techniques to show to the reader that we should not trust this character.Students place themselves in the position of the writer and judge how they would write the rest of the chapter and why. Students evaluate how the writer has built up the chapter and developed character through it. Plenary: Freeze Frame ActivitySee Lesson 1 for all activities. See Extracts folder for City of Bones chapter.To describe the way the writer opens and develops the chapterTo explain how the writer builds up an impression of the boy in the chapterTo evaluate the effectiveness of the structure in the first chapter of a novelOne homework must be a 1 hour reading homework each week. Use AR diagnostic reading practice data to measure this (e.g. how many quizzes have students been taking over a 2 week period?) This homework must be logged on SMHW.One piece of substantial homework must be set for each class at least once a week.Week 1 Lesson 3Students read the extract from Patrick Ness’ The Knife Of Letting Go’. Students draw a table and pick examples of how the writer mixes ordinary and extraordinary ideas together. Students analyse the paragraph beginning “We're walking across the wild fields south-east of town”, adding in where they think the full stops and capital letters should go. Students use one word to describe the narrator and create a mind map around this idea, adding in quotes from the text. Students use the scaffold to create a PETAZL paragraph.Students self-assess their work and provide themselves with WWW, EBI and Now.Students read the extract from Patrick Ness’ The Knife Of Letting Go’ and find three different narrative hooks the writer has used and explain for each one how it hooks us in. Students analyse the paragraph beginning “We're walking across the wild fields south-east of town”, judging how fast they think it should be read on a scale between 1-10. Students explain their interpretation. Students create a mind map that focuses in on how the boy is shown as a ‘typical teenager’, supporting their ideas with quotes. Students use the scaffold to create a PETAZL paragraph and include at least two quotes and a language technique. Students self-assess their work and provide themselves with WWW, EBI and Now.Students evaluate how the writer establishes tone through the use of language techniques – referring to specific examples. Students analyse the paragraph beginning “We're walking across the wild fields south-east of town”, evaluating the writer’s use of punctuation and pace within this paragraph. Students write an analytical paragraph (PETAZL) that evaluates how the writer presents a typical teenager in an untypical world. Students use the scaffold to create a PETAZL paragraph and include three quotes and several language techniques from across the chapter. Students self-assess their work and provide themselves with WWW, EBI and Now.See Lesson 2 for all activities. See ‘Extracts’ folder for extract. To describe the way the writer creates character in the opening chapter of a novelTo explain how the writer builds up an impression of the main character in the novelTo evaluate how the writer creates register and tone in the novelOne homework must be a 1 hour reading homework each week. Use AR diagnostic reading practice data to measure this (e.g. how many quizzes have students been taking over a 2 week period?) This homework must be logged on SMHW.One piece of substantial homework must be set for each class at least once a week.Week 1 Lesson 4Students study the Caravaggio painting and answer the Challenge. Students study the short paragraph from the extract and answer the Challenge – creating a storyboard. Students to develop their own success criteria for creating drama within a piece of writing and apply these to a dramatic roleplay piece, ensuring everyone in the group is involved.Students to write a list of instructions about creating drama within a text.Students study the Caravaggio painting and answer the Extra Challenge.Students study the short paragraph from the extract and answer the Extra Challenge – picking out the five most dramatic words and explaining their choices. Students to develop their own success criteria for creating drama within a piece of writing and apply these to a dramatic roleplay piece, adding a narrator and considering thoughts and feelings of characters within their piece.Students explain the best ways of making an opening particular dramatic.Students study the Caravaggio painting and answer the Mega Challenge.Students rewrite the extract in first person and evaluate how this changes the impact on the reader in terms of drama and tension. Students to develop their own success criteria for creating drama within a piece of writing and apply these to a dramatic roleplay piece, adding an additional character and meeting success criteria this way. Students provide options to a writer for creating a sense of drama that is effective. See Lesson 3 for all activities. See ‘Extracts’ folder for extract.To describe the ways a writer makes the opening to a novel dramaticTo explain how the writer uses language to make an opening dramaticTo evaluate how the writer creates an effective sense of drama for his readersOne homework must be a 1 hour reading homework each week. Use AR diagnostic reading practice data to measure this (e.g. how many quizzes have students been taking over a 2 week period?) This homework must be logged on SMHW.One piece of substantial homework must be set for each class at least once a week.Week 1 Lesson 5Students write down a list of words to describe the person in the photo. Students read another section from ‘The Da Vinci Code’ and explain what they think of the new character, adding quotes to their answer. Students read the rest of the extract and then create a bar chart explaining how the tension changes throughout the extract.Students describe what would happen in the next chapter.Students make ‘true or false’ statements about what we have learnt from today’s lesson, with other students providing answers. Students write down a description of the person within the photo using a variety of language techniques. Students read another section from ‘The Da Vinci Code’ and draw what they think the new character looks like, adding quotes to their drawing. Students read the rest of the extract and then create a bar chart, explaning which parts of the chapter are most tense and why. Students are asked: Would you make the next chapter as tense? Why? Why not? Students make ‘true or false’ statements about what we have learnt from today’s lesson, with other students providing answers.Students write a description of the person but provide a specific tone and evaluate how they did this. Students read another section from ‘The Da Vinci Code’ and evaluate how the new character is presented differently to the curator and WHY the writer has presented this character differently. Students read the rest of the extract and evaluate how the writer creates so much tension within the chapter. Students are asked: Sometimes juxtaposition (placing two very different concepts next to each other) can help to engage a reader. Why might having a very relaxed feel in chapter two be a good way to move the novel forward? Refer to specific techniques and examples. Students make ‘true or false’ statements about what we have learnt from today’s lesson, with other students providing answers.See Lesson 4 for all activities. See ‘Extracts’ folder for extract.To describe how the writer builds tension within a chapterTo explain how the writer engages the reader through tension in the chapterTo evaluate how the writer employs language to create tension for the readerOne homework must be a 1 hour reading homework each week. Use AR diagnostic reading practice data to measure this (e.g. how many quizzes have students been taking over a 2 week period?) This homework must be logged on SMHW.One piece of substantial homework must be set for each class at least once a week.Week 2 Lesson 1Students look at the opening sentence to the chapter and explain whether they think it is a good opening sentence or not and why. Challenge: What technique can you see being used in this quote? Why do you think the writer used it?Students read the next section of the chapter and answer: Challenge: What is your first impression of the character? Why? Students look at a further section of the extract. Challenge: Which part of this quote is so creepy? Why? A budding writer wants to write an incredibly creepy, uneasy and creepy novel, but they don’t know how.Using your learning today, provide them with advice. Students look at the opening sentence to the chapter and write out the next paragraph of the story, explaining the decision they made. Extra Challenge: What is the second part of the sentence so powerful?Students read the next section of the chapter and answer: Extra Challenge: Which words in this extract suggest this man is sinister or evil?Students look at a further section of the extract. Extra Challenge: What language techniques does the writer use to make this sound so creepy? Provide examples. A budding writer wants to write an incredibly creepy, uneasy and creepy novel, but they don’t know how.Using your learning today, provide them with advice. Students look at the opening sentence to the chapter and evaluate which words best help to build a particular tone, how the sentence structure assists this process and why.Mega Challenge: Why has the writer focussed on the knife at the start of the chapter rather than the main character? Students read the next section of the chapter and answer: Mega Challenge: It can be argued that the writer has written this to help us get inside the mind of the character. Do you agree with this? Add quotes/techniques to support your interpretation.Students look at a further section of the extract. Mega Challenge: How do the sentence structures here help to emphasise the creepiness to the reader? Provide detailed examples. A budding writer wants to write an incredibly creepy, uneasy and creepy novel, but they don’t know how.Using your learning today, provide them with advice. See Lesson 5 for all activities. See ‘Extracts’ folder for extract.One homework must be a 1 hour reading homework each week. Use AR diagnostic reading practice data to measure this (e.g. how many quizzes have students been taking over a 2 week period?) This homework must be logged on SMHW.One piece of substantial homework must be set for each class at least once a week.Week2 Lesson 2Students read the rest of the extract and then write what they think is the most terrifying sentence on a strip of paper. In their book, students write down the reasons for their decision. Sentence Swap Shop: Students move around the room explaining to students why their sentence is the most terrifying. They can swap sentences if they wish. Challenge: Explain to other members of the class why you sentence is the most terrifying.Students study a specific part of the text and begin to prepare to answer a Paper 1 Question 2-style question. Challenge: Highlight the sentences that help us to understand the main character.Students use the sentence starters on the board to write out an answer to Q2. Students self-assess their answers based on the success criteria and make improvements.Plenary: Success – Students explain how they have been successful today based around the learning outcomes. Students read the rest of the extract and then write what they think is the most terrifying sentence on a strip of paper. In their book, students write down the reasons for their decision and refer to specific language techniques in their answer. Sentence Swap Shop: Students move around the room explaining to students why their sentence is the most terrifying. They can swap sentences if they wish. Extra Challenge: Refer to language techniques within your explanations (e.g. similes or metaphors).Students study a specific part of the text and begin to prepare to answer a Paper 1 Question 2-style question. Extra Challenge: Label the language techniques the writer uses and explain how they help us to build an understanding of the main character.Students use the sentence starters on the board to write out an answer to Q2. Students self-assess their answers based on the success criteria and make improvements.Plenary: Success – Students explain how they have been successful today based around the learning outcomes. Students read the rest of the extract and then write what they think is the most terrifying sentence on a strip of paper. In their book, students evaluate how this sentence works with others to build such a clear sense of terror. Sentence Swap Shop: Students move around the room explaining to students why their sentence is the most terrifying. They can swap sentences if they wish. Mega Challenge: Evaluate why your sentence is the most terrifying compared to the others you are analysing.Students study a specific part of the text and begin to prepare to answer a Paper 1 Question 2-style question. Mega Challenge: Focus on the sentence construction and how this helps the writer to communicate ideas about the main character to the reader.Students use the sentence starters on the board to write out an answer to Q2. More able students can aim to add in several quotes or techniques.Students self-assess their answers based on the success criteria and make improvements.Plenary: Success – Students explain how they have been successful today based around the learning outcomes. See Lesson 6 for all activities. See ‘Extracts’ folder for extract.To describe how sentences produce terror in the readerTo explain how the writer uses language to build a sense of characterTo evaluate how the writer employs sentence structures to create a detailed understanding of character.One homework must be a 1 hour reading homework each week. Use AR diagnostic reading practice data to measure this (e.g. how many quizzes have students been taking over a 2 week period?) This homework must be logged on SMHW.One piece of substantial homework must be set for each class at least once a week.Week2 Lesson 3Students analyse the first sentence from the first chapter of 1984. What does this focus the reader’s attention on?Students analyse the last sentence from the extract. Do you understand what it means? If not, why would the writer want you to feel this way at the end of the chapter?Students focus on another section from the extract. Read the paragraph to the right. Highlight all the words which make us think something is strange about this world.Students create a ‘story shape’ graph using details from the extract. As we read, write down the focus of each paragraph (e.g. Winston’s flat or outside). Students write out their answer to a Q3-style question using the sentence starters to support them. Plenary: Students write a summary of their learning based around the LOs.Students analyse the first sentence from the first chapter of 1984. Why does the writer want to focus the reader’s attention on this?Students analyse the last sentence from the extract. Why does the writer want to focus the reader’s attention on this at the end?Students focus on another section from the extract. What do we learn about the character Winston from this extract? How do you feel about him? Students create a ‘story shape’ graph using details from the extract. Plot different points throughout the chapter and explain why it changes, e.g. It describes Winston’s appearance.Students write out their answer to a Q3-style question using the sentence starters to support them. Plenary: Students write a summary of their learning based around the LOs.Students analyse the first sentence from the first chapter of 1984. Why is this an effective beginning to the novel? Use specific examples.Students analyse the last sentence from the extract. Why is this an effective ending to the chapter? Use specific examples and language technique analysis. Students focus on another section from the extract. Why do you think the writer focuses our attention on both Winston and the place he lives in at the same time? What impression does it help us to build? Refer to quotes in your answer.Students create a ‘story shape’ graph using details from the extract. What do you notice about the overall shape of the chapter? Why do you think the writer has done this?Students write out their answer to a Q3-style question using the sentence starters to support them. Plenary: Students write a summary of their learning based around the LOs.See Lesson 7 for all activities. See ‘Extracts’ folder for extract.To describe how the writer opens and closes the chapter.To explain the effects of this beginning and ending on the reader.To evaluate the changing focus of the chapter and its effects on the reader. One homework must be a 1 hour reading homework each week. Use AR diagnostic reading practice data to measure this (e.g. how many quizzes have students been taking over a 2 week period?) This homework must be logged on SMHW.One piece of substantial homework must be set for each class at least once a week.Week 2 Lesson 4Students choose a colour to describe the atmosphere of 1984 so far. Why did you choose that colour? I chose the colour … because…The classroom is divided into two sections: Agree and Disagree. Students are given several post-it notes to develop agree and disagree opinions on the statement: A student, having read this section of the text said: “The writer focuses more on the development of character than showing us the world Winston lives in.”Students use their notes to answer the Q4-style question and are supported with sentence starters.Students list five things they have learnt from the lesson. Students choose a colour to describe the atmosphere of 1984 so far. How does the colour you have chosen fit with the atmosphere the writer wants to build? The colour … fits in with the atmosphere the writer tries to build because…The classroom is divided into two sections: Agree and Disagree. Students are given several post-it notes to develop agree and disagree opinions on the statement: A student, having read this section of the text said: “The writer focuses more on the development of character than showing us the world Winston lives in.” Students add relevant quotes to their post-its. Students use their notes to answer the Q4-style question and are supported with sentence starters.Students list five things they have learnt from the lesson. Students choose a colour to describe the atmosphere of 1984 so far. How has the writer managed to help build such a strong sense of atmosphere in the chapter?The classroom is divided into two sections: Agree and Disagree. Students are given several post-it notes to develop agree and disagree opinions on the statement: A student, having read this section of the text said: “The writer focuses more on the development of character than showing us the world Winston lives in.”Students add relevant quotes and analyse language techniques within their post-its.Students use their notes to answer the Q4-style question and are supported with sentence starters.Students list five things they have learnt from the lesson. See Lesson 8 for all activities. See ‘Extracts’ folder for extract.To describe our opinions on the development of the chapterTo assess whether the writer focuses on character or setting in the second half of the chapter and why.To evaluate the effectiveness of our answers based on success criteria.One homework must be a 1 hour reading homework each week. Use AR diagnostic reading practice data to measure this (e.g. how many quizzes have students been taking over a 2 week period?) This homework must be logged on SMHW.One piece of substantial homework must be set for each class at least once a week.Week 2 Lesson 5Students are to imagine they are working for a Hollywood film studio on a monster movie. Challenge: Draw or write a description of your monster.Students watch a clip from ‘The Woman in Black’. Whilst watching, they should make notes on: How the filmmakers make us terrified and tense without actually showing us the monster or ghost that we’re waiting for. Feedback session.Students read the extract. Highlight all the parts of the text that help to make us feel tense or terrified.Do you like this ending to the chapter? Why? Why not?.Students choose a word to describe their learning from the lesson and explain it to the rest of the class.Students are to imagine they are working for a Hollywood film studio on a monster movie. Extra Challenge: What is the back story to this monster? Why does it exist? What is its purpose? Why is it so terrifying?Students watch a clip from ‘The Woman in Black’. Whilst watching, they should make notes on: The use of lighting, sound and pace to build up a sense of terror. Feedback session.Students read the extract and then highlight and label all the techniques used to make us feel tense or terrified.Why do you think the writer suddenly decided to change the tone at the end? Students choose a word to describe their learning from the lesson and explain it to the rest of the class.Students are to imagine they are working for a Hollywood film studio on a monster movie. Mega Challenge: You are a professional writer. How will you build a sense of terror when writing about your monster?Students watch a clip from ‘The Woman in Black’. Whilst watching, they should make notes on: How the filmmakers play with our expectations in order to build up terror. Feedback session.Students read the extract and evaluate how the techniques are used to help build up a sense of tension or terror. Refer to specific examples in your answer.Some people describe this as an ‘anti-climax’, or a disappointment compared to the rest of the chapter. What do you think and why? Refer to specific language techniques and quotes in your answer. Students choose a word to describe their learning from the lesson and explain it to the rest of the class.See Lesson 9 for all activities. See ‘Extracts’ folder for extract.To describe the ways a writer can be build tension and terrorTo explain how the writer of ‘A Monster Calls’ builds tension and terror in his opening chapter.To evaluate how the writer manipulates the writer with his ending to the chapter.One homework must be a 1 hour reading homework each week. Use AR diagnostic reading practice data to measure this (e.g. how many quizzes have students been taking over a 2 week period?) This homework must be logged on SMHW.One piece of substantial homework must be set for each class at least once a week.Week 3 Lesson 1One lesson per fortnight is an AR-devoted lesson.One lesson per fortnight is an AR-devoted lesson.One lesson per fortnight is an AR-devoted lesson.One homework must be a 1 hour reading homework each week. Use AR diagnostic reading practice data to measure this (e.g. how many quizzes have students been taking over a 2 week period?) This homework must be logged on SMHW.One piece of substantial homework must be set for each class at least once a week.Week 3 Lesson 2Students consider the importance of lightning as a symbol. What can it represent?Students are given a lightning silhouette. Around your lightning drawing, write all the words to describe how the narrator feels.Students watch the science video about lightning. Using your learning from the video, write a couple of sentences describing what it’s like to be struck by lightning.Students read the extract. Go through and highlight all the most powerful images in the text.Students think about why the writer includes a list of events within the opening chapter. Think, pair, share.Just a minute plenary activity: Students try to talk for a minute on what they have learnt without stopping or stuttering. If they can’t, another student takes over. Students consider the importance of lightning as a symbol. Why do writers choose to use it?Students are given a lightning silhouette. Transform your lightning picture into a symbol that represents the narrator.Students watch the science video about lightning. What techniques did you use in your sentences? Why?Students read the extract. Label the techniques the writer uses to get across the experience of being struck by lightning.Students think about why the writer includes a list of events within the opening chapter. Think, pair, share.Just a minute plenary activity: Students try to talk for a minute on what they have learnt without stopping or stuttering. If they can’t, another student takes over.Students consider the importance of lightning as a symbol. How could lightning be used as a metaphor for life?Students are given a lightning silhouette. What technique is the writer using at the start of her chapter? How does it engage the audience? Students watch the science video about lightning. This is an experience very few people ever go through. Which techniques would be best to describe the experience? Why? Provide examples.Students read the extract. Why does the writer use this experience to open her novel? Refer to specific quotes and techniques.Students think about why the writer includes a list of events within the opening chapter. Think, pair, share.Just a minute plenary activity: Students try to talk for a minute on what they have learnt without stopping or stuttering. If they can’t, another student takes over.See Lesson 10 for all activities. See ‘Extracts’ folder for extract.To describe how a writer uses lightning as a symbolTo explain how the writer uses language to describe the experience of being struck by lightningTo evaluate the importance of lightning within this chapterOne homework must be a 1 hour reading homework each week. Use AR diagnostic reading practice data to measure this (e.g. how many quizzes have students been taking over a 2 week period?) This homework must be logged on SMHW.One piece of substantial homework must be set for each class at least once a week.Week 3 Lesson 3Students are given some background information on the extract. Why do you think the title of the chapter is ‘Different from all the rocks on the beach’?Draw a flow diagram for the extract, choosing one image or idea from each paragraph.Students are given a series of shapes. Which of these shapes best describes the structure of the extract? Why?Students use the sentence starters on the board to write a Q3-style answer.Plenary: Brain Gain. Students write down or draw everything they’ve learnt onto their brain diagram.Students are given some background information on the extract. At which point does the writer focus on fossils in the extract? Why might that be?Why do you think the writer ordered the first chapter in this way?Students are given a series of shapes. Why might the writer have chosen to start and end the same way?Students use the sentence starters on the board to write a Q3-style answer.Plenary: Brain Gain. Students write down or draw everything they’ve learnt onto their brain diagram.Students are given some background information on the extract. How does the writer combine the motifs of fossils and lightning? Why is this so effective?Rearrange the flow chart. How would it impact on the reader if the writer had chosen this order to write it in?Students are given a series of shapes. How does this particular structure impact on the reader?Students use the sentence starters on the board to write a Q3-style answer.Plenary: Brain Gain. Students write down or draw everything they’ve learnt onto their brain diagram.See Lesson 11 for all activities. See ‘Extracts’ folder for extract.To describe how the writer structures the extractTo explain the writers choice of foci throughout the chapterTo evaluate the writer’s effects on the reader through their choice of structureOne homework must be a 1 hour reading homework each week. Use AR diagnostic reading practice data to measure this (e.g. how many quizzes have students been taking over a 2 week period?) This homework must be logged on SMHW.One piece of substantial homework must be set for each class at least once a week.Week 3 Lesson 4You are granted three wishes only.What would you wish for?Students focus on the opening paragraph of the extract of The Monkey’s Paw. On your scraps of paper, choose the five most tense words in the extract. The wall goes on a scale from 1 (not tense at all) to 10 (maximum tension). Place your words on the wall scale.Students read through the rest of the extract. Go through and label all the techniques you can find. Students use the model PETAZL paragraph to write their own. Peer assessment activity. Students discuss with each other five things they have learnt from the lesson. You are granted three wishes only.Why would you wish for those things?Students focus on the opening paragraph of the extract of The Monkey’s Paw. On your scraps of paper, choose the three techniques used in the extract to produce tension. Place them on the wall scale (1-10).Students read through the rest of the extract. For each technique, explain how it helps the reader to feel a building sense of tension.Students use the model PETAZL paragraph to write their own. Peer assessment activity. Students discuss with each other five things they have learnt from the lesson. You are granted three wishes only.What do you think might be the dangers of making wishes? Students focus on the opening paragraph of the extract of The Monkey’s Paw. Find the opinions you agree with the most on the wall scale and on your scraps of paper evaluate why you agree so strongly. Students read through the rest of the extract. How does the writer employ the use of sound to impact on the reader? Refer to specific quotes and language techniques in your answer.Students use the model PETAZL paragraph to write their own, referring to multiple quotes and techniques. Peer assessment activity. Students discuss with each other five things they have learnt from the lesson. See Lesson 12 for all activities. See ‘Extracts’ folder for extract.To describe how the writer builds tension within an extractTo explain the writer uses language to build up tensionTo evaluate the effectiveness of our analyses using success criteriaOne homework must be a 1 hour reading homework each week. Use AR diagnostic reading practice data to measure this (e.g. how many quizzes have students been taking over a 2 week period?) This homework must be logged on SMHW.One piece of substantial homework must be set for each class at least once a week.Week 3 Lesson 5Students read the first five lines of the Rebecca extract. Students write down four facts about Manderley. Students mark their work according to the answers provided.Students focus on lines 5-16. Go through and annotate all the language techniques you can see being used.Students use the scaffold provided to write out a PETAZL on the use of language in the extract.Peer assessment activity.Plenary: Parrot talk game based around LOs.Students read the first five lines of the Rebecca extract. Students write down four facts about Manderley. Annotate the language techniques used in the first five lines.Students mark their work according to the answers provided.Students focus on lines 5-16. For each technique, choose an example and explain how it gets across the dream to the reader.Students use the scaffold provided to write out a PETAZL on the use of language in the extract. Extra Challenge: Refer to at least two quotes in your paragraph from the extract.Peer assessment activity.Plenary: Parrot talk game based around LOs.Students read the first five lines of the Rebecca extract. Students write down four facts about Manderley. Is this an effective beginning to the novel? Evaluate, referring to specific techniques and quotes. Students mark their work according to the answers provided.Students focus on lines 5-16. Evaluate how the writer uses language techniques to get across a vivid understanding of the dream to the reader.Students use the scaffold provided to write out a PETAZL on the use of language in the extract. Mega Challenge: Talk about at least two quotes and two techniques in your paragraph. Peer assessment activity.Plenary: Parrot talk game based around LOs.See Lesson 13 for all activities. See ‘Extracts’ folder for extract.To describe key facts from the extract and answer Q1 effectivelyTo explain how the writer describes the dream and how it impacts on the reader for Q2To evaluate the effectiveness of our Q2 analyses based on success criteriaOne homework must be a 1 hour reading homework each week. Use AR diagnostic reading practice data to measure this (e.g. how many quizzes have students been taking over a 2 week period?) This homework must be logged on SMHW.One piece of substantial homework must be set for each class at least once a week.Week 4 Lesson 1Read lines 5 to the end. (10 minutes)Show students part of the Minecraft video to give them an idea of what Manderley looks like. In one colour, highlight all the facts about the house.In another colour, highlight all the facts about the surrounding area. (15 minutes)When you have done this, complete your map of Manderley. (20 minutes) Core activity + Add quotes from the text to describe different parts of the map.Core activity + How is the house described differently to the surroundings? Why is this the case?See Lesson 14 for all activities. See ‘Extracts’ folder for extract.To describe how the writer gets across Manderley to the readerTo explain how the writer uses language to create an effect on the readerTo evaluate the effectiveness of our Q4 analyses based on success criteriaOne homework must be a 1 hour reading homework each week. Use AR diagnostic reading practice data to measure this (e.g. how many quizzes have students been taking over a 2 week period?) This homework must be logged on SMHW.One piece of substantial homework must be set for each class at least once a week.Week 4 Lesson 2What kind of atmosphere does the writer build up in this part of the text? (10 minutes)Students complete a table which provides both ‘for’ and ‘against’ arguments to answer Q4. (20 minutes)Students then spend the rest of lesson writing out their answer to the Q4-style question. Plenary: Progress Score activity.How is the setting described? Why do you think that is? (10 minutes)Students complete a table which provides both ‘for’ and ‘against’ arguments to answer Q4. (20 minutes)Students then spend the rest of lesson writing out their answer to the Q4-style question.Plenary: Progress Score activity.How does the speaker feel about Manderley? Why? What evidence do you have? (10 minutes) Students complete a table which provides both ‘for’ and ‘against’ arguments to answer Q4. (20 minutes)Students then spend the rest of lesson writing out their answer to the Q4-style question.Plenary: Progress Score activity.To describe how the writer gets across Manderley to the readerTo explain how the writer uses language to create an effect on the readerTo evaluate the effectiveness of our Q4 analyses based on success criteriaOne homework must be a 1 hour reading homework each week. Use AR diagnostic reading practice data to measure this (e.g. how many quizzes have students been taking over a 2 week period?) This homework must be logged on SMHW.One piece of substantial homework must be set for each class at least once a week.Week 4 Lesson 3Students are given an example Q4 answer to the question they answered in the previous lesson. Students highlight: quotes, techniques, how they answered the question. Students use their learning from the first activity to reflect on their answer, make improvements and make additions. Number each of the paragraphs (1 – 7). Cut out the paragraphs from your copy of the extract.Rearrange them in a different order. Which is the best paragraph to start with why?Students answer a Q3-style question using the sentence starters to support them. Plenary: PictionaryStudents are given an example Q4 answer to the question they answered in the previous lesson. Explain why you think this is a good answer.Students use their learning from the first activity to reflect on their answer, make improvements and make additions.Number each of the paragraphs (1 – 7). Cut out the paragraphs from your copy of the extract.Look at the order you’ve chosen – it can be the same as original. Why do you think this order works the best?Students answer a Q3-style question using the sentence starters to support them. Plenary: PictionaryStudents are given an example Q4 answer to the question they answered in the previous lesson. What do you notice about how the writer uses quotes, techniques and connectives? Why might these areas give it a top mark? Students use their learning from the first activity to reflect on their answer, make improvements and make additions.Number each of the paragraphs (1 – 7). Cut out the paragraphs from your copy of the extract.What has the writer done in terms of focus throughout the chapter in order to engage us as readers?Students answer a Q3-style question using the sentence starters to support them. Plenary: PictionarySee Lesson 15 for all activities. See ‘Extracts’ folder for extract.To describe the strengths of an example Q4 answerTo evaluate the effectiveness of our Q4 answers and make improvementsTo judge the impact of the structure of the extract on the readerOne homework must be a 1 hour reading homework each week. Use AR diagnostic reading practice data to measure this (e.g. how many quizzes have students been taking over a 2 week period?) This homework must be logged on SMHW.One piece of substantial homework must be set for each class at least once a week.Week 4 Lesson 4Read through the extract from the opening of the short story ‘Grace’. Challenge: Highlight all the words that show something awful or violent has happened.Students work with the teacher to annotate the extract on the board (feedback).Around the room are posters with information on the language techniques that are included in the extract.Move around the room and use the posters to annotate and label the techniques that are included in the extract.Students write a PETAZL using the model provided.Peer assessment activity.Plenary: Hot Seat activity.Read through the extract from the opening of the short story ‘Grace’. Extra Challenge: Highlight all the words that create a sense of mystery. How does the writer do this? Explain your ideas.Students work with the teacher to annotate the extract on the board (feedback).Extra Challenge: For each example you annotate, explain how it makes the reader feels.Students write a PETAZL using the model provided.Peer assessment activity.Plenary: Hot Seat activity.Read through the extract from the opening of the short story ‘Grace’. Mega Challenge: How does the writer make you feel interested and intrigued at the very start of this story? What techniques does he use? Why? Students work with the teacher to annotate the extract on the board (feedback).Mega Challenge: What kind of tone does the writer establish in this opening part of the text? How do the language techniques help to establish this tone? Students write a PETAZL using the model provided.Peer assessment activity.Plenary: Hot Seat activity.See Lesson 16 for all activities. See ‘Extracts’ folder for extracts. To describe how the writer engages the reader in the opening of ‘Grace’To explain how the writer uses language techniques to engage the reader.To evaluate the effectiveness of our PETAZL paragraphs based on success criteria.One homework must be a 1 hour reading homework each week. Use AR diagnostic reading practice data to measure this (e.g. how many quizzes have students been taking over a 2 week period?) This homework must be logged on SMHW.One piece of substantial homework must be set for each class at least once a week.Week 4 Lesson 5Students complete a final Paper 1 Section A run through. Choose a suitable extract and support students to answer Q1-4 style questions on the extract.Provide sentence scaffolds, model paragraphs, example answers, etc.Students complete a final Paper 1 Section A run through. Choose a suitable extract and support students to answer Q1-4 style questions on the extract.Provide sentence scaffolds, model paragraphs, example answers, etc.Students complete a final Paper 1 Section A run through. Choose a suitable extract and support students to answer Q1-4 style questions on the extract.Provide sentence scaffolds, model paragraphs, example answers, etc. Try to provide models/examples that show potential grade 8-9 answers.One homework must be a 1 hour reading homework each week. Use AR diagnostic reading practice data to measure this (e.g. how many quizzes have students been taking over a 2 week period?) This homework must be logged on SMHW.One piece of substantial homework must be set for each class at least once a week.Week 5 Lesson 1Assessment Planning/Preparation/Culmination (Provide details of planning/preparation activities): PlaOne homework must be a 1 hour reading homework each week. Use AR diagnostic reading practice data to measure this (e.g. how many quizzes have students been taking over a 2 week period?) This homework must be logged on SMHW.One piece of substantial homework must be set for each class at least once a week.Week 5 Lesson 2Assessment LessonAssessment LessonAssessment LessonWeek 5 Lesson 3Assessment LessonAssessment LessonAssessment LessonWeek 5 Lesson 4One lesson per fortnight is an AR-devoted lesson.One lesson per fortnight is an AR-devoted lesson.One lesson per fortnight is an AR-devoted lesson.One homework must be a 1 hour reading homework each week. Use AR diagnostic reading practice data to measure this (e.g. how many quizzes have students been taking over a 2 week period?) This homework must be logged on SMHW.One piece of substantial homework must be set for each class at least once a week.Week 5 Lesson 5Assessment Review Lesson (To be issued once assessment questions are released).Assessment Review Lesson (To be issued once assessment questions are released).Assessment Review Lesson (To be issued once assessment questions are released).To be emailed to staff during assessment window. One homework must be a 1 hour reading homework each week. Use AR diagnostic reading practice data to measure this (e.g. how many quizzes have students been taking over a 2 week period?) This homework must be logged on SMHW.One piece of substantial homework must be set for each class at least once a week.Week 6 Lesson 1Students now have an opportunity to work on their descriptive and narrative writing skills and use their Language Paper 1 Section A work as a pathway into this. Use one of the extracts previously studied as an opportunity to develop their writing skills. Provide students with sentence starters, connectives, writing frames, etc to support their writing. Students now have an opportunity to work on their descriptive and narrative writing skills and use their Language Paper 1 Section A work as a pathway into this. Use one of the extracts previously studied as an opportunity to develop their writing skills. Provide students with sentence starters, connectives, writing frames, etc to support their writing.Students now have an opportunity to work on their descriptive and narrative writing skills and use their Language Paper 1 Section A work as a pathway into this. Use one of the extracts previously studied as an opportunity to develop their writing skills. Provide students with extensive new vocabulary to use, synonyms and opportunities to improve their technical accuracy. One homework must be a 1 hour reading homework each week. Use AR diagnostic reading practice data to measure this (e.g. how many quizzes have students been taking over a 2 week period?) This homework must be logged on SMHW.One piece of substantial homework must be set for each class at least once a week.Week 6 Lesson 2Based on your exercise book/formative assessment marking, produce writing lessons based on the needs of the class (e.g. a lesson devoted to semicolons and colons). Based on your exercise book/formative assessment marking, produce writing lessons based on the needs of the class (e.g. a lesson devoted to semicolons and colons).Based on your exercise book/formative assessment marking, produce writing lessons based on the needs of the class (e.g. a lesson devoted to semicolons and colons).One homework must be a 1 hour reading homework each week. Use AR diagnostic reading practice data to measure this (e.g. how many quizzes have students been taking over a 2 week period?) This homework must be logged on SMHW.One piece of substantial homework must be set for each class at least once a week.Week 6 Lesson 3Provide students with a visual or aural stimulus to generate ideas for a narrative piece of writing. One homework must be a 1 hour reading homework each week. Use AR diagnostic reading practice data to measure this (e.g. how many quizzes have students been taking over a 2 week period?) This homework must be logged on SMHW.One piece of substantial homework must be set for each class at least once a week.Week 6 Lesson 4Students to develop their opening and closing paragraphs for impact. There are then opportunities to peer assess their own paragraphs and write analytical paragraphs based on these to improve their reading skills. Students to develop their opening and closing paragraphs for impact. There are then opportunities to peer assess their own paragraphs and write analytical paragraphs based on these to improve their reading skills.Students to develop their opening and closing paragraphs for impact. There are then opportunities to peer assess their own paragraphs and write analytical paragraphs based on these to improve their reading skills.One homework must be a 1 hour reading homework each week. Use AR diagnostic reading practice data to measure this (e.g. how many quizzes have students been taking over a 2 week period?) This homework must be logged on SMHW.One piece of substantial homework must be set for each class at least once a week.Week 6 Lesson 5DIRT Time opportunity. Students have an opportunity to reflect on their marked assessments based on the assessment grids and to make improvements. DIRT Time opportunity.. Students have an opportunity to reflect on their marked assessments based on the assessment grids and to make improvements.DIRT Time opportunity. Students have an opportunity to reflect on their marked assessments based on the assessment grids and to make improvements.One homework must be a 1 hour reading homework each week. Use AR diagnostic reading practice data to measure this (e.g. how many quizzes have students been taking over a 2 week period?) This homework must be logged on SMHW.One piece of substantial homework must be set for each class at least once a week. ................
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