WAYNE STATE UNIVERSITY

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WAYNE STATE UNIVERSITY

Professional Record

Faculty

NAME: Thomas M. Kelley, Ph.D. DATE PREPARED: March 1, 2017

Associate Professor

OFFICE ADDRESS: 3270 FAB HOME ADDRESS: 2510 Somerset Blvd.

Apt. 210

Troy, MI 4808

CELL PHONE: (248) 227-1757

CLINICAL OFFICE: (248) 227-1757

________________________________________________________________________

DEPARTMENT/COLLEGE: Criminal Justice, College of Liberal Arts

PRESENT RANK AND DATE OF RANK: Associate Professor, August, 1995

WSU APPOINTMENT HISTORY:

Year Appointed/Rank: Assistant Professor (1975)

Year Awarded Tenure: April, 1981

Year Promoted/Rank: Associate Professor (1995)

________________________________________________________________________

PLACE OF BIRTH: Detroit, MI.

CITIZEN OF: United States

________________________________________________________________________

EDUCATION:

High School: Mackenzie High School (1958-1961)

Senior Class President

President, National Honor Society

Baccalaureate: (1966) B.A. Wayne State University.

Psychology

Graduate: (1969) M.A. Wayne State University

(All course work for completed for Ph.D.)

Department of Psychology

College of Liberal Arts

(1972) Ph.D. Wayne State University

Educational Sociology

Post-Doctoral: Oakland University (Clinical Psychology)

Individual Intelligence Testing

Projective Testing

Clinical Interventions

Behavior Modification Techniques

Wayne State University

(Clinical Psychology Graduate Program)

Family Therapy Seminar

Psychotherapy Interventions with Children

Psychopathology of Childhood

Michigan Association for Psychoanalysis

Initiation of Psychotherapy

Henry Ford Hospital

Post-Doctoral Clinical Internship

(2000 hours)

Licensure: (1979) Licensed Psychologist

State of Michigan (#001119)

Department of Licensing and Regulation

Certification: (1975) Certified Social Worker

State of Michigan

Department of Licensing and Regulation

(1977) Academy of Certified Social Workers

National Association of Social Workers

(1998) Certified Health Realization Practitioner

Psychology of Mind Foundation

(1998) Diplomate, Forensic Clinical Psychology

American College of Forensic Examiners

Professional Society Memberships: Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences

American Psychological Association

American College of Forensic Examiners

I. TEACHING

A. Years at Wayne State: 41 years

B. Years at Other Colleges/Universities (Listed Below)

1975) University of Detroit

Adjunct Professor

Department of Criminal Justice

1976) Oakland University

Adjunct Professor

Department of Sociology

C. Courses Taught at Wayne State in the Last Five Years

1. Undergraduate: CRJ 3400-Juvenile Justice & Delinquency (9 times)

CRJ 1010-Introduction to Criminal Justice (1 time)

2. Graduate: CRJ 4310-Correctional Counseling Methods (5 times)

CRJ 5500-Child Abuse & Neglect (5 times)

D. Dissertation Committees

1. Dennis Sevard, Ph.D. Dissertation (2015-2016)

“The Effect of Gendered Spaces on the Gender Gap in Victimization:

Implications for Private and Public Security.” (Department of Sociology)

2. Bonnie Conde, Ed. D. Dissertation (2002-2004).

“Threat Assessment and School Security” (Educational Administration)

3. Robert Ankony, Ph.D. Dissertation (1994-1997).

“The Impact of Perceived Alienation on Proactive Law Enforcement for Police Officers.” (Department of Sociology)

4. Aaron Westrick, Ph.D. Dissertation (1993-1995).

“The Impact of Wearing Body Armor on Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

for Police Officers.” (Department of Sociology)

5. Douglas Joy, Ph.D. Dissertation (1980-1982). “Stress and Policing.” (Educational Sociology)

E. Masters Essays Directed (1996-2016)

1. Deborah Pearson, Masters Essay (1996).

“Court Delay and Modern Technology.”

2. Neal Rossow, Masters Essay (1997).

“Police Ethics: Philosophy, Reality, and Suggestions for the Future.”

3. (With Olga Tsoudis) Jaya Panicker, Masters Essay (1998).

“Shock Incarceration.”

4. Adrian Baranyk, Masters Essay (1998).

“Explaining Youth Violence Using Hirschi’s Theory of Social Control.”

5. Karen Lightheart, Masters Essay (1998).

“The Get Tough Approach: The Justice System’s Response to Juvenile Violence.”

6. Mildred Holmes, Masters Essay (1998).

“Understanding the History of Child Abuse and Neglect: Current

Status and Future Agenda.”

7. James Jones, Masters Thesis (1998).

“Law Enforcement and the Missing Children Problem.”

8. (With David Canales Portalatin) Jeffrey Buyle, Masters Essay (1998).

“Etiology and Recidivism of Child Molesters.”

9. Mary Lynn Wuthrich, Masters Essay (2000).

“Physical Ability Standards in Law Enforcement.”

10. Lisa Kerner, Masters Essay (2000).

“What’s Working: Characteristics of Effective Intervention Programs with

Chronic Juvenile Offenders.”

11. Sara Cavanaugh, Masters Essay (2001).

“Female Childhood Sexual Abuse: Causes, Effects, Treatment.”

12. Felicia White, Masters Essay (2001).

“The Effectiveness of Boot Camps as an Alternative to Incarceration.”

13. Brett Sojda, Masters Essay (2001).

“Western State Terrorism: A Critical View of Terrorism in the World.”

14. William Jones, III, Masters Essay (2003)

“Negotiating Terrorist Hostage Situations Post September 11th.”

15. Ron Powell, Masters Essay (2005).

“The Insanity Defense and the Mentally Ill.”

16. Rachel Stempian, Masters Essay (2005).

“History of the Punishment Movement in American Criminal Justice.

17. Charlotte Hale, Masters Essay (2005).

“A Comparison of Urban and Suburban Delinquency.”

18. Stacey Joseph, Masters Essay (2007).

“Waiver of Juvenile Offenders.”

19. Stephanie Drury, Masters Essay (2009).

“Probation: From rehabilitative tool to bureaucratic convenience.

20. Jake Oesch, Masters Essay (2011).

“Wilderness Therapy for At-Risk Youth: Past, Present, and Future”

21. Jan Shielke, Masters Essay (2011)

“Human Trafficking: An American Problem”

22. Heather Grabowski, Masters Essay (2012)

“Bullying”

(1975-1982) Directed approximately 40 CJ masters essays as a Political

Science assistant professor.

(1982-1995) Graded approximately 400 masters qualifying examination

questions.

Course or Curriculum Development

1. CRJ 450 – Prevention and Diversion in Juvenile Justice. Theories,

policies, and programs related to the prevention of youth crime and the

diversion of youthful offenders from the formal juvenile justice system.

2. CRJ 570 – Understanding and Coping with Stress in Criminal Justice. Using

a psycho-biological framework or model, students identify specific stressors

peculiar to criminal justice work and develop adaptive personal mechanisms

to mediate stress and alleviate the psychological effects of stress. Theories of

stress and relevant research at the level of individual, organization, and

society are emphasized.

3. CRJ 5430 – Counseling Methods with Youthful Offenders. To provide

students with an understanding of a variety of contemporary methods of

counseling, psychotherapy, and crisis intervention with youthful offenders.

The relationship of theory to counseling methods is emphasized.

4. CRJ 602 – Practicum in Justice System Counseling. Students are

acquainted with the principles and techniques of clinical interviewing

and counseling in supervised short term counseling relationships with

at-risk youth and their families.

5. CRJ 5500 –Child Abuse and Neglect. To provide students with an understanding of the extent, nature, theories, and current research of child abuse and neglect, the role of organizations, children’s welfare departments, juvenile courts, hospitals, physicians, and private citizens in dealing with this legal and social problem.

5. CRJ 600–Field Study Development. Developed and coordinated a program with the Wayne County Juvenile Court in Detroit, MI. in which criminal justice students work for field study credit as Companion Counselors with juveniles referred by the Court.

6. CRJ 600–Field Study Developed. Developed and coordinated a program with Henry Ford Hospital’s Counseling and Psychotherapy Center in Troy, MI. In this program, criminal justice students work for field study credit as Companion Counselors with “pre-delinquent” youth referred by the Center.

II. SCHOLARSHIP

Refereed Journal Articles & Comments

(Scimago Impact Factors; Total Google Scholar Citations = 749.

1. Kelley, T. M., Pransky, J., & Lambert E. (2016). Realizing improved mindfulness/flow/mental health through understanding three spiritual principles. Journal of Spirituality in Mental Health. DOI 10.1080/19349637.2016.1215855, 1-18. (Impact = 0.750; Citations = 0;

Contribution = 70%).

2. Kelley, T. M., & Pransky, J. (Forthcoming, 2017) A new principle-based view of intimate partner violence and its prevention. Partner Abuse: New Directions in Research, Interventions, and Policy. (New journal-Impact factor not determined; Contribution = 80%)

3. Kelley, T. M., Pransky, J., & Lambert, E. (2016) Understanding spiritual principles or depending on techniques to realize and sustain optimal mental health. Journal of Spirituality in Mental Health. DOI: 10.1080/19349637. 2015. 1087361 (Impact = 0.750; Citations = 2; Contribution = 70%)

4. Kelley, T. M., Pransky, J., & Lambert, E. (2015). Realizing improved mental health through understanding three spiritual principles. Spirituality in Clinical Practice, 2(4), 267-281. (New 2014 American Psychological Association sponsored journal-not yet ranked; Citations = 2; Contribution = 70%)

5. Lambert, E., Hogan, N., Griffin, M., & Kelley, T. M. (2015). The correctional staff burnout literature. Criminal Justice Studies, 4, 397-443. (Impact = 0.406; Citations = 2; Contribution = 20%)

6. Kelley, T. M., Pransky, J. & Lambert, E. A. (2015). Inside-out or outside-in: Understanding spiritual principles versus depending on techniques to realize improved mindfulness/mental health. Journal of Spirituality in Mental Health 17(3), 153-171. (Impact = 0.750; Citations = 2; Contribution = 70%).

7. Garland, B., Kim, B., Lambert, E., Hogan, N., & Kelley, T. M. (2014). The relationship of affective and continuance organizational commitment with correctional staff occupational burn-out: A partial replication and expansion study. Criminal Justice and Behavior, 41, 1161-1177. (Impact = 2.249; Citations = 11; Contribution = 20%)

8. Lambert, E., Kim, B., Hogan, N., Kelley, T. M., & Garland, B. (2014). Why I am here matters: The effects of continuance and affective commitment on organizational citizenship among prison staff. Security Journal, 1-16. (Impact = 1.058; Citations = 1; Contribution = 20%)

9. Lambert, E., Griffin, M., Hogan, N., & Kelley, T. M. (2014). The ties that bind: Organizational commitment and its effect on correctional orientation, absenteeism, and turnover intent. Prison Journal, 95(1), 135-156. (Impact = 1.136; Citations = 10; Contribution = 20%)

10. Kelley, T. M., Pransky, J., & Sedgeman, J. (2014). Realizing resilience in trauma exposed juvenile offenders: A promising new intervention for juvenile justice professionals. Journal of Child and Adolescent Trauma, 7, 143-151. (Impact = 0.989; Citations = 5; Contribution = 75%)

11. Pransky, J., & Kelley, T. M. (2014). Three principles for realizing mental health: A new psycho-spiritual view. Journal of Creativity in Mental Health, 9, 53-68. (Impact = 0.312; Citations = 5; Contribution = 70%)

12. Lambert, E., Hogan, N., Kelley, T. M., Kim, B., & Garland, B. (2014). When domains spill over: The relationship of affective and continuance commitment with work-family conflict among correctional staff. Criminal Justice Policy Review, 25(4), 476-502. (Impact = 0.856; Citations = 3; Contribution = 20%).

13. Pasciak, A., & Kelley, T. M. (2013). Conformity to traditional gender norms by male police officers exposed to trauma: Implications for critical incident stress debriefing. Applied Psychology in Criminal Justice, 9(2), 137-156. (Impact = 0.543; Citations = 6; Contribution = 80%)

14. Kelley, T. M., & Pransky, J. (2013). Principles for realizing resilience: A new view of trauma and human resilience. Journal of Traumatic Stress Disorders and Treatment, 2, 1, 10.4172/2324-8947.1000102

(New 2013 journal—not yet ranked; Citations = 11; Contribution = 80%)

15. Lambert, E., Kim, B., Kelley, T. M., & Hogan, N. L. (2013). The association of affective and continuance commitment with correctional staff life satisfaction. Social Science Journal, 50(2), 195-203. (Impact = 0.827; Citations = 12; Contribution = 20%;

16. Lambert, E., Kelley, T. M., & Hogan, N. (2013). Work-family conflict and organizational citizenship behaviors. Journal of Crime and Justice. 36(3), 398-417. (Impact = 1.068; Citations = 5; Contribution = 25%)

17. Garland, B., Hogan, N., Kelley, T. M., Kim, B., & Lambert, E. (2013). To be or not to be committed: The effects of continuance and affective commitment on absenteeism and turnover intent among private prison personnel. Journal of Applied Security Research, 8(1), 1-23.

(Impact = 0.347; Citations = 14; Contribution = 20%)

18. Lambert, E., Kelley, T. M., & Hogan, N. (2013). Hanging on too long: The relationship between different forms of organizational commitment and emotional exhaustion burnout among correctional staff. American Journal of Criminal Justice. 38(1), 51-66. (Impact = 1.135; Citations = 19; Contribution = 25%)

19. Lambert, E., Kelley, T. M., & Hogan, N. (2013). The association of occupational stressors with different forms of organizational commitment among correctional staff. American Journal of Criminal Justice. 38(3), 480-501. (Impact = 1.135; Citations = 3; Contribution = 25%)

20. Kelley, T. M., & Lambert, E. (2012). Mindfulness as a potential means of attenuating anger and aggression for prospective criminal justice professionals. Mindfulness. 3(4), 261-274. (Impact = 3.054; Citations = 15; Contribution = 75%)

21. Kelley, T. M. (2011). Thought recognition and psychological well-being: An empirical test of principle-based correctional counseling. Counseling and Psychotherapy Research. 11(2), 140-147. (Impact = 0.345; Citations = 11)

22. Kelley, T. M. (2008). Principle-based correctional counseling: Teaching health versus treating illness. Applied Psychology in Criminal Justice. 4 (2), 182-202. (Impact = 0.543; Citations = 9)

23. Kelley, T. M., & Robertson, R. (2008). Relational aggression and victimization in gay male relationships: The role of internalized homophobia. Aggressive Behavior. 34, 5, 475-485. (Impact = 2.698; Q1 Psychology; Citations = 18; Contribution = 80%)

24. Kelley, T. M., Mills, R. C., & Shuford, R. (2005). A principle-based psychology of school violence prevention. Journal of School Violence. 4, 2, 47-73. (Impact = 2.094; Citations = 19; Contribution = 80%)

25. Kelley, T. M. (2005). Mental health and prospective police professionals. Policing. 4, 1, 6-27. (Impact = 0.946; Citations = 45)

26. Kelley, Thomas M. (2005). Natural resilience and innate mental health. (Peer-refereed comment) American Psychologist. 60, 3, 265. (Impact = 4.114; Citations = 36)

27. Kelley, T. M. (2004). Reviewing criminal justice baccalaureate

curricula: The importance of student input. Journal of Criminal Justice Education. 15, 2, 219-237. (Impact = 0.786; Citations = 14)

28. Kelley, T. M. (2004). Positive psychology and adolescent mental

health: False promise or true breakthrough? Adolescence. 39, 154, 257-278. (Impact = 1.581; Citations = 62)

29. Kelley, T. M., Kennedy, D. B., & Homant, R. (2003).

Evaluation of an early intervention program for adolescent shoplifters.

Adolescence. 38, 152, 725-734. (Impact = 1.581; Citations = 14; Contribution = 90%)

30. Kelley, T. M. (2003). Preventing youth violence through Health Realization. Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice. 1, 4, 369-387.

(Impact = 2.146; Citations = 27)

31. Kelley, T. M. (2003). Health Realization: A Principle-based psychology of positive youth development. Child and Youth Care Forum. 1, 47-72. (Impact = 1.177; Citations = 45)

32. Stack, S. A., & Kelley, T. M. (2002). The Graduate Record

Examination as a predictor of graduate performance: The case for

criminal justice. Journal of Criminal Justice Education. 13, 335-349.

(Impact = 0.786; Citations = 22; Contribution = 50%)

33. Kelley, Thomas M. (2001). The need for a principle-based positive

psychology. (Peer-refereed comment) American Psychologist, 56, 1, 36-37. (Impact = 4.114; Citations = 12)

34. Kelley, T. M., & Stack, S. A. (2000). Thought recognition, locus of control, and adolescent well-being. Adolescence. 25, 139, 531-550. (Impact = 1.581; Citations = 50; Contribution = 75%)

35. Ankony, R. C., & Kelley, T. M. (1999). The impact of perceived alienation on police officers’ sense of mastery and motivation for proactive enforcement. Policing. 22, 2, 120-132. (Impact = 0.946; 15 Citations = 19; Contribution = 90%)

36. Kelley, T. M., & Stack, S. A. (1997). Achievement in criminal

justice; An analysis of graduating seniors. Journal of Criminal Justice Education. 8, (Spring): 39-50. (Impact = 0.786; Citations = 9; Contribution = 50%)

37. Kelley, T. M. (1996). At-risk youth and locus of control: Do they really see a choice? Juvenile and Family Court Journal. 47, 4, 39-54. (Impact = .409; Citations = 8)

38. Kelley, T. M. (1996). A critique of social bonding and control theory of delinquency using the principles of Psychology of Mind. Adolescence. 31, 122, 321-327. (Impact = 1.581; Citations = 23)

39. Stack, S. A., & Kelley, T. M. (1995). Police suicide: An analysis. American Journal of Police. 13, 4, 73-90. (Impact = 0.725; Citations = 26; Contribution = 40%)

40. Kelley, T. M. (1993). Neo-cognitive learning theory: Implications for prevention and early intervention strategies with at-risk youth. Adolescence. 28, 110, 439-460. (Impact = 1.581; Citations = 19)

41. Kelley, T. M. (1993). An advanced criminology based on Psychology of Mind. Offender Rehabilitation. 19, 173-190. (Impact = 0.957; Citations = 13)

42. Kelley, T. M. (1990). A neo-cognitive model of crime. Offender Rehabilitation. 16, 1-26. (Impact = 0.957; Citations = 13)

43. Homant, R. J., Kennedy, D. B., & Kelley, T. M. (1986). Ideology as a determinant of views on the insanity defense. Journal of Criminal Justice. 14, 37-46. (Impact = 3.57; Citations = 4; Contribution = 30%)

44. Homant, R. J., Kennedy, D. B., & Kelley, T. M. (1985). The insanity defense: A test of the “hired gun” hypothesis. Psychological Reports. 57, 117-118. (Impact = 0.764; Citations = 2; Contribution = 30%)

45. Kelley, T. M. (1983). Status offenders can be different: A test of the

propositions of labeling theory. Crime and Delinquency. 26, 365-380. (Impact = 1.858; Citations = 10)

46. Kelley, T. M., & Kennedy, D. B. (1982). Assessing and predicting the competency of juvenile court probation officers. Journal of Criminal Justice. (Impact = 3.57; Citations = 4; Contribution = 80%)

47. Kennedy, D. B., & Kelley, T. M. (1981). The swinging pendulum of correctional reform. Criminal Justice Review. 6, 44-47. (Impact = 0.948; Citations = 8; Contribution = 40%)

48. Kelley, T. M., & Kennedy, Daniel B. (1980). Some cautions for the future of criminal justice research. Police Chief, 37, 23-25.

49. Kiyak, A., Kelley, T. M., & Blak, R. A. (1979). Effects of familiarity on self-disclosure in a client-counselor relationship. Psychological Reports. 45, 719-727. (Impact = 0.764; Citations = 7; Contribution = 50%)

50. Kelley, T. M. (1979). Delinquency prevention and control: Past, present and future. LAE Journal of the American Criminal Justice Association. 42, 6-39. (Impact = 0.878; Citations = 8)

51. Kelley, T. M. (1978). Clinical assessment and the detention, disposition, and treatment of emotionally disturbed delinquent youth. Journal of Criminal Justice. 6, 315-327. (Impact = 3.57; Citations = 8)

52. Kelley, T. M., & Kennedy, D. B. (1977). Education/training of

criminal justice personnel: Some thoughts and reflections. Police Chief, 34, 60-63.

53. Kelley, T. M., Kiyak, A., & Blak, R. A. (1978). The

effectiveness of college student companion therapists with pre-delinquent

juveniles. Police Science and Administration. 7, 2, 186-195.

(Impact = 0.946; Citations = 7; Contribution = 50%)

54. Kelley, T. M., Kiyak, A., & Blak, R. A. (1978). Changes in self-esteem among pre-delinquent youth in voluntary counseling relationships. Juvenile and Family Court Journal. 60-63. (Impact = 0.409; Citations = 4; Contribution = 50%)

55. Kelley, T. M., Shulman, J., & Lynch, K. (1976). Decentralized intake and diversion: The juvenile court’s link to the youth service bureau. Juvenile and Family Court Journal. 3-11. (Impact = 0.409; Citations = 8; Contribution = 50%)

56. Kelley, T. M., & Kennedy, D. B. (1973). Validation of a selection device for volunteer probation officers. Journal of Criminal Justice. 5, 2, 211-212. (Impact = 3.57; Citations = 1; Contribution = 80%)

57. Kelley, T. M., & Kennedy, D. B. (1972). Delinquency prevention and college student professionals: A new approach for our juvenile courts. Volunteer Administration. 12, 3, 3-11. (Impact = 0.750; Citations = 2; Contribution = 90%)

58. Kelley, T. M. (1968). A study of comparative validities between Caucasian and Negro employees on an industrial selection battery. Psychological Reports, 30, 415-431.

B. Supported Research: Grant and Contract Proposals Submitted and Funded

1. Co-Principle Investigator (2016). Project title: Transforming Psychology and the Social Sciences. Funding source: Institute of Venture Science. Funding decision pending.

2. Principle Investigator (2016). Project title: Improving School Climate and Connectedness at Horizon Alternative School. Funding source: Cypress Imitative, Tampa Florida. Amount awarded = $80,000.

3. Co-Principle Investigator (2016). Title: “Beyond Recovery: Three Principles Intervention with Sex Offenders in an English Prison.” Funding Agency: North Hamaptonshire County Council, Public Health and Well-Being. Amount Awarded = £19,000.

4. Co-Principle Investigator (2015). Project title: Thriving vs. Surviving:

Part I of Coming Home to Peace Project. Funding source: Merancas Foundation, Charlotte, NC. Amount Requested = $16,991. (Funding decision pending).

5. Co-Principle Investigator (2015). Project title: Thriving vs. Surviving:

Part I of Coming Home to Peace Project. Funding source: Philip Van Every Foundation, Charlotte, NC. Amount requested = $16,991. Funding decision pending.

6. Co-Principle Investigator (2015). Project title: The Efficacy of Three Principles Intervention with Offenders in an English Prison.” Beyond Recovery. Funding source: Northamptonshire County Council, Public Health and Well-Being. Amount received = £87,113.

7. Co-Principle Investigator (2015). Project title: “The Spark Program.” Funding Agency: Cypress Initiative. Amount awarded = $83,000.

8. Co-Principle Investigator (2015). Project title: Principles of State of Mind, Resilience and Well-Being Initiative for Educators. Funding Agency: British Columbia Teacher’s Federation. Amount requested not specified at this time. Waiting for notification of interview with funding agency.

9. Co-Principle Investigator (2014). Project title: “Youth Justice Initiative.” Funding Agency: United Way of Central Iowa. Amount awarded = $75,000.

10. Principle Investigator (1972-1975). Title: Juvenile Court Administration Study. Funding agency: Law Enforcement Assistance Administration. Amount awarded = $500,000.

11. Principle Investigator Principle Investigator (1972-1975). Title: Juvenile Court Clinic Enhancement Project. Funding agency: Law Enforcement Assistance Administrating. Amount received = $260,000.

12. Principle Investigator (1972-1975). Title: Companion Counseling Program. Funding agency: Law Enforcement Assistance Administration. Amount received = $90,000.

13. Principle Investigator (1972-1975). Title: Youth Service Bureau Program. Funding agency: Law Enforcement Assistance Administration. Amount received = $1,200,000.

C. Chapters, Book Reviews, Encyclopedia Entries, and Comments

1. Kelley, T. M., & Kennedy, D. B. (1978). Current concerns in police education. Holbrook Press.

2. Kelley, T. M. (1993). Crime and Psychology of Mind: A neo-cognitive view of delinquency. In G. Barak (Ed.) Varieties of Criminology: Readings from a Dynamic Discipline. Praeger.

3. Kelley, T. M. (1994). “At Personal Risk” by Marilyn Peterson. (Review) Journal of Comparative Family Studies, 25, 422-424.

4. Kelley, T. M. (1995). Crisis intervention: The role of police, courts, and corrections. In William Chambliss (Ed.) Encyclopedia of Criminology. Macmillan.

5. Kelley, T. M. (1995). Treatment of delinquents: Unconventional. In D. Fogel (Ed.) Encyclopedia of Criminology. Macmillan.

6. Kelley, T. M. (2000). Learning and conditioning models of personality. In W. Edward Craighead and C. B. Nemeroff (Eds.) Encyclopedia of Psychology and Behavioral Science. Wiley.

7. Stack. S. A., & Kelley, T. M. (2000). Police suicide: An analysis.

In Dennis Kenny (Ed.) Police and Policing, Greenwich, CT.; Praeger

8. Kelley, T. M. (2010). The Mary Ellen Wilson case: Impact on child abuse prevention. In Janet Wilson (Ed.), Praeger Handbook of Victimology. Praeger.

9. Kelley, T. M. (2010). Judicial accommodations for child witness in cases of child sexual abuse. In Janet Wilson (Ed.), Praeger Handbook of Victimology. Praeger.

10. Kelley, T. M. (2011). Hereditary crime. In Wilber Miller and O. Geoffrey Golson (Eds.), Social History of Crime and Punishment. Sage.

11. Kelley, T. M. (2014). The motivational impairment effect. In Timothy Levine and Geoffrey Golson (Eds.), Encyclopedia of Lying and Deception. Sage.

12. Kelley, T. M. (2014). Paltering. In Timothy Levine and Geoffrey Golson (Eds.), Encyclopedia of Lying and Deception. Sage.

13. Kelley, T. M. (2014). Lying in adolescence. In Timothy Levine and Geoffrey Golson (Eds.), Encyclopedia of Lying and Deception. Sage.

14. Kelley, T. M. (2015). Jail and secure detention diversion programs for children and adolescents. In J. Geoffrey Golson (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Human Services and Diversity. Sage.

15. Kelley, T. M. (2015). Lying in adolescence. In Timothy Levine and Geoffrey Golson (Eds.), Encyclopedia of Lying and Deception. Sage.

16. Kelley, T. M. (2014). Happiness versus genuine mental health. (Comment) Psychotherapy Networker.

17. Kelley, T. M. (2015). Resolving trauma via thought recognition. (Comment) Psychotherapy Networker.

18. Kelley, T. M., Pransky, J, & Lambert, E. (2016). Realizing improved mental health through understanding three spiritual principles. Research Review: A Digest of New Scientific Research Concerning Religion, Brain, and Behavior. Joel Daniels (Ed.) Institute for the Bio-Cultural Study of Religion (IBCSR).

19. Kelley, T. M. (2017). The bewildering world of therapeutic aps. (Comment) Psychotherapy Networker.

D. Books

1. Seitzinger, J., & Kelley, T. M. (1974). Police terminology: A programmed

manual for criminal justice students. Springfield: Charles Thomas.

E. Psychological Inventories Constructed and Validated

1. Kelley, T. M. (1973) Critical Incident Response Test (CIRT).

2. Kelley, T. M. (2002). Well-Being Inventory (WBI).

3. Kelley, T. M., & Pransky, J. (2012). Innate Health/Clear Mind Questionnaire (IH/CMQ). (Contribution 50%)

4. Kelley, T. M., & Pransky, J. (2012). Thought Recognition Inventory (TRI). (Contribution 50%)

5. Kelley, T. M., Pransky, J., Sedgeman, J., & Ramos, L. (2015). Three Principles Inventory (3PI-Revised). (Contribution 50%)

F. Articles under Review and Revise and Re-submit

1. Sevard, D., & Kelley, T. M. “Routine activities, and criminal victimization: The impact of gendered spaces.” Under review at Journal of Interpersonal Violence. (Contribution 85%)

2. Kelley, T. M., Hollows, J., Savard, D., Lambert, E. G., & Pransky, J. (Under Review). Teaching health vs. treating illness: The efficacy of three principles correctional counseling with inmates in an English prison. Under review at Criminal Justice and Behavior.

3. Kelley, T. M., Alexander, J., & Pransky, J. “Building resilience in youth: The efficacy of a promising new intervention.” Under review at International Journal of Child, Youth and Family Studies (Contribution 80%)

4. Pransky, J., & Kelley, T. M. “Speculation of how the formless comes into form: A plausible quasi-scientific justification of the Three Principles.” Under review at Cogent Psychology (Contribution 80%)

5. Jiang, S., Lambert, E. G., Jianhong, L., & Zhang, J., & Kelley, T. M. (Revise & Resubmit). “Effects of work environment variables on Chinese prison staff’s organizational commitment.” Australian and New Zealand Journal of Criminology. Revise and resubmit submitted 10/23/16. (Contribution 15%)

E. Current Research

1. Kelley, T. M., Hollows, J., Savard, D., Lambert e., & Pransky, J. Teaching health vs. treating illness: The efficacy of three principles correctional counseling for inmates in an English prison.

2. Kelley, T. M. The efficacy of a Three Principles intervention with high-risk adolescents in Des Moines, Iowa. (A pre-post quasi-experimental study)

3. Kelley, T. M. Wheeldon-Reece, B., & Lakshmanarayan, R. The efficacy of a three principles intervention with at high-risk youth in Florida.

Conference Presentations

1. American Sociological Association Annual Meeting (2016). “Life Satisfaction of Chinese Correctional Staff” (with Jianhong Liu, Eric Lambert, Shanhe Jiang, and Jinwu Jhang).

2. Three Principles Global Community Annual Conference (2016). “The Efficacy of Three Principles Intervention” (with Jack Pransky and Jacqueline Hollows).

3. Center for Sustainable Change Tele-Summit (2015) (with Jack Pransky). Three Principles Research: Past, Present, Future.

4. Three Principles Global Community Conference (2014) (with Jack Pransky, Judith Sedgeman, Linda Ramus). The Three Principles Understanding Inventory: A Common Instrument for Evaluating the Efficacy of the Three Principles Intervention.

5. Three Principles Global Community Conference (2013) (with Jack Pransky, Judith Sedgeman & Linda Ramus). “Research: Validation of the Three Principles Inventory.”

6. Wayne State University Humanities Center’s Fall Symposium on “Truth.” Presentation on “Paltering.” (2014).

7. The Three Principles Global Community Conference (2013) (With Jack Pransky and Eric Lambert). “The Proposed Path from Understanding the Principles of Mind, Consciousness and Thought to Improved Mental Health: An Empirical Analysis.”

8. American Society of Criminology (2013). (With Eric Lambert, Nancy Hogen, Kevin Minor, James Wells, and Kelly Cheeseman). “How I Bond Matters: The Issue of Affective and Continuance Commitment among Correctional Staff.”

9. American Society of Criminology (2013). (With Eric Lambert, Shannon Barton-Bellessa, Brett Garland, and Bitna Kim). “The Correctional Staff Burnout Literature.”

10. Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences (2013). (With Eric Lambert, Nancy Hogen, Brett Garland, Marie Griffin, and Bitna Kim). “A Further Explanation of the Effects of Affective and Continuance Commitment with Job Burnout among Correctional Staff.”

11. Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences (2012) (With Irshad Altheimer, Nancy Hogan, and Eric Lambert). “Work-Family Conflict and Organizational Citizenship Behaviors: A Preliminary Examination.”

12. Midwestern Criminal Justice Association (2012) (With Eric Lambert and Nancy Hogan). “The Association of Occupational Stressors with Different Forms of Organizational Commitment among Correctional Staff.”

13. Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences (2011). (With Eric Lambert). “Mindfulness as a Potential Means of Attenuating Aggression of Prospective Criminal Justice Professionals.

14. Midwestern Criminal Justice Association (2012) (With Eric Lambert and Nancy Hogan). “The Association of Occupational Stressors with Different Forms of Organizational Commitment among Correctional Staff.”

15. Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences (2011). (With Eric Lambert). “Mindfulness as a Potential Means of Attenuating Aggression of Prospective Criminal Justice Professionals.”

16. Midwestern Criminal Justice Association (2011). (With Eric Lambert and Nancy Hogan). “Hanging On Too Long: The Relationship between Different Forms of Organizational Commitment and Emotional Burnout Among Correctional Staff.” (3rd Year).

17. Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences (2005). “Assessment of Criminal Justice Education.”

18. Psychology of Mind Annual Conference (2003). “Thought Recognition and Psychological Well-Being.”

19. Department of Youth Corrections – Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic (2003). “More Applications of the Health Realization Model to Youthful Offenders.”

20. Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences Annual Conference (2000).

“The Need for a Principle-Based Positive Psychology.”

21. Department of Youth Corrections – Santo Domingo, Dominican

Republic (January, 2000). “Applications of the Health Realization

Model to Juvenile Corrections.

22. Psychology of Mind, 13th Annual Conference (June, 1999). “Natural

Thinking and Effortless Living.”

23. Psychology of Mind 17th Annual Conference. (1998). “Locus of

Control, Thought Recognition, and Adolescent Happiness.”

24. Psychology of Mind 16th Annual Conference (1997). “Falling in Love

With Life: A Guide to Effortless Happiness and Peace of Mind.”

25. Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences Annual Conference (1996).

“The Relationship of At-Risk Level and Locus of Control for Juvenile

Shoplifters.”

26. Academy of Criminal Justice Science Annual Conference (1995). “A

Critique of Social Bonding and Control Theory Using the Principles of

Psychology of Mind.”

27. Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences Annual Conference (1994).

“An Analysis of Three Contemporary Theories of Delinquency Using

the Distinctions of Psychology of Mind.”

28. Psychology of Mind 13th Annual Conference (1994). “Using the

Principles of Psychology of Mind in the Treatment of Chronic

Delinquents.”

29. Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences Annual Conference (1993).

“The Impact of a Juvenile Court Diversion Program on Juvenile Retail

Fraud.”

30. Psychology of Mind 12th Annual Conference (1993). “Psychology of

Mind Applied to the Field of Criminology.”

31. Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences Annual Conference (1992).

“Neo-Cognitive Learning Theory: Implications for At-Risk Youth.”

32. Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences Annual Conference (1990).

“Breakthrough Criminology: A Neo-Cognitive Model of Crime.”

33. Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences Annual Conference (1982, with

Doug Joy). “Dysfunctional Attitudes and Police Stress.”

34. Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences Annual Conference (1980).

“Some Cautions for the Future of Criminal Justice research.”

Invited and/or Refereed Regionally and Locally

1. Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters (2001) (with Steve Stack). “The Graduate Record Exam as a Predictor of Graduate Performance in Criminal Justice.”

2. Midwestern Criminal Justice Association in Chicago, Illinois (2011) (with Eric Lambert and Nancy Hogan). “Hanging on Too Long: The Relationship Between Different Forms of Organizational Commitment and Emotional Burnout Among Correctional Staff.”

111. SERVICE

A. Committee Assignments (2011-2016)

1. College/Department Committee Membership

a. Criminal Justice Graduate Committee (2011-2015).

b. Criminal Justice Salary Committee (2011-2016).

c. Criminal Justice Promotion and Tenure Committee (2011-2014)

d. Personnel and Policy Committee (2013-2016).

e. Chair/Faculty Search Committees (2011-2015)

B. Service to the Profession

1. Peer reviewer for the following journals:

a. Juvenile Justice Journal

b. Juvenile and Family Court Journal

c. Child and Youth Care Forum

d. Adolescence

e. Policing

f. Offender Rehabilitation

g. Police and Criminal Psychology

h. Applied Psychology in Criminal Justice

i. Sage Open

j. Counseling and Psychotherapy Research

k. Child and Adolescent Mental Health

l. Stress and Health

m. Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice

C. Service to the Community

I have given numerous media presentations regarding delinquency, youth violence, youth gangs, school shootings, and child abuse and neglect. For one year, I hosted a weekly radio program (pro bono) in which I presented current research regarding mental health and interviewed prominent mental health experts. I have spoken at several local schools about youth violence and delinquency prevention. I have donated over two thousand hours of psychotherapy to indigent clients referred by Alcoholics Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous. I have provided over 200 hours of service to “Partnerships in Healing,” lecturing on mental health and psychological well-being. I have provided over 1,000 hours of service to the Center for Sustainable Change, designing research instruments and research methodology to evaluate the efficacy of the three principles intervention with at-risk youth, prison inmates, and returning Gulf War veterans diagnosed with PTSD. Finally, I have written two self-help psychology books as a service contribution for the lay public.

Project: Improving School Climate and Connectedness at Horizon Alternative School. Assisted the Cypress Initiative in Tampa, Florida in developing and implementing a research proposal which was funded for $80,000. (50 hours and on-going)

Co-Principle Investigator (2016). Project: “Beyond Recovery: Three Principles Intervention with Sex Offenders in an English Prison.” Assisted the Beyond Recovery in developing and implementing a research proposal which was funded for £19,000 by the North Hamaptonshire County Council. (100 hours and on-going)

Co-Principle Investigator (2015). Project: Thriving vs. Surviving: Part I of Coming Home to Peace Project. Assisted the Center for Sustainable Change in Tampa, in developing a research proposal submitted to the Merancas Foundation in Charlotte, NC. Amount Requested = $16,991. (Not funded) (50 hours)

Project: Thriving vs. Surviving: Part I of Coming Home to Peace Project. Assisted the Center for Sustainable Change in Tampa, FL in developing a research proposal submitted to the Philip Van Every Foundation, Charlotte, NC. Amount requested = $16,991. (Not funded) (30 hours)

Project: Beyond Recovery: The Efficacy of Three Principles Intervention with Sex Offenders in an English Prison.” Assisted the Beyond Recovery organization in developing and implementing a research proposal funded for £87,113 by the North Hamaptonshire County Council. (100 hours and on-going)

Co-Principle Investigator (2015). Project: The Spark Program. Assisted the Cypress Initiative in Tampa, Florida in developing and implementing a research proposal which was funded for $83,000. (50 hours and on-going)

Project: Principles of State of Mind, Resilience and Well-Being Initiative for Educators. Assisted in developing a research proposal submitted to the British Columbia Teacher’s Federation. (Not funded) (10 hours)

Co-Principle Investigator (2014). Project: Youth Justice Initiative. Assisted in developing and implementing a research proposal submitted to United Way of Central Iowa which was funded for $75,000.

D. Books Written for the Lay Public

1. Kelley, Thomas M. (1997 & 2004). Falling in love with life: A guide to effortless happiness and inner peace. Breakthrough Press.

2. Kelley, Thomas M. (2016). How good can you stand it? Flourishing mental health through understanding the Three Principles. Author House.

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