Answers to Chapters 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9 - End of Chapter ...

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Answers to End of Chapter Questions

Chapter 1 2

Chapter 2 4

Chapter 3 6

Chapter 4 8

Chapter 5 10

Chapter 6 12

Chapter 7 14

Chapter 8 16

Chapter 9 18

Chapter 1

|Question Number |Answer |Level 1 Head Reference for Answer |Difficulty |

|1 |C |What is an Information System? |M |

|2 |D |What are Data, Information and Knowledge |E |

|3 |E |What are Data, Information and Knowledge |M |

|4 |C |What are Data, Information and Knowledge – What is|E |

| | |Ethics | |

|5 |Data |What are Data, Information and Knowledge |E |

|6 |Information |What are Data, Information and Knowledge |E |

|7 |Knowledge |What are Data, Information and Knowledge |E |

|8 |True |What are Data, Information and Knowledge |E |

|9 |False |What are Data, Information and Knowledge |M |

|10 |False |What are Data, Information and Knowledge – Life |M |

| | |Long Knowledge Creation | |

|11 |B |What are Data, Information and Knowledge |M |

|12 |A |What are Data, Information and Knowledge |D |

|13 |C |What are Data, Information and Knowledge |D |

|14 |B |What is an Information System? |M |

|15 |A |What is an Information System? |D |

|16 |C |What is an Information System? |E |

|17 |IS For a Telecom Billing Operation |What is an Information System? |M |

| |Input: Name of customer, Mailing address, number of calls made, Types of| | |

| |calls made( International /Local) | | |

| |Process: A billing system which can take into account business | | |

| |requirements (like free local calls from 9.00pm to 7.00am and weekends) | | |

| |and usage of a customer to produce a bill | | |

| |Output: Customized bills for all customers, based on their usage which | | |

| |can be emailed as well as mailed to their addresses. | | |

|18 |The two types of knowledge are Explicit knowledge and Tacit knowledge |What are Data, Information and Knowledge |M |

| |Explicit Knowledge: is readily available to us in the form of books, | | |

| |documents and web | | |

| |Example: Textbook in Accounting | | |

| |Tacit Knowledge: is knowledge gained through experience, practice and | | |

| |insight | | |

| |Example: To parallel park our car | | |

|19 |Knowledge Work: Work that involves the discovery, transformation, |What are Data, Information and Knowledge |M |

| |analysis, synthesis, and communication of data, information, and | | |

| |knowledge. | | |

| |Knowledge Worker: It is a worker who requires formal learning, the | | |

| |ability to acquire and apply practical and theoretical knowledge and a | | |

| |habit of continuous knowledge. | | |

| |I believe that I will be knowledge worker after I graduate as I am | | |

| |undergoing formal training and my work will involve application of | | |

| |practical as well as theoretical knowledge in the knowledge based | | |

| |industry. | | |

|20 |Input: Names of all employees, name of bank, bank account number, Salary|What is an information system |M |

| |Process: software | | |

| |Output: A automated system to transfer salary from companies account to | | |

| |account of employee | | |

| |This automated system will reduce human errors and redundancy of work in| | |

| |crediting salary into the employee’s account thus reducing expenditure | | |

| |to the company. | | |

Chapter 2

|Question Number |Answer |Level 1 Head Reference for Answer |Difficulty |

|1 |b. RAM |Hardware |M |

|2 |a. cable modem |Hardware |E |

|3 |b. operating system |Software Gets the Job Done |M |

|4 |TCP/IP |The Internet and the WWW |M |

|5 |Clock |Hardware |M |

|6 |LCD |Hardware |M |

|7 |Spreadsheet |Software Gets the Job Done |M |

|8 |802.11 protocol |Connecting Over Networks |M |

|9 |False |Hardware |E |

|10 |False |The Internet and the WWW |M |

|11 |B |Hardware |D |

|12 |D |Hardware |M |

|13 |C |Hardware |M |

|14 |E |Hardware |D |

|15 |A |Hardware |M |

|16 |Accepting and storing data and information |The Components of IT |E |

| |Performing mathematical calculation | | |

| |Applying logic to make decisions | | |

| |Retrieving, displaying, and sending data and information | | |

| |Consistently repeating the above actions many times | | |

|17 |Hardware – the electronic and mechanical components that you can see and |The Components of IT |M |

| |touch | | |

| |Software – the set of instructions that directs the hardware | | |

| |Networking – allows knowledge workers to share resources including | | |

| |hardware, software and information, etc. | | |

|18 |Random Access Memory (RAM) is the primary memory that serves as a |Hardware |D |

| |temporary storage area for data and instructions. In general, since the | | |

| |CPU first looks to RAM for the data and instructions it needs, and since | | |

| |accessing RAM is faster than accessing secondary storage (e.g., a hard | | |

| |drive), more RAM means more conveniently stored, quickly accessed data | | |

| |and instruction. This means that the computer (CPU) will seem faster to | | |

| |the user with more RAM to keep more data and instructions close at hand | | |

| |for the CPU | | |

|19 |Yes. Thumb Drives (a.k.a. USB keys) offer more storage and quicker data |Hardware |M |

| |access in a smaller, more convenient package. Most PC makers have stopped| | |

| |including diskette drives as standard PC equipment. Relative to the USB | | |

| |keys, a floppy diskette’s smaller storage, slower access, and decreasing | | |

| |support by PC makers all point to the demise of the once ubiquitous | | |

| |floppy disk. | | |

|20 |While no security is infallible, in general the smaller the network (in |Connecting Over Networks |D |

| |terms of geographic size) the more easily it can be secured. As network | | |

| |size increases it is difficult to include the network within a secure | | |

| |physical location. In addition, larger networks often require some use of| | |

| |public connection media which may be more easily accessed by unauthorized| | |

| |users than private communications media. | | |

Chapter 3

|Question Number |Answer |Level 1 Head Reference for Answer |Difficulty |

|1 |B. synthesis |Knowledge Work Activities |M |

|2 |D. Data, Information, and Knowledge |Decisions, Decisions –Making Decisions at the |E |

| | |Individual Level | |

|3 |B. communication |Knowledge Work Activities |M |

|4 |D Investigate |Problem Solving |E |

|5 |Unorganized |Knowledge Work Activities |M |

|6 |CARROTS |Decisions, Decisions –Making Decisions at the |M |

| | |Individual Level | |

|7 |complete |Decisions, Decisions –Making Decisions at the |E |

| | |Individual Level | |

|8 |True |Knowledge Work Activities |M |

|9 |False |Decisions, Decisions –Making Decisions at the |D |

| | |Individual Level l | |

|10 |False |Problem Solving |M |

|11 |C |Knowledge Work Activities |D |

|12 |B |Knowledge Work Activities |D |

|13 |A |Knowledge Work Activities |D |

|14 |B |Decisions, Decisions –Making Decisions at the |M |

| | |Individual Level | |

|15 |C |Decisions, Decisions –Making Decisions at the |M |

| | |Individual Level | |

|16 |A |Decisions, Decisions –Making Decisions at the |M |

| | |Individual Level | |

|17 |Investigate – I want to buy a car so I go to Consumer Reports and other|Problem Solving |D |

| |sites to find the best cars for the environment and to and | | |

| |other sites to research prices | | |

| |Analyze – I review the data I’ve collected generating possible choices | | |

| |and develop the criteria I will use to make my choice | | |

| |Decide – I pick the solar powered Ferrari. My second choice is a Honda | | |

| |Accord Hybrid | | |

| |Do – I contact Ferrari and ask them to make one since no such car is | | |

| |available to the general public. No luck so I buy the Honda Accord | | |

| |Hybrid. | | |

|18 |Unstructured – a problem characterized by high uncertainty and no well |Decisions, Decisions –Making Decisions at the |M |

| |known method for solving the problem. |Individual Level | |

| |Example: Choose a University or College to attend | | |

| |Semi-Structured – A problem that is in-between the two extremes. Has | | |

| |some level of uncertainty in data and decision process. | | |

| |Example: Choose a major at the University or College you attend | | |

| |Structured – A problem situation which has the luxury of complete and | | |

| |certain information available and a well-known method for solving the | | |

| |problem. | | |

| |Example: Complete Major-Required Course I and major-Required Course II | | |

| |in order before taking any electives. | | |

|19 |Investigate – Identify and research the two companies and the nature of|Problem Solving |D |

| |both internships. Discover where you will be working and what you will | | |

| |be doing during your internship. | | |

| |Analyze – organize and think about the data and information you found –| | |

| |what does it mean? Which internship and/or which company appear to be | | |

| |the best fit with your immediate and future goals? Think about how what| | |

| |you will be doing in your internship may result in job offer at the end| | |

| |of the internship. Would you be willing to accept and work for this | | |

| |company? Develop criteria to help you choose between the two | | |

| |internships. | | |

| |Decide – Select the best internship for you using the criteria that you| | |

| |generated in the Analyze step. | | |

| |Do – Respond to the firm that offered you the internship you chose and | | |

| |send a note to the other firm thanking them and declining their | | |

| |internship offer. Move to new IADD cycle by investigating | | |

| |transportation to location of internship…etc. | | |

|20 |Yes. In order to solve problems, knowledge workers must make decisions.|Decisions, Decisions –Making Decisions at the |D |

| |Consider the following problems and the decisions which solve the |Individual Level and Problem Solving | |

| |problems: (1) Undecided major – decide which major to major in (2) No | | |

| |transportation to and from school – decide to walk, to ride the bus, or| | |

| |to buy a car and drive to and from school and (3) Need a local checking| | |

| |account so local merchants will cash your check – decide which local | | |

| |bank offers the best deal on student checking and open an account | | |

| |there. | | |

Chapter 4

|Question Number |Answer |Level 1 Head Reference for Answer |Difficulty |

|1 |A – Feedback |Business as Open Systems |M |

|2 |B – Create processes to achieve goals |Business as Open Systems | |

|3 |A – Automate |Applying IT to create more business value |M |

|4 |Stakeholder |Business as Open Systems |E |

|5 |Transaction |The Value Chain |E |

|6 |Complementary |How Business organize to create value |M |

|7 |Competitive Advantage |The Value Chain |E |

|8 |True |Applying IT to create more business value |M |

|9 |False |Applying IT to create more business value |M |

|10 |False |Applying IT to create more business value |M |

|11 |C |Applying IT to create more business value |M |

|12 |B |Applying IT to create more business value |E |

|13 |A |Applying IT to create more business value |E |

|14 |D |Applying IT to create more business value | M |

|15 |Functional: Ford Motors |How Business organize to create value |D |

| |Product Line: Microsoft | | |

| |Geography: GE | | |

| |Matrix: University System | | |

|16 |McDonalds Production of Hamburger |The Value Chain |M |

| |Inbound Logistics: Raw Vegetables, meat, Cheese etc | | |

| |Operations: Preparation of Hamburger | | |

| |Outbound Logistics: Big Mac | | |

| |Marketing and Sales: Advertisements on Television, Discounts and | | |

| |promotional offers | | |

| |Services: Customer satisfaction surveys, Quality assurance | | |

|17 |Manufacture of Dell Computers |Business as Open Systems |M |

| |Input | | |

| |Micro-Processors from Intel/AMD | | |

| |Knowledge Workers from Universities | | |

| |Capital from Investors and Creditors | | |

| |Operating system from Microsoft | | |

| |Technology from R&D teams | | |

| |Process | | |

| |Assembly line to manufacture Computers | | |

| |Output | | |

| |Laptops and Desktops | | |

| |Helpline services to aid customers | | |

| |Feedback from users and industry experts to help improve and innovate | | |

| |products | | |

|18 |It is essential to invest time and money in support activities of a |The value Chain |M |

| |company. For example by having active Human Resource (HR) policy and | | |

| |department can enhance employee output. Such activities add more | | |

| |business value to the organization | | |

|19 |An Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system helps an organization to |The value Chain |M |

| |effectively manage and automate its primary and secondary activities | | |

|20 |Managers in Matrix Organizations can |How Business organize to create value |M |

| |Organize team building activities | | |

| |Have inter team meeting to discuss the work they are currently handling | | |

| |Have knowledge sharing session to provide a unified knowledge base | | |

Chapter 5

|Question Number |Answer |Level 1 Head Reference for Answer |Difficulty |

|1 |B – Mainframes |The Technology Infrastructure of an Organization |E |

|2 |B – Atomicity |Information Systems that Support Business |E |

| | |Activities | |

|3 |C – Simulation Modeling |Business Intelligence |M |

|4 |D – Periodic |Beyond Databases: Using Other Methods to Store |E |

| | |Data, Information, and Knowledge | |

|5 |Embedded Processors |The Technology Infrastructure of an Organization |E |

|6 |Database |The Primary Data Storage for Organizations |E |

|7 |Foreign |The Primary Data Storage for Organizations |E |

|8 |Point of Sale (POS) |Information Systems that Support Business |M |

| | |Activities | |

|9 |False |The Technology Infrastructure of an Organization |E |

|10 |False |The Technology Infrastructure of an Organization |M |

|11 |True |The Primary Data Storage for Organizations |E |

|12 |True |Information Systems that Support Business |E |

| | |Activities | |

|13 |C |Beyond Databases: Using Other Methods to Store |E |

| | |Data, Information, and Knowledge | |

|14 |B |Beyond Databases: Using Other Methods to Store |E |

| | |Data, Information, and Knowledge | |

|15 |D |Beyond Databases: Using Other Methods to Store |E |

| | |Data, Information, and Knowledge | |

|16 |A |Beyond Databases: Using Other Methods to Store |E |

| | |Data, Information, and Knowledge | |

|17 |The file management system has the following disadvantages over Database|Databases: the Primary Data Storage for |M |

| |system |Organizations | |

| |Data Redundancy: Some information needs to be stored in more than one | | |

| |place leading to inconstancy and redundancy | | |

| |Data Dependence: As the files are designed for a particular system they | | |

| |may not be used by another application (System dependent) | | |

| |Data Inaccessibility: The data stored may not be accessible from other | | |

| |applications. | | |

| |Poor file management: The files are difficult to manage and change. It | | |

| |also has difficulties when multiple people are trying to modify the | | |

| |files at the same time. | | |

|18 |The different technologies are as follows: |The IS integration Problem |M |

| |Middleware: is software that links applications that use dissimilar | | |

| |software and hardware platforms. A middleware application tracks and | | |

| |software modules and their status and then links them over network | | |

| |connection. | | |

| |Web Services: Processes data over from a sending application and then | | |

| |delivers the data over the network using standard data format called | | |

| |XML. | | |

| |Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP): In this approach the company runs | | |

| |all its applications from a single database. Each functional unit (like | | |

| |HR, R&D, and Finance) uses their own software but linked to a common | | |

| |database. | | |

|19 |Both systems can be useful. A strength of FIS is that they are typically|Information Systems that Support Business |D |

| |created with a focus on a particular department. Thus an FIS may include|Activities | |

| |comprehensive data and tools for a specific department. However, a | | |

| |workflow management system can incorporate the data from a specific | | |

| |department and integrate it with the work and data of other departments | | |

| |that take part in the workflow. Thus, a WMS may be ultimately more | | |

| |useful to that organization as a whole. | | |

|20 |Groupware can be of use for any organization by supporting communication|Beyond Databases: Using Other Methods to Store |D |

| |between the members of the organization and by supporting group decision|Data, Information, and Knowledge | |

| |making. Groupware may be used by City and County governments to support | | |

| |meeting; to communicate information about important decisions both | | |

| |before and after decision making; and to even incorporate the view of | | |

| |the electorate through the use of voting systems. | | |

Chapter 6

|Question Number |Answer |Level 1 Head Reference for Answer |Difficulty |

|1 |B – Elaboration |The Stages and Activities of System Development |M |

|2 |A – Inception |The Stages and Activities of System Development |E |

|3 |B – Diamond Family |IS Methodology |M |

|4 |D - Risk avoidance |Managing the IS Project |E |

|5 |team composition |The People Who Develop IS |E |

|6 |Unified Programming Language (UML) |IS Methodology |M |

|7 |Integrated Development Environment (IDE). |IT Tools for IS Development |M |

|8 |False |The Stages and Activities of System Development |M |

|9 |False |IS Methodology |E |

|10 |True |The People Who Develop IS |M |

|11 |True |IT Tools for IS Development |E |

|12 |A |The Big IS Development Questions |E |

|13 |D |The Big IS Development Questions |E |

|14 |C |The Big IS Development Questions |E |

|15 |B |The Big IS Development Questions |E |

|16 |The stages of the Life cycle are: |The Stages and Activities of System Development |M |

| |1. Pre Inception: the stage in which the organization promotes or | | |

| |inhibits ideas for on Information system. | | |

| |2. Inception: In this stage the focus in on understanding the problem | | |

| |and planning the project. | | |

| |3. Elaboration: The project team finalizes the requirement and designs | | |

| |the system architecture. | | |

| |4. Construction: The development team builds the core functionalities of| | |

| |the system. | | |

| |5. Transtion: The development team finalizes the system and puts it in | | |

| |change. It also trains the users of the system and the management. | | |

| |6. Production: In this stage the organization continuously monitors, | | |

| |maintain and evaluate the system. | | |

| |7. Retirement: In this stage the old system is retired and usually leads| | |

| |to the inception of a new system, | | |

| | | | |

|17 |Entity-Relationship Diagram (ERD) |IS Methodology |E |

| |Logical Data Model | | |

| |Data Flow Diagram (DFD) | | |

| |Unified Modeling Language(UML) | | |

|18 |In the evolutionary model developers first investigate, specify and |IS Methodology |M |

| |implement a core functionality with minimum functionality. Then the | | |

| |developers evaluate the functionality and add enhancements or changes to| | |

| |it. Prototyping is used to build the system with the inputs from the | | |

| |customers. In such a development model the customer can make changes and| | |

| |enhancements to the requirements and these can be incorporated in the | | |

| |system easily | | |

| |The waterfall model is rigid in structure and is difficult to make | | |

| |changes in the previous stage once the development reaches the next | | |

| |stage of the lifecycle. Parallel process of wok cannot take place in | | |

| |the waterfall model. | | |

|19 |Ideally, we would like to have an IS in place immediately (zero |The Stages And Activities Of System Development. |D |

| |development time) and then use it forever (100% production) with no need| | |

| |for changes. Of course, we live in the real world so project managers | | |

| |must manage resources and risks while seeking to build an IS as quickly | | |

| |as possible and with the flexibility and quality to be useful in | | |

| |production for as long as possible. | | |

|20 |Managers should not only rely on financial analysis for their |The Big IS Development Questions |M |

| |feasibility. Although by obtaining the ROI, NPV and IRR gives a good | | |

| |picture about the feasibility of the project using financial benefit | | |

| |there are other intangible factors which need to be considered. Project | | |

| |managers should also consider the strengths of the organization and the | | |

| |impact of the IS project on stakeholders. For example: Customer | | |

| |satisfaction is based on the speed at which customer is able make | | |

| |transactions of the company website. A satisfied customer may lead to | | |

| |increased business. | | |

Chapter 7

|Question Number |Answer |Level 1 Head Reference for Answer |Difficulty |

|1 |C |E-Commerce: An Overview |M |

|2 |A |The E-Commerce Difference |E |

|3 |D |The E-Commerce Difference |E |

|4 |A |E-Commerce Between Organizations |E |

|5 |e-commerce |E-Commerce: An Overview |E |

|6 |E-commerce strategy |The E-Commerce Difference |E |

|7 |Infomediary |The E-Commerce Difference |M |

|8 |Supply Chain |E-Commerce Between Organizations |E |

|9 |False |E-Commerce Between Organizations |M |

|10 |True |E-Commerce: An Overview |M |

|11 |False |The E-Commerce Difference | |

|12 |True |The E-Commerce Difference |E |

|13 |B |E-Commerce for Consumers |E |

|14 |D |E-Commerce for Consumers |E |

|15 |C |E-Commerce for Consumers |E |

|16 |A |E-Commerce for Consumers |E |

|17 |A business model defines how a company will meet the needs of its |E-Commerce for Consumers |M |

| |customers while making a profit. | | |

| |Having a business model will enable them to focus on their customers and| | |

| |also make profits on a long term basis. | | |

|18 |The 3 broad categories are |E-Commerce Between Organizations |M |

| |Spot Buying | | |

| |Strategic Sourcing | | |

| |Exchange | | |

|19 |Benefits |E-Commerce for Consumers |M |

| |Lower Prices | | |

| |Shopping 24/7 | | |

| |Greater Searchability | | |

| |Shorter Delivery times for digital Products | | |

| |Sharing of information with other consumers | | |

| |Improved customer service | | |

| |Limitations | | |

| |Delay in receiving physical products | | |

| |Slow downloads in areas where high speed internet is limited | | |

| |Security and privacy concerns | | |

| |Inability to touch, feel and see product | | |

| |Unavailability of micropayments for purchase of small cost products | | |

|20 |E-commerce is affecting business in the following ways: |The E-Commerce Difference |M |

| |Reducing barriers to entry | | |

| |Preventing any company from “owning” the market | | |

| |Enhancing collaboration/alliances | | |

| |Multiplying market niches | | |

| |Changing marketplace drivers | | |

| |e-commerce is also leading to | | |

| |Information density: Increasing the quality and the quantity of | | |

| |information to the customer. | | |

| |Mass Customization: The method in which customized products or services | | |

| |can be provided on demand | | |

| |Personalization of Marketing goods | | |

Chapter 8

|Question Number |Answer |Level 1 Head Reference for Answer |Difficulty |

|1 |D – All of the above |Second-Generation E-Commerce Technologies: |E |

| | |Providing Interaction | |

|2 |A – Cookie |Second-Generation E-Commerce Technologies: |E |

| | |Providing Interaction | |

|3 |D –WSDL |Fourth-Generation E-Commerce Technologies: |M |

| | |Transforming Processes | |

|4 |C –Web Client |Second-Generation E-Commerce Technologies: |M |

| | |Providing Interaction | |

|5 |Fourth |The Stages of E-commerce |E |

|6 |Scripting Language |Second-Generation E-Commerce Technologies: |E |

| | |Providing Interaction | |

|7 |Response |Second-Generation E-Commerce Technologies: |E |

| | |Providing Interaction | |

|8 |A(n) Applet |Second-Generation E-Commerce Technologies: |M |

| | |Providing Interaction | |

|9 |False |First-Generation E-Commerce Technologies: |E |

| | |Establishing a Web Presence | |

|10 |False |Second-Generation E-Commerce Technologies: |M |

| | |Providing Interaction | |

|11 |False |Second-Generation E-Commerce Technologies: |E |

| | |Providing Interaction | |

|12 |True |Fourth-Generation E-Commerce Technologies: |E |

| | |Transforming Processes | |

|13 |C |Third-Generation E-Commerce Technologies: |E |

| | |Supporting Transactions | |

|14 |D |First-Generation E-Commerce Technologies: |E |

| | |Establishing a Web Presence | |

|15 |A |Third-Generation E-Commerce Technologies: |E |

| | |Supporting Transactions | |

|17 |The 4 tier e-commerce infrastructure has the following components: |Second-Generation E-Commerce Technologies: |M |

| |Web Client: Enter the URL and you send an |Providing Interaction | |

| |HTTP request to a Web serve | | |

| |Web Server: Receives request and decides on how to send response back to| | |

| |the client server. It request is static then sends back response but it | | |

| |the request is dynamic then the web server routes the request to the | | |

| |client and application server. | | |

| |Application Server: If needed the server performs queries on the data | | |

| |server to get the requested data. | | |

| |Data/File Server: Stores data that may be needed for the E-commerce | | |

| |transaction. | | |

|18 |XML (eXtensible Markup Language) uses tags to mark up content and/or |Fourth-Generation E-Commerce Technologies: |M |

| |data so that applications can recognize it. The goal of XML is to |Transforming Processes | |

| |describe data. | | |

| |XML tags allow applications to understand the underlying meaning of data| | |

| |and then react appropriately. For example, an tag may signal | | |

| |to an on-line application that the incoming data represents an invoice | | |

| |for an ordered product and then the application can process the data | | |

| |accordingly. | | |

|19 |The features often looked for in an e-commerce website include: |Fourth-Generation E-Commerce Technologies: |M |

| |interactivity and security. These are critical for the effective usage |Transforming Processes | |

| |of e-commerce. | | |

| |The fear of lost data and identity theft can make many nervous about | | |

| |using e-commerce. | | |

|20 |Students may mention technologies such as: |Fourth-Generation E-Commerce Technologies: |D |

| |AJAX |Transforming Processes | |

| |Blogging | | |

| |RSS | | |

| |VOIP | | |

Chapter 9

|Question Number |Answer |Level 1 Head Reference for Answer |Difficulty |

|1 |A |Corporate and IT Governance |E |

|2 |Transfer (This choice does not exists) |Enterprise Risk Management |M |

|3 |C |Enterprise Risk Management |D |

|4 |D |Enterprise Risk Management |M |

|5 |Near sourcing |A Global Perspective |E |

|6 |Off shoring |A Global Perspective |M |

|7 |Enterprise Risk Management |Enterprise Risk Management |M |

|8 |Applicable risk |Enterprise Risk Management |M |

|9 |False |Global IS and Global IT |M |

|10 |False |Global IS and Global IT |E |

|11 |True |Global IS and Global IT |E |

|12 |True |A Global Perspective |M |

|13 |B |Enterprise Risk Management |M |

|14 |A |Enterprise Risk Management |M |

|15 |C |Enterprise Risk Management |M |

|16 |The congress passed the Sarbanes Oxley act in 2002 to restore public and|Enterprise Risk Management |D |

| |investor’s trust in public accounting and reporting of publicly traded | | |

| |companies. | | |

| |After the Enron and World Com financial frauds the SOX held the CEO and | | |

| |the CFO liable and responsible for the financial statements produced by | | |

| |the company. The SOX required more documentation of process, decreased | | |

| |the time between reporting financial statements, and prohibited | | |

| |accounting firms from selling their non audit business to the companies.| | |

|17 |A global perspective is a world wide approach to business that seeks to |A Global Perspective |E |

| |create business value in an economic world that is largely flat, | | |

| |borderless and cyber connected. | | |

| |Example: GE off shoring its billing operations to India, thus saving | | |

| |money for itself and creating jobs and revenue in India. | | |

|18 |Four challenges to IT Globalization are identified by Ives and Jarvenpaa|Global IS and Global IT |D |

| |on page 271 of text, they are: (1) the linkage of global IT to global | | |

| |business strategy; (2) Information Technology platforms; (3) | | |

| |International data sharing; and (4) cultural environment. Here is a | | |

| |possible answer if the student chooses (4) “Cultural environment:” | | |

| |The answer to this depends on your point of view. For example, you might| | |

| |believe that cultural environments are the most serious challenge to IT | | |

| |globalization. If so, then successfully competing on a global scale | | |

| |requires more than just native speaking IT professionals or knowledge | | |

| |workers. A truly global organization is aware of and embraces the | | |

| |diversity inherent in different cultures. An organization would be | | |

| |committed to education and training of its knowledge workers in cultural| | |

| |differences, languages, etc. Also, HR policies would rotate IT managers | | |

| |and IT employees through various locations to enable them to gain | | |

| |firsthand knowledge and experience of various cultures. Also, IT | | |

| |departments would be mindful of cultural environments when developing | | |

| |websites, global IS, etc. | | |

|19 |Enterprise Information Security is defined on page 284 of the text as |Enterprise Information Security |D |

| |“an ongoing, strategic business process of risk and threat assessment | | |

| |and management, which helps to ensure safe and continuous business | | |

| |operation and the availability, confidentiality, and integrity of an | | |

| |enterprise’s information resources wherever they might be located. | | |

| |Availability means that the business has access to whatever information | | |

| |resource it needs to create business value. Confidentiality addresses | | |

| |the need to keep safe certain types of sensitive information and to | | |

| |restrict access to this information to authorized users. Integrity as | | |

| |related to information means ensuring that the facts, events, knowledge,| | |

| |etc., captured and stored in information systems is accurate and | | |

| |complete (see “CARROTS” in Chapter 3). The threats and risks include | | |

| |unauthorized access, compromise, theft, loss, etc and a complete answer | | |

| |would address several of these. “Recent” examples of public and private | | |

| |organizational risk will include those from the text such as the | | |

| |“Kaiser…” example on page 286, as well as examples from current | | |

| |headlines such as “Homeland Security Admits Privacy Errors in | | |

| |Anti-Terror Effort.” The integration and exposure of sensitive data is | | |

| |an increasing risk faced by modern organizations. While Kaiser received | | |

| |fines, the Department of Homeland Security faces the risks of loss of | | |

| |credibility, possible reduced effectiveness, and of litigation. | | |

| |“( | |

| |P25A) | | |

|20 |The PPT framework is: |Enterprise Information Security |M |

| |[pic] | | |

| |People – refers to the members of an organization and the roles that | | |

| |they play. | | |

| |Technology – includes tools, methods and mechanisms to support | | |

| |organizational processes. | | |

| |Policy – represents the documented rules for governance. | | |

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