First Grade Literacy Schedule - Humble ISD

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|Monday |Tuesday |Wednesday |Thursday | |

|First Independent |Students are greeted every morning with interesting books of many different genres and opportunities to talk with friends and share their thinking as readers. |

|Reading | |

| |A time to warm-up for the more rigorous reading that follows. Students may choose challenging books of high interest, easy books, familiar Big Books. etc. |

|15 minutes |This gives the teacher an opportunity to conference with students, take a running record, and work one-on-one. |

| |Continue to monitor if students are choosing |Continue to conference with students one-on-one.|Continue to monitor if students are choosing |Continue to conference with students one-on-one.|

| |“just right” books. | |“just right” books. | |

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|Community Share |Give a book talk (mini book commercial) on |Focus: Students can share their thinking with |Focus: Students can share their thinking with a|Focus: Students can share their thinking with a|

| |one or two books from the classroom library |others about a favorite book they have read. |partner and listen to a partner share their |partner and listen to a partner share their |

|15 minutes |to arouse students’ interest. | |thinking. |thinking. |

| | |Encourage students to give book talks. | | |

| | | |Students share their “news” with group. |Students share their “news” with group. |

| | | |Encourage others how to listen, to ask |Encourage others how to listen, to ask |

| | | |questions, and to connect to their experiences. |questions, and to connect to their experiences. |

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|Shared Reading |Shared Reading Focus: |Shared Reading Focus: |Shared Reading Focus: |Shared Reading Focus: |

| |Students can infer to make predictions based | | | |

|15 minutes |on the title, cover and book walk. |Students can use context and their thinking to |Students can look for words that begin or end |Students can respond to their reading. |

| | |infer meaning from cloze passages. |with diagraphs. | |

| |Students can make meaningful connections to | | | |

| |the story to help them understand what they | | | |

| |read. | | | |

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| |See 4 day Guided Reading lesson plan | | | |

|Interactive |Interactive Read Aloud Lesson-Inferring |Interactive Read Aloud Lesson-Inferring | Interactive Read Aloud |Interactive Read Aloud |

|Read Aloud | | |Lesson – Context Clues |Lesson Continued - |

| | | | |Context Clues |

|15 minutes |Focus: Students can make inferences when |Focus: Students can make inferences when they | | |

| |they read. |read. |Focus: Students can infer the meaning of words |Focus: Students can infer the meaning of words |

| | | |by using the clues in the story. |by using the clues in the story. |

| |Monday |Tuesday |Wednesday |Thursday |

|Independent Reading |Continue to conference one-on-one with |Continue to conference one-on-one with students |Continue to conference one-on-one with students |Continue to conference one-on-one with students |

| |students reading independently and at their |reading independently and at their work |reading independently and at their work |reading independently and at their work |

| |work stations. Keep observational notes. |stations. Keep observational notes. |stations. Keep observational notes. |stations. Keep observational notes. |

|Independent Work | | | | |

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|Guided Reading | | | | |

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|60 minutes | | | | |

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| |Students will meet in small groups for reading instruction: |

| |Work with your students at their instructional reading level (text that can be read with 93%-to 96% accuracy). |

| |We support & scaffold the reader & help the child read as independently as possible. |

| |We want each student to problem-solve & apply the strategies that have been MODELED IN WHOLE GROUP INSTRUCTION. |

| |After a book has been introduced and read in guided reading, add it to the child’s independent reading box/bag. |

| |Other students are engaged in independent reading, independent work, or literacy stations. |

|Word Work |Focus: Students can notice and understand |Focus: Students can notice and understand that |Focus: Students can notice and understand that |Focus: Students can change beginning, middle, |

| |that ch, sh, th, and wh pairs stand for one |ch, sh, th, and wh pairs stand for one sound. |ch, sh, th, and wh pairs stand for one sound. |and ending letters to make new words. |

|15 minutes |sound. | | | |

| | | |Students can hear each sound in a consonant | |

| | | |cluster and make new words with consonant | |

| | | |clusters. | |

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| | |Lesson-Week Four |Lesson-Week Four |Lesson-Week Four |

| |Lesson-Week Four | | | |

|Independent Writing |Interactive Read Aloud |Interactive Read Aloud |Interactive Read Aloud |Set up for students to compare their writing |

| |Lesson – Word Choice |Lesson – Word Choice continued – “Callie the |Lesson – Word Choice continued – “Harvey’s Run” |from the first day of summer school until now. |

| | |Cow” | | |

|40 minutes |Rosie’s Walk | | |Have them choose their best piece and tell why. |

| | | |Focus: Students can use sound words in their |Have them write a self-evaluation; why they |

| |Focus: Students can make careful word |Focus: Students can make careful word choices |own writing. |chose the piece; their favorite, what they did |

| |choices that tell as much as possible. |that tell as much as possible. | |well, what they need to work on as a writer, |

| | | | |etc. |

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| |Allow time for some to share with the whole |Allow time for some to share with the whole |Allow time for some to share with the whole |Celebrate their writing. |

| |group or with partners. |group or with partners. |group or with partners. | |

| | | | |Students could rotate groups, taking turns |

| | | | |sharing their best/favorite piece or share with |

| | | | |another class |

|Read Aloud | |Read Aloud |Read Aloud |Read Aloud |

| |Read Aloud | | | |

|Dismissal | | | | |

Interactive Read Aloud – Infer

|MENTOR TEXT: No, David! by David Shannon |

|Choose a text that is worthwhile, familiar, and available. Other texts that might be used for inferring include Where The Wild Things Are, Have You Seen My |

|Duckling?, The Polar Express, Good Dog Carl, Officer Buckle and Gloria, Miss Maggie, How Many Days to America?, Grandfather Twilight, Fly Away Home, Fireflies. |

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|FOCUS STRATEGY: Making Inferences |

|Readers infer when they take what they already know, their background knowledge, and merge it with clues in the text to draw a conclusion, surface a theme, |

|predict an outcome, arrive at a big idea, and so forth. If readers don’t infer, they will not grasp the deeper essence of texts they read. |

|Readers determine meanings of unknown words by using their schema, paying attention to textual and picture clues, rereading, and engaging in conversations with |

|others. |

|Readers make predictions about text and confirm or contradict their predictions as they read on. |

|Readers use their prior knowledge and textual clues to draw conclusions and form unique interpretations of text. |

|Readers know to infer when the answers to their questions are not explicitly stated in the text. |

|FOCUS THE LEARNING |

|Introduction: [Write “infer” on the chalkboard.) Life is full of opportunities to look at the clues we are given and then to infer what the clue might mean. |

|Example: If we smell something really sweet on the way to the cafeteria, we might infer that we are having cookies or cake or something sweet for lunch. If we |

|see big black clouds outside, we infer that it might rain. While we read No, David! By David Shannon, we are going to think about the clues the author gives us |

|and make inferences from those clues. |

|INTERACTIVE READ-ALOUD: MODEL AND GUIDED PRACTICE |

|Show The Cover And Read The Title. Then pause to think aloud. I am going to stop reading for a minute and think about clues that might help me to infer. It |

|looks like this boy is trying to pull the fishbowl off of the table and everything is about to crash. The title says, “No, David!” so I am going to infer that a |

|mom or dad is yelling at him to stop pulling on the fishbowl. |

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|Turn To The Title Page. As I look at the title page, I can see that it is a woman’s body. So now I can infer that the person who wants David to stop is a woman;|

|maybe a mom, a grandma, or a babysitter. |

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|END OF STORY REFLECTION |

|We have been able to make so many inferences with this book. The author didn’t use a lot of words, but he sure gave us a lot of clues about what was happening so|

|we could infer. |

|Turn & Talk: What was your favorite inference in this book? |

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|LINK TO ONGOING WORK: During small group reading instruction, help the students find places where they can infer. Focus students on inferences they can make in |

|school. Thomas put his jacket on, he must be cold. |

|ASSESS THE LEARNING: Listen in as partners converse about inferences they were able to make while listening to No, David! Confer with readers to see if they can|

|make inferences within the classroom about a drawing or about their reading, etc. |

Interactive Read Aloud (cont.)

FOCUS: Making Inferences

No David continued

FOCUS THE LEARNING

[Place text on chart or overhead. Using a sheet of paper, expose only the first line of text.]

Explain to the students that our inferences affect the way we read.

TEACHING POINT AND MODEL/DEMONSTRATION

GUIDED PRACTICE/ACTIVE ENGAGEMENT

Model reading line 1 in a monotone, lifeless voice. What could we infer about the person who talked like that? Then model it again with gusto, really showing emotion. What could we infer about a person who said it now?

Model reading that sounds sleepy, angry, in a hurry. Repeat for each line.

David, be quiet

Don’t play with your food

Go to your room

Will you PLEASE sit still

It is time for a bath

LINK TO ONGOING WORK

Look for inferences in additional Read Alouds and ask students to use the stem, “I can infer…” to share their observations.

During small group reading instruction, help the students find places where they can infer.

ASSESS THE LEARNING

Confer with readers to see if they can make inferences within the classroom about a drawing or about a reading selection.

Interactive Read Aloud – Context Clues

|MENTOR TEXT: Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak |

|Choose a text that is worthwhile, familiar, and available. Other texts that might be used for inferring include Chrysanthemum, Owen, Stellaluna, Lon Po Po, |

|Officer Buckle and Gloria. |

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|FOCUS STRATEGY: Context Clues |

|Readers infer when they take what they already know, their background knowledge, and merge it with clues in the text to draw a conclusion, surface a theme, |

|predict an outcome, arrive at a big idea, and so forth. If readers don’t infer, they will not grasp the deeper essence of texts they read. |

|Readers determine meanings of unknown words by using their schema, paying attention to textual and picture clues, rereading, and engaging in conversations with |

|others. |

|Readers make predictions about text and confirm or contradict their predictions as they read on. |

|Readers use their prior knowledge and textual clues to draw conclusions and form unique interpretations of text. |

|Readers know to infer when the answers to their questions are not explicitly stated in the text. |

|Readers create interpretations to enrich and deepen their experience in a text. |

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|FOCUS THE LEARNING |

|Introduction: Today we are going to enjoy Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak by seeing this familiar story through new eyes. We are going to read and |

|think about the wonderful words that the author has selected. I am going to use this chart to help us keep track of the wonderful words we explore today. |

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|Wonderful Words |

|Possible Meanings |

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|INTERACTIVE READ-ALOUD: MODEL AND GUIDED PRACTICE |

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|END OF STORY REFLECTION |

|We found lots of wonderful words in this book, and we were able to use the pictures and the sentences around the words to think about their meaning. Let’s think |

|about the words we wrote on our chart and select some to act out! After you have time to think together, we will have some of you act out your words from the |

|chart while the rest of us guess which words you are sharing. |

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|Turn & Talk: Turn & talk to your partner. What was your favorite word on the chart? What clues helped you to know what it meant? How might you act it out? |

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|LINK TO ONGOING WORK |

|During small group instruction, guide children to stop when they don’t understand a word or phrase and use context clues. |

|ASSESS THE LEARNING |

|Listen in as partners converse about word meanings and the contextual clues they are using to determine meaning. |

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|Confer with readers during independent reading to see if they can determine the meaning of unknown words using context clues. |

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|During small group instruction, guide conversations around interesting vocabulary to assess learner’s ability to use context as well as phonics for word solving. |

Word Study – Early Readers

Letter/Sound Relationship

Digraph Knowledge

I can notice and understand that ch, sh, th, & wh pairs stand for one sound each.

Activity 1 – Summary Chart

1. Let the children know they are about to learn more about consonant clusters that have one sound. Suggested Language: You know that sh makes one sound like /sh/ in the beginning of she. You also know that sh can be at the end of a word. Have the children read the examples for sh at the end of the word. Invite students to give examples of both.

2. Write the words chick and much. Invite the children to give two or three examples of words that start like chick. Invite them to give two or three examples of words that end like much.

3. Write the words the and tooth at the top of two adjoining columns. Invite the children to give examples of each. List on chart.

4. Finally, write the word wheel on the top of a column and invite children to give examples of words that begin like wheel.

5. As a review, invite the children to read each column of words again. Ask them to talk about what they notice.

|sh |ch |wh |th |

|she fish |chick much |wheel |the tooth |

|shoe brush |cheese teach |when where |this bath |

|ship trash |chip much |whale white |that mouth |

Link

Shared Reading: After reading, have children highlight diagraphs at the beginning, middle, or end of words.

Guided Reading: After reading and discussing a text, have the children locate words that begin with any of the digraphs. During word work, write a few words that begin or end with consonant digraphs on a whiteboard for the children to read quickly.

Interactive Writing: When the children want to write a word that has a consonant cluster that makes one sound, make connection to the words on the summary chart. Highlight letter clusters on pieces of interactive writing the children have produced.

Independent Writing: Encourage the children to refer to the summary chart until they can write words with consonant digraphs independently.

Word Study – Early Readers (cont.)

Digraph Knowledge

I can notice and understand that ch, sh, th, & wh pairs stand for one sound each.

Activity 2 – Tongue Twisters-Good for reviewing consonants. Do one or two a day.

1. Say them and have students repeat them after you.

2. Write the tongue twisters on a chart or poster and call attention to the first letter(s).

3. Have students read them several times. Use student names to start. Billy’s baby brother bopped Betty. Students can also create them.

Tongue Twisters with SH, CH, TH, AND WH

1. The word wall should contain key words that begin with these sounds before using with a tongue twister.

2. For each Tongue Twister, underline the first two letters (sh, ch, th, wh) in each word. Children cheer for cheeseburgers and chocolate. Sherry Shivers when she showers. Whitney whistles at wheels and whales.

Guess The Covered Word

Learning to Cross-Check

I can look at the first letter and think about what would make sense to help me figure out a word.

Activity 3 – Guess the Covered Word With Sh, Ch, Th, & Wh

The ability to use the consonants in a word along with the context is an important decoding strategy. Children must learn to do two things simultaneously—think about what would make sense and think about letters and sounds. Most would prefer to do one or the other, but not both.

In order to help children cross-check meaning with sound, do the following:

1. First, have children guess a missing word that has no letters revealed. There are generally many possibilities for a word that will fit the context.

2. Next reveal some letters to narrow the number of possibilities

3. Finally, show all the letters and help children confirm the word that makes sense and matches the letters.

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|Carl likes to eat ch |

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Include words with s, sh, c, ch, t, th, w, wh. - Do you like watermelon? I like wheat bread.

Word Study – Early Readers (cont.)

Word-Solving Actions

Making Words

I can change beginning, middle, and ending letters to make new words.

Activity 4 – Making Words

In this activity children arrange letters to make words. Students begin my making little words using a few of the letters and then progress to bigger words. The final word includes all the letters.

Step 1: Children have the letters: e, I, n, r, t. w (you can have the students write the letters and cut them out to use. Keep the letters in a baggie for the week, for students to work with independently)

The teacher gives directions to change letters to make new words. Make sure each child says the word before moving letters. After each word, write the correct spelling on the board. Examples:

e, I, n, r, t. w

(put each word on a card)

in-tin-ten-net-wet-win-twin-went-rent-tire-wire twine-winter

➢ Take 2 letters and make the word in. Say in with me.

➢ Add a letter to make the 3-letter word, tin. Some cans are made of tin. Let’s all say tin.

➢ Now change the vowel and tin will become ten. You have ten fingers and ten toes. Say ten.

➢ Move the letters in ten around to turn your ten into a net. He caught the fish in a net. Say net.

➢ Now change just one letter and net can become wet. When it’s raining, you get wet. Say wet.

➢ The last 3-letter word is win…

➢ Now we are going to make some 4-letter words. Add one letter to win and you will have twin. My friend has a twin sister. Stretch out the sounds you hear yourself saying.

➢ Take all your letters and start over. Make another 4-letter word—went. We went swimming today. Say went.

➢ The next 4-letter word has only 3 letters you can hear. Make tire. My bike had a flat tire. Figure out what letter is in tire but you can’t hear. Say tire.

➢ Now let’s make a 5-letter word-twine. Twine is a heavy string we use to tie things. Say twine.

➢ Has anyone figured out the secret word? Winter-use all your letters to make winter. Stretch it out and use all your letters.

Step 2: Sorting Words

After the children have made the secret word, have them use the large word cards to sort for a variety of patterns. Begin with the word win and have them find the other words that begin with w-wet, went, wire, and winter.

They can sort for rhyming words, words that start or end the same, etc.

Step 3: Transferring Words

Remind the children that knowing some words can help them read and spell the rhyming words. Write a few words and have children use the rhymes they have already sorted to decode them: fire jet

Say a few words that rhyme with the sorted words and have students decide how they would spell the words you said: tent pin

Word Study – Early Readers (cont.)

More Making Words Lessons

Letters: i f g s t

Make: if is it sit fit fits fist sift gift gifts

Sort for: s f -it -ift

Transfer Words: lit sit lift shift

Letters: e e n p r s t

Make: net pet pets pest nest rest rent sent spent enter pester present (and serpent)

Sort for: n p r -et -est -ent pest-pester

Transfer Words: wet west went tent

Letters: a e c d l n s

Make: as an can Dan and sand land clan clean dance dances cleans candle candles

Sort for: c cl -an -and s pairs

Transfer Words: band man than hand

Making Words With Blends

Letters: a e b c h n r s

Make: Ben ban ran bran barn race brace beach reach ranch branch ranches branches

Sort for: b r br; -an -ace -anch -each

Transfer Words: plan teach trace place

Letters: a e l n p s t

Make: pat pet let pan plan pant past last lane late plate plane plant planet planets

Sort for: p l pl; -an -ant -ast -ate -ane

Transfer Words: chant blast date fast

Word Study – Letter/Sound Relationships

Making Words-Consonant Clusters

I can hear each sound in a consonant cluster.

Materials: Magnetic letters

Activity 5:

Work with two or three consonant clusters in each lesson, (cr, dr, fl, sp, sl, sc, etc.)

1. Explain to children that they are going to learn something new about consonants.

2. Suggested language: You have been learning a lot about consonants and the sounds that go with them. There are some consonants that go together in many words, and they are called consonant clusters.

3. Show a picture of a tree and have the children say the word with you.

4. Make tree with magnetic letters and ask the children to read it.

5. Explain that tree starts with t and the next letter is r. You can ask the children to name the letters.)

6. Suggested language: T and r go together in many words. Tr is called a consonant cluster. Say tree.

7. Work with the children to help them understand and hear both the t and r in tree. It will be tricky because tr is very close to the sound of ch.

8. Show pictures and make several more examples of words that begin with the consonant cluster tr, for example, truck, train, triangle.

9. It will also be effective to simply say words clearly, write them on the board or make them with magnetic letters, and have children thing about the first two or three letters that make the consonant cluster (for example, try, tray, trick, treat, trash, trail, trip).

Link

Shared Reading: Point out consonant clusters in texts that the children are reading. Students highlight consonant clusters they notice in the text.

Guided Reading: Children locate words that begin with consonant clusters. After reading, have the children go back to look at one or two examples of words that begin with consonant clusters.

Independent Writing: Encourage the children to hear and represent sounds of consonant clusters in their writing.

Word Study – Letter/Sound Relationships (cont.)

Word Solving Actions

Making New Words-Changing Word Parts

I can change the first part or the last part to make a new word.

Materials: Magnetic letters

Activity 6:

1. Mention to children that you are going to show them how to change parts of words.

2. Suggested language: You know how to change the first letter and the last letter in words. Take a look at this part [put ing on the board to the right]. What does this part say? The word is…. Spr is the first part and ing is the last part. Watch this. [Change spr to br.] What does it say now? [Change br to th.] Now what does it say?

3. Next change the ing to at. What does it say now? Change the ing to ink. What does it say now?

4. Repeat with chair-fair; frame-game; meet-street, and store-more. So you can change the first part or the last part to make a new word.

Word Study – Letter/Sound Relationships (cont.)

Making Words-Consonant Clusters

I can hear each sound in a consonant cluster.

Materials: Magnetic letters or blank chart

Activity 7 – Word Sort

1. Let the children know that today you’re going to help them notice more about the letters in words.

2. Starting with a blank chart, write seven words or make them with magnetic letter (brown, tree, green, frog, crayon, pray, draw) at the top of seven columns. Ask the children what they notice about the words. They will notice that all words begin with two consonants and the second one is r.

3. Explain to the children that there are several consonant clusters that have r as a second letter and that together you are going to make a chart with words for each pattern. Invite the children to give two or three additional examples to create a reference chart.

4. Write the title “Consonant Cluster with r” at the head of the columns. Suggested language: you know a lot of words that have consonant clusters with r. Add to the chart as students find more words.

5. Using word cards with br, tr, gr, fr, cr, pr, and dr, have students sort the words (using a pocket chart) according to consonant clusters. Help them read the words, using the parts they know.

Link

Shared Reading: Point out consonant clusters in texts that the children are reading. Students highlight consonant clusters they notice in the text.

Guided Reading: Children locate words that begin with consonant clusters. After reading, have the children go back to look at one or two examples of words that begin with consonant clusters.

Independent Writing: Encourage the children to hear and represent sounds of consonant clusters in their writing.

Interactive Read Aloud – Writing - Word Choice

|MENTOR TEXT: Rosie’s Walk by Pat Hutchins |

|Choose a text that is worthwhile, familiar, and available. Other wonderful books that could be used for lessons on word choice include Diary of a Worm, |

|Chrysanthemum, Snowflake Bentley, The Snowman, Owl Moon. |

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|FOCUS STRATEGY: Writing-Word Choice |

|FOCUS THE LEARNING |

|Introduction: Today I am going to ask you to think together about the words we choose in talking and writing and how important it is to choose words that tell |

|exactly what we mean. For example, I could say “_____” (name a child), please stand up.” Now watch what happens when I say “___, please stand up quickly!” I |

|chose words that gave more information, and it had a different result. Here is another example. I could ask someone to walk to the door, or I could ask someone |

|to tiptoe to the door. |

|Turn & Talk: Share your thinking. What is the difference between walk and tiptoe? |

|We are going to read Rosie’s Walk by Pat Hutchins. Pay attention to the words she chooses and how much they tell us about what is happening. |

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|INTERACTIVE READ-ALOUD: MODEL AND GUIDED PRACTICE |

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|END OF STORY REFLECTION |

|Let’s think together about some of the helpful words that Pat Hutchins used in this book. I remember she used around and across. |

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|Turn & Talk: Which helpful words are you remembering? |

|Word Choice MiniLessons Continued |

|Day 2 Use Handout 1 |

|“Callie the Cow”-Work with the students to make careful word choices that tell as much as possible. After you create the story, students might enjoy acting it |

|out. Reading it chorally or taking a copy home. |

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|Day 3 Use Handout 2 |

|“Harvey’s Run”- Talk about the word choices in the poem and how they help us understand what is happening. Assign a few students to make the sounds to go with |

|each line. Ask them to think about using sound words in their own writing. |

Callie the cow went for a walk. She went

the slippery rock and ___________

the branch of the tree. She ________________ up

the hill and ________________ the barn. She was

really hungry so she_______________

______________.

“Harvey’s Run”

By Linda Hoyt

Harvey the horse went for a run (clip, clop)

Through the grass (swish, swish)

Under the tree (crunch, crunch)

Over the fence (yee ha)

Into the barn (clip, clop)

Just in time for dinner

© 2007 by Linda Hoyt from Interactive Read-Alouds, K–1 (Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann). This page may be reproduced for classroom use only.

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Support the children in remembering that illustrations are vitally important context clues and should be used as a support when trying to determine word meaning.

Read To The Place Where Max Was Sent To His Room. I am going to stop and think about the word “mischief.” I am going to write “mischief” on our chart. We can tell by the pictures that Max is pounding nails into walls to make a tent. Ooh! I don’t imagine most parents would want him to do that. He is chasing the dog with a fork. Not good, Max! Then he tells his mom he will eat her up! I am thinking that mischief might mean trouble, problems, naughtiness. I am going to write these ideas on the chart and now I am going to try the sentence on page 1 replacing “mischief” with each of the other words we listed.

Turn & Talk: Partners, what do you think? Do those words mean the same as mischief? How did you know?

Read To The Place Where Max Is Sailing In The Boat. Here is another wonderful word. It says “an ocean tumbled by with a private boat for Max.” “Tumbled” belongs on our chart for sure.

Turn & Talk: Think together. What might “tumbled” mean? We will write your ideas on the chart and then try them in the sentence.

Read To The Place Where The Wild Things Roar Their Terrible Roars. Here is another terrific word for our chart, “gnashed.”

Turn & Talk: What might “gnashed” mean? Think together. Then we will try your ideas in the sentence.

Read To The End Stopping Frequently To Enjoy Looking At Pictures and Sentences To Determine Word Meaning. Words to watch for: “terrible,” ” tamed,” “blinking,” “rumpus,” “wild,” “roared,” “private.”

Read To The Page Where David Is Reaching For The Cookie Jar.

Turn & Talk: Turn to your thinking partner. What can you infer? What is David trying to do? The words are “No, David! What does the person saying those words really want?

Read To The Page Where David Is In The Bathtub.

Turn & Talk: Think with your partner. What can we infer here? Use the stem, “I can infer that______.

Continue Reading. Pause after each two-page spread to have partners infer what David is doing and what the speaker wants to have happen. Have the partners use the stem “I can infer______” as they share their thinking.

Read Pages 1 & 2 (Across The Yard). I am thinking about the words used in this book and what they tell me. I think the words “across the yard” tell me a lot. The author could have said Rosie “went for a walk,” but I would have been wondering where Rosie walked. By using the words “across the yard,” I know Rosie didn’t walk around in a circle; she went in a line across the yard. Who can show us how you would walk across our classroom?

Look At The Pages Where The Fox Steps On The Rake. Look What Happened While She Was Walking Across The Yard!

Turn & Talk: Share your thinking on what might be happening. What could we say about what is happening to the fox? What words should we choose?

Turn To The Page About The Pond. Now it says Rosie went “around the pond.” How is “around” different from “across?”

Turn & Talk: Turn to your thinking partner. Are these words the same, or are they different? What do they help us understand?

Continue To The End Of The Story. Pause occasionally to point out word choices and give partners time to talk.

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