Course Discipline and

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GAVILAN cOLLEGE

cURRICULUM dEVELOPMENT

|form C |

|Modify or Inactivate an Existing Course |

|Date: |02/2012 |Prepared & Submitted by: |Sherrean Carr |

|Department: |CTE |Course Discipline and Number: |JLE 121 |

|1. |What is the effective term? |

| |Fall Spring Summer Year: 2011 |

|2. | Inactivate Course(s): (Inactivating a course will remove it from the course catalog. Courses may be re-activated by updating the course |

| |and bringing it back to the Curriculum Committee for approval. Transferable courses will need to be re-articulated, should you decide to |

| |reactivate the course.) |

| |           |

| |Reason for inactivation:       |

|3. | Modification of the following: (Attach existing course outline, note changes as appropriate. Update Prerequisite/Advisory Form, if |

| |appropriate ) |

| Number | Hours | Prerequisite/Advisory | Discipline |

| Title | Units | Description | Content |

| Grading | GE Applicability | Repeatability | Transferability |

| General Update | Reinstate Course | Cross list course with       |

| Update Textbook | Other (please describe.)       |

|FROM: |JLE 121 |Advanced Officer Training |.5-1 |20-40 |      |

| |Discipline & Number |Course Title |Units |Lec |Lab |

| | | | |Hours per |Hours per |

| | | | |week |week |

|TO: |JLE 121 |Advanced Officer Training |.5-2 |.34-.57 |1.6-2.97 |

| |Discipline & Number |Course Title |Units |Lec |Lab |

| | | | |Hours per |Hours per |

| | | | |week |week |

|Reason for modification: General Updating |

|4. |Will this course be offered via distance education? Yes No |

| |If yes, fill out Form D – Distance Education form. |

|5. |Routing/Recommendation for Approval |

| | |Signatures | | |Approval |

| |Dept. Approval (Chair Sign) | |Date | |Yes ___ |No ___ |

| |Area Dean | |Date | |Yes ___ |No ___ |

| |Curriculum Committee Chair | |Date | |Yes ___ |No ___ |

| |VP of Instruction | |Date | |Yes ___ |No ___ |

| |Superintendent/President For District | | | |Yes ___ |No ___ |

| |Board | | | | | |

| |CCC Chancellor’s Office | | Date | |Yes ___ |No ___ |

| |(if applicable) | | | | | |

GAVILAN COLLEGE

CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT

|COURSE OUTLINE | |

|DISCIPLINE: |JLE 121 |DEPARTMENT: |CTE |

| |(Discipline and Number) | | |

|COURSE TITLE: |Advanced Officer Training |

(Maximum of 58 spaces)

|ABBREVIATED TITLE: |AOT |

(Maximum of 28 spaces)

|SEMESTER UNITS: .5-2 |LEC HOURS PER WEEK: .34-.57 |LAB HOURS PER WEEK: 1.6-2.97 |

|Classification: |Non Credit Category: |Occupational Code (SAM): |

|TOP Code: 2105.50 |LEH Factor:       |FTE Load:       |

CATALOG DESCRIPTION:

No Change Change

This course is designed to provide a mechanism wherby students may insure that the necessary new skills and those previously learned skills are maintained and reinforced. This course satisfies Advanced Officer Training requirements form the Commission on Peace Officers Standards and Training (POST).

COURSE REQUISITES:

List all prerequisites separated by AND/OR, as needed. Also fill out and submit the Prerequisite/Advisory form.

No Change

Replaces existing Advisory/Prerequisite

In addition to existing Advisory/Prerequisite

Prerequisite:

POST Basic Certificate or Equivalent

Penal Code Section 13511.5 requires that each applicant for admission to a basic course of training certified by the Commission (including the P.C. 832 course) that includes the carrying and use of firearms, and who is not sponsored by a local or other law enforcement agency, or is not a peace officer employed by a state or local agency, department, or district, shall be required to submit written certification from the Department of Justice that the applicant has no criminal history background which would disqualify him or her, from owning, possessing, or having under his or her control a firearm.

Valid California Drivers License

Co-requisite:      

Advisory:      

GRADING SYSTEM:

Select only one: No Change

Standard Letter grade

Pass/ No Pass

Option of a standard letter grade or pass/no pass

Non Credit

REPEATABLE FOR CREDIT:

(Note: Course Outline must include additional skills that will be acquired by repeating this course.)

No Change

Credit Course Yes No If yes, how many times? 1 2 3

Non Credit Course Yes No If yes, how many times? 1 2 3 Unlimited

(Noncredit only)

STAND ALONE:

No Change

Yes (Course is NOT included in a degree or certificate program)

No (Course is included in a degree or certificate program)

METHODS OF INSTRUCTION:

No Change

     

RECOMMENDED OR REQUIRED TEXT/S:

(The following information must be provided: Author, Title, Publisher, Year of Publication, Reading level and Reading level verification)

Required Recommended N/A

|Author:       |Title:       |Publisher:       |Year of Publication:       |

|or other appropriate college level text. |

|ISBN:       (if available) |Reading level of text:       grade |Verified by:       |

|Other textbooks or materials to be purchased by the student:       |

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES:

1. Complete this section in a manner that demonstrates student’s use of critical thinking and reasoning skills. These include the ability to formulate and analyze problems and to employ rational processes to achieve increased understanding. Reference Bloom's Taxonomy of action verbs.

2. List the Type of Measures that will be used to measure the student learning outcomes, such as written exam, oral exam, oral report, role playing, project, performance, demonstration, etc

3. Identify which Institutional Learning Outcomes (ILO) apply to this course. List them, by number, in order of emphasis. For example: "2, 1" would indicate Cognition and Communication.

(1) Communication, (2) Cognition, (3) Information Competency, (4) Social Interaction, (5) Aesthetic Responsiveness, (6) Personal Development & Responsibility, (7) Content Specific.

4. For GE courses, enter the GE Learning Outcomes for this course. For example "A1, A2". GE Learning Outcomes are listed below.

|1) Student Learning Outcomes |2) Measure |3) Institutional |4) GE Learning Outcome |

| | |Learning Outcome |(only required if GE |

| | | |applicable) |

|Define priorities of law enforcement response to active shooter situations |Measure: Demonstrate |ILO: 2,3,7 |GE-LO:       |

|including immediated deployment, dynamic situations, incident transition and| | | |

|communication, and demonstrate appropriate response and techniques | | | |

|Analyze and demonstrate knowledge on pursuit driving as well as legal and |Measure: demonstrate, exan|ILO: 2,3 |GE-LO:       |

|moral issues associated with pursuits | | | |

|Demonstrate proper decision making, deployment and post deployment |Measure: demonstrate |ILO: 2,3 |GE-LO:       |

|procedures and techniques | | | |

|State the legal definition of sexual harassment |Measure: oral, exam |ILO: 2,3,1 |GE-LO:       |

|      |Measure:       |ILO:       |GE-LO:       |

|      |Measure:       |ILO:       |GE-LO:       |

|      |Measure:       |ILO:       |GE-LO:       |

|      |Measure:       |ILO:       |GE-LO:       |

|      |Measure:       |ILO:       |GE-LO:       |

|      |Measure:       |ILO:       |GE-LO:       |

GENERAL EDUCATION LEARNING OUTCOMES

AREA A Communications in the English Language

After completing courses in Area A, students will be able to do the following:

1. Receive, analyze, and effectively respond to verbal communication.

2. Formulate, organize and logically present verbal information.

3. Write clear and effective prose using forms, methods, modes and conventions of English grammar that best achieve the writing’s purpose.

4. Advocate effectively for a position using persuasive strategies, argumentative support, and logical reasoning.

5. Employ the methods of research to find information, analyze its content, and appropriately incorporate it into written work.

6. Read college course texts and summarize the information presented.

7. Analyze the ideas presented in college course materials and be able to discuss them or present them in writing.

8. Communicate conclusions based on sound inferences drawn from unambiguous statements of knowledge and belief.

9. Explain and apply elementary inductive and deductive processes, describe formal and informal fallacies of language and thought, and compare effectively matters of fact and issues of judgment and opinion.

AREA B Physical Universe and its Life Forms

After completing courses in Area B, students will be able to do the following:

1. Explain concepts and theories related to physical and biological phenomena.

2. Identify structures of selected living organisms and relate structure to biological function.

3. Recognize and utilize appropriate mathematical techniques to solve both abstract and practical problems.

4. Utilize safe and effectives laboratory techniques to investigate scientific problems.

5. Discuss the use and limitations of the scientific process in the solution of problems.

6. Make critical judgments about the validity of scientific evidence and the applicability of scientific theories.

7. Utilize appropriate technology for scientific and mathematical investigations and recognize the advantages and disadvantages of that technology.

8. Work collaboratively with others on labs, projects, and presentations.

9. Describe the influence of scientific knowledge on the development of world’s civilizations as recorded in the past as well as in present times.

AREA C Arts, Foreign Language, Literature and Philosophy

After completing courses in Area C, students will be able to do the following:

1. Demonstrate knowledge of the language and content of one or more artistic forms: visual arts, music, theater, film/television, writing, digital arts.

2. Analyze an artistic work on both its emotional and intellectual levels.

3. Demonstrate awareness of the thinking, practices and unique perspectives offered by a culture or cultures other than one’s own.

4. Recognize the universality of the human experience in its various manifestations across cultures.

5. Express objective and subjective responses to experiences and describe the integrity of emotional and intellectual response.

6. Analyze and explain the interrelationship between self, the creative arts, and the humanities, and be exposed to both non-Western and Western cultures.

7. Contextually describe the contributions and perspectives of women and of ethnic and other minorities.

AREA D Social, Political, and Economic Institutions

After completing courses in Area D, students will be able to do the following:

1. Identify and analyze key concepts and theories about human and/or societal development.

2. Critique generalizations and popular opinion about human behavior and society, distinguishing opinion and values from scientific observation and study.

3. Demonstrate an understanding of the use of research and scientific methodologies in the study of human behavior and societal change.

4. Analyze different cultures and their influence on human development or society, including how issues relate to race, class and gender.

5. Describe and analyze cultural and social organizations, including similarities and differences between various societies.

AREA E Lifelong Understanding and Self-Development

After completing courses in Area E, students will be able to do the following:

1. Demonstrate an awareness of the importance of personal development.

2. Examine the integration of one’s self as a psychological, social, and physiological being.

3. Analyze human behavior, perception, and physiology and their interrelationships including sexuality, nutrition, health, stress, the social and physical environment, and the implications of death and dying.

AREA F Cultural Diversity

After completing courses in Area F, students will be able to do the following:

1. Connect knowledge of self and society to larger cultural contexts.

2. Articulate the differences and similarities between and within cultures.

|HOURS |Content, Student Performance Objectives, and Out-of-Class Assignments |

| |Hours - Total number of hours should be based on an 18 week term, even though we are on a 16 week calendar. For example, a 3 |

| |unit course should have 54 hours, less 2 for the final. |

| |Out of Class Assignments: essays, library research, problems, projects required outside of class on a 2 to 1 basis for Lecture |

| |units granted. |

|8-24 Hours |CONTENT: |

| |Module 1: Active Shooter |

| | |

| |I. Historical Overview of Active Shooter Situations |

| |A. Past Incidents |

| |B. Police Lessons Learned |

| |II. Definitions |

| |A. Active Shooter |

| |B. Immediate Deployment |

| |C. Dynamic Situation |

| |D. Static Situation |

| |E. Time Line of Violence |

| |F. Incident Transition |

| |G. Immediate Response vs Barricaded Suspect |

| |III. Priorities for Law Enforcement |

| |A. Police Equipment and Training Needs |

| |B. Surrender, Capture or Neutralization of Threat |

| |C. Lives of those in Close Proiximity |

| |D. Lives and Safety of Citizens and Officers |

| |E. Containment |

| |F. Post Incident Investigation and Return to Normalacy |

| |IV. When to Deploy |

| |A. Suspect Displays Aggressive Deadly Behavior |

| |B. Incident Locations |

| |C. Citizen/Officer Rescue |

| |V. Initial Responder |

| |A. Assessment of Situation |

| |B. Establish Incident Commander |

| |C. Request Resources, Additional Officers, Fire, Medics |

| |D. Number of Suspect(s) Involved |

| |E. Number of Victim(s) Involved |

| |F. Type of weapon(s) Involved |

| |G. Type of Location Involved |

| |H. Determine if immediate action/Rapid Deployment Tactics are necessary |

| |I. Safe Approach Route |

| |J. Command Post Location |

| |K. Assemble Contact of Rescue Team |

| |VI. Contact Team Responsibilities |

| |A. Contact Immediate Threat |

| |B. Stop Deadly Behavior |

| |C. Limit Suspect Movement |

| |D. Prevent Escape |

| |E. Communicate Progress to Resources |

| |1. Expand Rescue Team Size or Number of Teams |

| |2. Custody and Control |

| |3. Identification and Accountability of Victims |

| |VII. Rescue Team: Priority to Rescue and Recover Victim |

| |A. Method of entry to approach victim |

| |B. Report suspect location |

| |C. Extract victim(s) to a safe area |

| |D. Obtain medical assistance as required |

| |E. Coordinate actions with Contact Team |

| |F. Multiple Victims |

| |1. Expand Rescue Team Size of Number |

| |2. Custody and Control |

| |3. Identification and Accountibility of Victims |

| |VIII. Resolution of Incident |

| |A. Most likely by Patrol |

| |B. Non Tradition Response |

| |C. Minimum Number of Officers |

| |D. Properly Equipped |

| |E. Properly Trained |

| |F. Ability to Transition to a Barricade Situation |

| |STUDENT PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES (SPO): Define priorities of law enforcement response to active shooter situations including |

| |immediated deployment, dynamic situations, incident transition and communication. |

| |Out-of-Class Assignments: reading assignment |

|8-24 Hours |CONTENT: Module 2: Vehicle Operations |

| | |

| |2A. Pursuit Decision |

| | |

| |I. The Pursuit Issue |

| |A. Collision frequency |

| |B. Death stactctics and ratios |

| |C. Personal costs and liability |

| |D. Research on public attitudes |

| |II. Legal & Liability Issues |

| |A. Legal Authorizations |

| |B. Qualified Immunity |

| |C. Proximate Caution |

| |D. Federal Civil Liability |

| |E. Negligence |

| |F. Liability Buildup |

| |G. Use of Force |

| |III. Human Dynamics |

| |A. Cultural Factors |

| |B. Physiological Effects |

| |C. The Pursuit Time Line |

| |IV. Myths vs Facts (Myths 1-12) |

| |A. The Pursuit Triangle |

| |B. The Public Duty Doctrine |

| |C. Creating the Conditions |

| |V. The Traditional Decision-making Model |

| |A. Risks v Benefit Analysis |

| |B. "Micro Factors" |

| |C. Probability v Severity |

| |VI. The "Micro-Factor" Model |

| |A. Why "macro-factors"? |

| |B. The "3QFC" Pursuit Decision Making Model |

| |C. The "Ultimate Objective" in Decision-Making Training |

| |D. 3 QFC Policy Statement |

| |E. Catch-up driving |

| |F. Supervisory/Leadership Issues |

| |VII. Pre-Incident Decision Making |

| |VIII. Pursuit Prevention & Termination Strategies |

| |A. Prevention |

| |B. Endinig Pursuits |

| |IX. Course Evaluation |

| | |

| |2B. Driver Awareness |

| | |

| |I. Steering control |

| |A. Seating position |

| |B. Steering method |

| |II. Throttle Control |

| |A. Full throttle is total depression of accelerator pedal |

| |B. Decrease of throttle will tighten the arc of the driving line in a turn |

| |III. Weight transfer |

| |A. Weight distributed between front and rear wheels |

| |B. Engine location has greater part of weight distribution |

| |C. Types of weight Transfer |

| |IV. Speed Judgment |

| |A. The ability of a driver to estimate a safe speed for any given situation |

| |V. Brake Application |

| |A. Types of braking |

| |B. Roadway Position |

| |C. Driving advantages |

| |D. Driving points in a turn |

| |VI. Legal And Moral Aspects |

| |A. California Vehicle Codes |

| |B. Case Law |

| |C. Agency Policy |

| |D. Moral Aspects |

| |VII. Vehicle Care And Maintenance |

| |A. General appearance |

| |B. Tires |

| |C. Lights |

| |D. Equipment |

| |E. Body Damage |

| |F. Interior |

| |VIII. Defensive Driving |

| |A. Defensive Drivers |

| |B. Collision Avoidance |

| |C. Space cushion |

| |D. Intersections |

| |E. Lane changes |

| |IX. Vehicle Operation Factors |

| |A. Operational Tactics and Considerations |

| |B. Use of MDT/Computer |

| |C. Use radio for communications of immediate nature |

| |D. Collisions while operating the MDT/Computer will usually be found to be |

| |preventable |

| |E. Blocking access to intersections |

| |F. Blocking Roadway |

| |X. Maneuvering Course Exercises |

| |A. Typical class will use 4 selected exercises |

| |XI. Driving Simulators |

| |1. Defensive Driving |

| |2. Steering Control |

| |L. Testing and Evaluation |

| |1. Remediate any student below agency standard |

| |SPO: Demonstrate vehicle control using maximum speed with minimum steering while negotiating a turn. |

| |Out-of-Class Assignments: Review skills and techniques from course for skills test. |

|8-16 Hours |CONTENT: MODULE 3: Medical and Emergency Services |

| | |

| |3A: First Aid |

| | |

| |I. Bleeding types |

| |A. Arterial |

| |B. Venous |

| |C. Capillary |

| |II. Wound Types |

| |A. Abrasions |

| |B. Puncture |

| |C. Lacerations |

| |D. Incision |

| |E. Avulsion |

| |F. Amputation |

| |III. Controlling Bleeding |

| |A. Exposure |

| |B. Dressing |

| |C. Elevation |

| |D. Pressure Bandage |

| |E. Pressure Point |

| |F. Tourniquet |

| |IV. Demonstration |

| |A. Practice |

| |B. Skills Test |

| |V. Shock |

| |A. Possible Causes |

| |B. Treatment |

| |VI. Bandaging |

| |A. Proper selection and application of bandage |

| |B. Immobilization |

| |C. Demonstration |

| |VII. Bone and Joint Injuries |

| |A. Fractures |

| |B. Dislocations |

| |C. Sprains |

| |D. Treatment |

| |VIII. Head Injuries |

| |A. Assessment |

| |B. Spinal Precautions |

| |C. Facial Injuries |

| |D. Respiratory Problems |

| |E. Treatment |

| |IX. Diabetic Emergencies |

| |A. Causes |

| |X. Hyperglycemia (Diabetic Coma) |

| |A. Signs and Symptoms |

| |B. Treatment |

| |XI. Hypoglycemia (Insulin Shock) |

| |A. Signs and Symptoms |

| |B. Treatment |

| |XII. Seizures |

| |A. Types and causes |

| |B. Treatment |

| |XIII. Strokes |

| |A. Signs and symptoms |

| |B. Treatment |

| |XIV. Cardiac emergencies |

| |A. Signs and symptoms |

| |B. Treatment |

| |C. Complications |

| |XV. Burns |

| |A. Treatment |

| |B. Complications |

| |XVI. Heat Emergencies |

| |A. Cramps |

| |B. Exhaustion |

| |C. Stroke |

| |XVII. Chest Injuries |

| |A.Signs and symptoms |

| |B. Treatment |

| |XVIII. Abdominal Injuries |

| |A. Signs and symptoms |

| |B. Treatment |

| | |

| |3B: CPR |

| |I. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - Adult |

| |A. ABC's |

| |B. Proper victim position |

| |C. Locating Compression point |

| |D. Performing compressions |

| |E. Rechecking pulse and continuing cycles |

| |II. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - Child |

| |A. ABC's |

| |B. Proper victim position |

| |C. Locating Compression point |

| |D. Performing compressions |

| |E. Rechecking pulse and continuing cycles |

| |III. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - Infant |

| |A. ABC's |

| |B. Proper victim position |

| |C. Locating Compression point |

| |D. Performing compressions |

| |E. Rechecking pulse and continuing cycles |

| |IV. Practice |

| |A. Skills Test |

| |V. Resuce Breathing |

| |A. Types |

| |B. Ventilation Rates |

| |VI. Use of Automatic External Defibrillator (AED) |

| | |

| |3C: Infectious Disease |

| | |

| |I. Bloodborn Pathogens |

| |A. HIV |

| |B. Hepatitis A |

| |C. Hepatitis B |

| |D. Hepatitis C |

| |II. Diseases |

| |A. Syphilis |

| |B. West Nile Virus |

| |C. Tuberculosis |

| |D. Influenza |

| |III. Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) |

| |A. Use of Gloves, gown, mask |

| |B. Hand washing |

| |C. Latex Allergy / Sensitivity |

| |IV. Written test |

| |SPO: Students will properly demonstrate adult, child and infant CPR and Rescue Breathing techniques during skills exam. |

| |Out-of-Class Assignments: Department Policy review |

|8-24 Hours |CONTENT: Module 4: Defensive Tactics |

| | |

| |4A: Impact Weapons |

| |I. Safety and classroom rules, introductions, and legal update. |

| |A. Introduce instructors and course outline. |

| |B. Review safety guidelines and procedures. |

| |C. Update of appropriate legal issues and departmental policy. |

| |1. Use of force. |

| |2. General Orders. |

| |3. Case Law. |

| |4. Penal and other codes. |

| |II. Basic Stance and Movement Drills. |

| |A. Position of Interview/advantage. |

| |B. Moving forward, backward, left and right. |

| |C. Pivots and turning. |

| |III. Impact weapons |

| |A. Front strike (with verbal commands) |

| |B. Rear strike |

| |C. Butt strike |

| |D. Weapon retention |

| |E. Weapon holstering |

| |IV. Ground fighting defense techniques |

| |A. Escaping the full mount |

| |B. Escaping the side mount |

| |C. Escaping the guard |

| |D. Escape the two handed choke from full or side mount |

| |E. Proper techniques to get back to feet |

| | |

| |4B: Arrest and Control Techniques |

| | |

| |I. Course Goals |

| |A. Sound officer safety principles |

| |B. Individual skill development |

| |C. Legal Justifications – Update and Review |

| |D. Control Holds |

| |E. Carotid Restraint Review |

| |F. Searching |

| |G. Handcuffing |

| |H. Takedowns and defensive “programming” |

| |I. Impact Weapons Review and Update |

| |II. Safety Procedures |

| |A. Equipment and weapon inspections |

| |B. Warm ups –purpose and issues |

| |C. All skills performed at no more than 50% speed and power |

| |D. All participants are safety officers |

| |E. No ground grappling |

| |F. No “horse play” |

| |III. Use of Force, Department Policy and Legal Issues |

| |A. Case law update, report documentation and policy. |

| |B. Tennessee v Garner |

| |C. Graham v Connor |

| |D. PC 835a |

| |E. Verbal Commands |

| |F. Department policy |

| |IV. Physical Conditioning |

| |A. Review physical conditioning benefits: |

| |1. Big “3” disablers |

| |B. Nutrition, Exercise and Preparation – The “How To” of survival |

| |V Body Balance - Stance and Movement |

| |A. Warm Up and Review of footwork |

| |B. How to fall to the ground safely and assume a fighting position |

| |1. Access to equipment on duty belt while in a fighting stance and on the ground |

| |VI. Spontaneous Assault Defense |

| |A. Officer positioning |

| |1. Stance |

| |2. Balance |

| |3. Distance |

| |B. Officer Response |

| |1. Hand positioning |

| |2. Body posture |

| |3. Mind Set |

| |C. Overview on handcuffing |

| |1. Application |

| |2. Injured Suspect |

| |D. Standing Handcuff |

| |1. Officer position of advantage |

| |2. Suspect position of disadvantage |

| |3. Verbal directions |

| |V. Takedowns |

| |A. Arm “Force” Takedowns |

| |1. Approach to suspect |

| |2. Body Dynamics – control & position |

| |3. Takedown |

| |4. Verbalization |

| |B. Head control takedowns |

| |1. Approach to suspect |

| |2. Head control position |

| |3. Takedown |

| |4. Verbalization |

| |C. Post takedown control – Restraining Devices |

| |1. Handcuffing |

| |2. Disengaging, Escalating, De-escalating |

| |VI. Search Techniques |

| |A. “Position of advantage” |

| |B. “Pat frisk” |

| |C. Searching the handcuffed person |

| |VII. Carotid Restraint |

| |A. Discuss history and body mechanics of techniques |

| |1. In custody deaths |

| |2. Specific dangers |

| |B. Discuss importance of following departmental policy |

| |1. Restraints “place” in use of force |

| |2. Documentation |

| |3. First aid, Ambulance or hospital, Medical clearance |

| |C. Practical Application of technique by students |

| |1. No pressure. |

| |D. Technique checks and Test student’s application |

| |VIII. Impact Weapon Review/Update |

| |A. Target Areas |

| |B. Traditional Non-Target Areas |

| |C. Agency Policy |

| |D. Long Range Strikes |

| |1. Body Mechanics |

| |2. Angle of Delivery |

| |E. Close Quarter Strikes |

| |1. Body Mechanics |

| |F. Alternative/Expedient Impact Weapon |

| | |

| |SPO: Define force options considerations, i.e. alternative/back up plan, department policy, multiple applications, multiple |

| |electronic weapons used on a subject and use on a handcuffed subject. |

| |Out-of-Class Assignments: Review the Use of Force Policy and Weapons/ Restraint Policy |

|16-40 Hours |CONTENT: Module 5: Firearms |

| | |

| |5A. Tactical Firearms |

| | |

| |I. Safety |

| |A. Weapons Safety Orientation, Review of Range and Shooting Safety Rules |

| |(Pre-range weapons unloading procedures and lunch/extended break reload/unload |

| |rules) |

| |1. Weapons Clearing Procedures |

| |2. Cardinal Rules |

| |B. Officer can be criminally and civilly liable for any injury or death caused by an |

| |improperly stored firearm |

| |3. General Rules |

| | |

| |II. LETHAL FORCE OVERVIEW |

| |A. Legal/Moral/Ethical Issues involving Use of Force/Lethal Force |

| |1. Officers are responsible for evaluating situations and deciding on the appropriate |

| |level of force |

| |2. Any use of force must be de-escalated once the situation stabilizes. |

| |Use only the amount of force necessary to overcome resistance |

| |3. Officers are responsible for being familiar with state law as well as department policy |

| |4. Target recognition |

| |B. Civil Implications of using Force/Lethal Force |

| |1. Officers are obligated to follow state law and department policy |

| |C. Report Writing and Preliminary Investigation Overview |

| |1. Any use of force must be documented in a police report and will be reviewed to make |

| |sure the use of force was appropriate |

| |III. USE OF FORCE/LETHAL FORCE AND FIREARMS POLICY |

| |A. Use of Force Options |

| |1. Lethal Force within the spectrum of force options |

| |2. Verbal, Taser, Hands, Intermediate force, Less Lethal, Lethal Force |

| |3. Escalation and De-escalation Process |

| |B. Department Policy |

| |1. Reasonable Cause to believe |

| |2. Imminent Threat |

| |3. Death or Great Bodily Injury |

| |4. Fleeing Violent Felon Specifications |

| |C. Supporting Case Law |

| |1. Tennessee vs. Garner |

| |2. Graham vs. Conner |

| | |

| |IV. POST LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS KILLED/ASSAULTED (LEOKA) STUDIES |

| |A. 1994/2001 Reports |

| |B. Vital Statistics from LEOKA Reports |

| |C. Conclusive Tactical Analysis |

| |1. Low Light Conditions |

| |2. 5 - 10 feet |

| |3. 2 rounds |

| |4. 2 seconds |

| |5. Officer Accuracy: averages 10-20 % |

| |6. Use of Cover |

| | |

| |V. FUNDAMENTALS OF SHOOTING |

| |A. Stance |

| |1. Strong, Balanced Ready Position |

| |2. Isosceles or Weaver |

| |B. Grip |

| |1. Strong, Effective two-handed grip |

| |2. Isometric Pressure |

| |C. Sight Picture |

| |1. Sight Alignment |

| |2. Eye Focus - Front Sight Tip |

| |D. Trigger Control |

| |1. Press |

| |2. Straight back, steady pressure |

| |E. Breathing |

| |1. Controlled |

| |F. Recovery / Follow through |

| |1. All elements work together |

| |2. Handle recoil |

| |3. Controlled movement back on target |

| | |

| |VI. FIVE COUNT PISTOL PRESENTATION |

| |A. Count One |

| |1. Good Grip |

| |2. Holster Unsnapped |

| |3. Support hand/arm into chest position |

| |B. Count Two |

| |1. Draw |

| |2. De-cocker Off |

| |3. Pistol is rocked up and forward |

| |4. Wrist is positioned above holster |

| |5. Forearm parallel to ground |

| |6. Trigger finger is indexed |

| |C. Count Three |

| |1. Punch Pistol outward |

| |2. Into support hand |

| |3. Isometric Tension |

| |4. Low Ready Positioning |

| |D. Count Four |

| |1. Pistol raised to eye level |

| |2. Eye focus to front sight |

| |3. Sight alignment/sight picture is verified |

| |E. Count Five |

| |1. Finger on Trigger |

| |2. Press |

| |3. Maintain sight alignment |

| |F. Target Recognition and Analysis |

| |G. Reholstering |

| | |

| |VII. DRILLS AND COURSES-OF-FIRE |

| |A. Range Orientation and Safety Briefing (Second range safety, and command sequence) |

| |B. All Courses emphasize: |

| |1. Weapons Safety |

| |2. Muzzle and Fire Discipline |

| |3. Fundamentals of Shooting |

| |4. Five Count Presentation |

| |C. Warm up Course |

| |1. 8 rounds into the 10 ring at 15 yards (Precision Shooting) |

| |2. 2 times |

| |D. Emergency reloading |

| |1. Reloading when you have an empty weapon |

| |2. Drop empty magazine immediately |

| |3. Move to cover if possible |

| |4. Remove full magazine from holder |

| |5. Index full magazine with your off hand index finger |

| |6. Insert full magazine using index finger as a guide |

| |7. Be sure the magazine is seated and release slide to chamber round |

| |8. Practice and Proficiency demonstration |

| |E. Flashlight Shooting Exercise |

| |1. Carries (define)/Tactical |

| |2. Alternate flashlight shooting techniques |

| |3. Safety precautions |

| |4. Reloading |

| |F. Weapon Malfunction Exercise (split class into two groups) |

| |1. Group 1, Failure to Fire |

| |2. Group 2, Double Feed |

| |G. Failure to incapacitate suspect (Drugs/Body Armor) Drills |

| |1. Theory |

| |2. Shot Placement |

| |H. Moving and shooting |

| |1. Moving target is more difficult for suspects to acquire and hit |

| |2. Allows officers to move toward cover while continuing to return fire |

| |3. Only move as fast as you can accurately shoot |

| |4. Course of fire |

| |Testing: Any student scoring below standard on any exercise, as established by the |

| |presenter, will remediate test until standard is achieved. |

| | |

| |5B: Long Barrel |

| |A. Shotgun Advantages and limitations |

| |1. Advantages |

| |2. Limitations |

| |3. Collateral damage |

| |B. Componants |

| |1. Trigger |

| |2. Barrel |

| |3. Muzzle |

| |4 . Ejection port |

| |5. Stock |

| |6. Butt |

| |7. Safety |

| |C. Steps for loading/unloading |

| |a. Loading and unloading procedures |

| |D. Firearms Safety |

| |1. Safety Check Basic Steps |

| | |

| |Module 6: Use of Force |

| | |

| |6A: Use of Force Update |

| | |

| |I. Update |

| |A. Define reasonable force as stated in the California Penal Code |

| |B. Discuss the components of the Fourth Amendment standard for determining objective |

| |reasonableness as determined by the U.S. Supreme Court |

| |C. Explain the legal framework establishing a peace officer’s authority during a legal |

| |arrest,including: |

| |1. Suspect’s requirement to submit to arrest without resistance |

| | |

| |II. Less Lethal |

| |A. Define the term force option |

| |B. Identify the ultimate goal of using force is to overcome resistance in order to gain |

| |control of an individual and the situation |

| |C. Recognize and demonstrate force options or the amount of force an officer may use |

| |based on the suspect’s level of resistance |

| |D. Explain the importance of training and ongoing practice in responding to potentially |

| |dangerous situations that may require the use of force |

| |E. Identify the importance of effective tactical communication when using force |

| | |

| |6B. Taser |

| |A. EW and the Human Body |

| |1. How device overrides the central nervous system |

| |2. Areas of the CNS affected |

| |3. Medical affects on the subjects |

| |B. Legal Issues with Use |

| |1. Recent cases |

| |2. Terminology used by court and in reports |

| |3. Terminology of the device |

| |C. Force options considerations |

| |1. Alternative/back-up plan |

| |2. Department policy |

| |3. Multiple applications |

| |4. Multiple electronic weapons used on a subject |

| |5. Use on handcuffed subject |

| |D. Known pre-existing medical considerations |

| |1. Age of subject |

| |2. Pregnant female |

| |3. Pacemaker |

| |4. Obviously frail |

| |E. Deployment |

| |1. Recommended distance from subject |

| |2. Target areas for subject |

| |3. Communications |

| |4. Evaluate effect after each application |

| |5. Application of additional or different force options |

| |6. Safely take subject into custody (cuff under power) |

| |7. Cover officer considerations in an arrest situation |

| |F. Post-deployment Considerations |

| |1. Medical assessment for subject or officers |

| |2. Supervisor notification |

| |3. Probe/dart removal |

| |4. Transportation/medical clearance |

| |5. Evidence collection |

| |G. Practical application and practice |

| |1. Drawing |

| |2. Aiming Exercises |

| |3. Arming Exercise |

| |4. Reload Exercise |

| |H. Firing pre-test check |

| |SPO: Compare various verbalizations available before, during and after use of force. |

| |OUT-OF-CLASS ASSIGNMENTS: Review Department Policy |

|8-16 Hours |CONTENT: Module 7: Legal Updates |

| | |

| |7A: Domestic Violence |

| | |

| |A. Nature & Dynamics of Domestic Violence: Power |

| |1. Control Tactics |

| |2. Relationship abuse |

| |3. Cultural stereotypes |

| |4. Effects on Children |

| |B. Identifying & Understanding the Behavior of Abused Women |

| |1. Residency issue |

| |2. Peer influence |

| |3. Safety |

| |C. Identifying & Understanding the Perpetrator |

| |1. Manipulation |

| |2. Retaliation |

| |3. Counterclaims of abuse |

| |D. Control |

| |1. Batterer Accountability |

| |2. Legal Issues |

| |E. Probable Cause |

| |1. Determining Self-Defense |

| |2. Identifying the Predominant Aggressor |

| |3. Proper application of the “probable cause” standard to domestic assault cases |

| |F. Officer Safety |

| |1. Strategies |

| |2. All available information from the dispatcher |

| |3. Checking for weapons. |

| |G. Successful Prosecution |

| |1. Document the abuse for successful prosecution |

| |2. Collecting evidence |

| | |

| |7B: Sexual Harassment |

| | |

| |A. State the legal definition of sexual harassment |

| |1. Sexual harassment refers to sexually oriented behavior that is unwelcome, |

| |personallyoffensive, and creates an intimidating, hostile or offensive work |

| |environment. |

| |2. What makes certain behavior sexual harassment is the complainant’s interpretation |

| |of the behavior, regardless of the originator’s intent. What one individual thinks is |

| |humorous, for example, could be offensive to another and therefore considered |

| |sexual harassment. |

| |3. Sexual harassment can be defined as unwelcome and unwanted sexual advances, |

| |requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature. |

| |4. State laws |

| |5. Additional statutes |

| |6. Civil liabilities |

| |B. Complaints |

| |1. Complaints filed under federal civil rights law are filed with the Equal |

| |Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC.. The EEOC investigates job |

| |discrimination claims, including claims of sexual harassment. The EEOC may |

| |investigate the complaint and make an award to the complaining party. |

| |C. Concept of Quid Pro Quo |

| |1. Quid pro quo is a form of sexual harassment in which the submission to, or |

| |rejection of,sexual advances is explicitly or implicitly made a condition of |

| |employment or an employment decision. |

| |D. Current case law |

| |E. Behaviors that constitute sexual harassment |

| |1. Verbal |

| |2. Physical |

| |3. Visual |

| |4. Written material |

| | |

| | |

| |SPO: . Explain the mandated sexual harassment complaint process guidelines |

| |OUT-OF-CLASS ASSIGNMENTS: Case study |

|8-24 Hours |CONTENT: Module 8 |

| | |

| |8A. Racial Profiling |

| |A. Define the term stereotype |

| |1. A stereotype is a preconceived or over-simplified generalization involving negative |

| |or positive beliefs about another group. When an individual is stereotyped, that |

| |person is perceived as having specific behavioral traits and abilities. This perception |

| |is based solely on the individual’s apparent membership in a certain group. |

| |2. Stereotypes can be based on a number of factors including, but not limited to: |

| |a. nationality |

| |b. ethnicity |

| |c. race |

| |d. gender |

| |e. sexual orientation, |

| |f. socioeconomic status, |

| |g. age |

| |h. physical ability. |

| |3. Human tendency |

| |a. Stereotyping is a natural human tendency. |

| |B. Discuss the dangers of relying on stereotypes to form judgments or to determine actions |

| |1. Stereotyping can mean not only ascribing differences to other groups but can also |

| |result in making a judgment (positive or negative. based on those perceived |

| |differences. |

| |2. Dangerous Assumptions |

| |3. Stereotypes of law enforcement |

| |C. Prejudice |

| |1. Prejudice is a prejudgment or point of view about a person or group of individuals |

| |that is usually formed before the facts are known. |

| |2. Positive individual experiences with diverse people and groups, increased knowledge |

| |and maintaining an open mind are all keys to overcoming prejudice and stereotyping |

| |3. Subconscious prejudice |

| |4. Group prejudice |

| |5. Prejudice and law enforcement |

| |D. Discrimination |

| |1. Discrimination is an action or behavior that is prompted or based on prejudiced |

| |thought. It includes differential treatment based on an unsubstantiated or unfair |

| |categorization. |

| |2. Prejudice vs. discrimination |

| |3. Possible effects of prejudice and discrimination |

| |4. Human rights |

| |5. Strategies for challenging prejudice |

| |E. Racial profiling, including the: |

| |1. Conceptual definition |

| |2. Misconceptions |

| |3. Truth |

| |F. Legal definition |

| |1. The law defines racial profiling as, “...the practice of detaining the suspect based on a |

| |broad set of criteria which casts suspicion on the entire class of people without any |

| |individualized suspicion on the particular person being stopped. (Penal Code Section |

| |13519.4(d.) |

| |2. The law applies to all protected classes including race, gender, and religion. |

| |3. Civil rights |

| |G. Fourth Amendment |

| |1. The Fourth Amendment of the United States Constitution: |

| |protects the peoples’ right to be free from unreasonable detentions or searches and |

| |seizures, and requires probable cause for warrants to be issued. |

| |2. Reasonable suspicion or probable cause for detentions or searches and seizures |

| |H. Fourteenth Amendment |

| |1. The Fourteenth Amendment of the United States Constitution: |

| |requires that peace officers apply the law equally to all people regardless of race, |

| |creed, nationality, religious preference or national origin. |

| |I. Criminal profiling vs. racial profiling |

| |1. Criminal profiling is a legitimate practice based on articulable behaviors or |

| |characteristics that can be analyzed and evaluated. Officers must have individualized |

| |suspicion based on articulable behavior or characteristics to detain anyone. |

| |2. Racial profiling occurs when race alone is used to predict criminality. |

| | |

| |8B. Cultural Diversity |

| | |

| |A. Cultural diversity |

| |1. The representation or existence of individuals with distinctly different group |

| |affiliations within one organization, community, state, nation, or other social |

| |system. Such group affiliations can be based on culture, ethnicity, gender, sexual |

| |orientation, etc. |

| |2. Awareness and understanding of the diverse cultures within communities |

| |B. Culture as a social environment |

| |1. Identifying with a cultural or ethnic group can elicit strong feelings of pride, shared |

| | |

| |beliefs, values, or history. |

| |2. Cultural or ethnic groupings can provide a social environment |

| |C. Benefits for officers who learn how to recognize and respect diversity. |

| |1. Personal |

| |2. Professional |

| |D. Accepting diversity |

| |1. A conscious effort is required to learn to accept the ever-changing diversity within |

| |a community or law enforcement agency. |

| |E. The historical and current cultural composition of California |

| |1. California’s past |

| |2. California’s future |

| |SPO: Identify the diverse cultures in the student’s community |

| |OUT-OF-CLASS ASSIGNMENTS: reading assignment |

|8-36 Hours |CONTENT: Module 9: Patrol Procedures |

| | |

| |9A: Officer Safety |

| | |

| |A. Officer Safety on Patrol |

| |1. Fatal errors Statistical analysis of incidents involving officers killed or assaulted |

| |in the line of duty has found that most of the deadly incidents could have been |

| |prevented. |

| |2. Officers should keep in mind and avoid committing any of the following fatal |

| |errors while on patrol. |

| |3. Inappropriate attitude |

| |B. Attempting to handle dangerous situations beyond one’s ability |

| |1. Rushing into the situation without any plan of action |

| |2. Failure to establish a plan of action prior to engaging the suspect |

| |3. Not considering alternative actions |

| |C. Inadequate communication |

| |1. Not establishing roles (cover, contact, etc.) |

| |2. Failure to work with other officers as a team |

| |3. Physical and mental fatigue |

| |D. Poor positioning |

| |1. Abandoning a safe location |

| |2. Being too close or in front of the suspect |

| |E. Ignoring danger signs |

| |1. Allowing the assignment to become “routine” |

| |2. Lack of alertness |

| |3. Failure to watch a suspect’s hands |

| |4. Becoming distracted and allowing suspects to arm themselves or assault the officer |

| |5. Relaxing too soon |

| |F. Improper use or no use of handcuffs |

| |G. Failure to search or conducting a poor search |

| |1. Making assumptions based on overconfidence or inadequate technique |

| |H. Poor care and maintenance of equipment |

| |1. Dirty or inoperative weapon |

| |2. Failure to keep equipment in top condition |

| |I . Elements of officer safety |

| |1. Officer safety refers to the practical application of tactically sound procedures to |

| |perform law enforcement activities in a safe and effective manner. |

| |J. Officer safety involves: |

| |1. The attitude and physical conditioning of the officer, |

| |2. Initial and ongoing training, |

| |3. Appropriate care and use of equipment, and |

| |4. Utilization of available resources. |

| |K. Officer safety guidelines |

| |1. Approach every contact with officer safety in mind. |

| |2. Be mentally prepared. |

| |3. Maintain skills. |

| |4. Take advantage of recurrent training to maintain skills and overcome complacency. |

| |5. Always be aware of suspect’s hands. |

| |6. Be aware of and use available cover. |

| |7. Ask for backup when necessary. |

| |8. Use available communication systems. |

| |9. Be aware of distance and positioning. |

| |10. Utilize proper safety equipment. |

| | |

| |9B: Patrol Procedures |

| | |

| |A. Selection of a patrol strategy |

| |1. An officer’s choice of a patrol strategy is dependent on a number of factors |

| |B. Select appropriate actions for peace officers who are conducting security checks |

| |1. Security checks |

| |C. Checks |

| |1. Initial Asssessment |

| |2. Involved Parties |

| |3. Additional Officers |

| |D. Cover and concealment |

| |1. “Cover” is a term often associated with combat tactics. |

| |2. Concealment refers to anything that prevents an opponent from observing the |

| |officer (e.g., bushes, small trees, tall grass, dark shadows, large crowds, lines |

| |of moving vehicles, etc.). |

| |E. Responsibilities |

| |1. The roles and responsibilities of contact and cover officers. |

| |F. One- and two officer units |

| |1. Patrol alone or with another officer in the patrol unit. |

| |G. Initial briefings |

| |1. Requesting cover |

| |H. Weapon searches/handcuffing |

| |1. The most hazardous moments of the majority of contacts with suspects occurs during |

| |a patdown search for weapons or when the suspect is beinghandcuffed. |

| |2. While on patrol, officers can encounter some of the most dangerous and |

| |threatening conditions. |

| |3. Officers are killed or assaulted in the line of duty when on patrol more than any |

| |other law enforcement assignment. |

| |SPO: Identify the roles and responsiblities of contact officers on patrol exercises. |

| |OUT-OF-CLASS ASSIGNMENTS: Reading assignment |

|8-32 Hours |CONTENT: Module 10: Report Writing |

| | |

| |10A:Report Writing Review |

| | |

| |I. Reports Defined, Types, Uses and Purposes |

| |A. Types: |

| |1. Arrest |

| |2. Crime |

| |3. Evidence |

| |4. Incident |

| |5. Activity |

| |6. Memorandum |

| |7. Supplemental |

| |8. Specific (narcotics intoxication, traffic accident) |

| | |

| |B. General Definition – “a document on a departmental form and kept as a record” The |

| |characteristics are that any report be: |

| |1. Clear |

| |2. Accurate |

| |3. Concise |

| |4. Factual |

| |5. Complete |

| |6. Objective |

| |C. Uses and Purposes: |

| |1. Criminal Investigations – for ultimately filing criminal complaints or not. |

| |2. Statistical Data – for crime analysis, trends, locations, and M.O. |

| |3. Documentation |

| |4. Reference |

| |5. Media |

| | |

| |II. TELLING THE STORY |

| |A. Basics of the Report Process |

| |1. Garner the Facts |

| |2. Observations |

| |3. Interviews |

| |4. Use of a Synopsis |

| |B. Begin at the Beginning |

| |1. When or how did you get involved? (dispatch/observation/citizen reporter) |

| |2. Where were you – does it matter? |

| |3. What did you observe first? |

| |4. Who was Where? |

| |C. What Were The Steps You Took? |

| |1. Chronological Order – most used |

| |2. Walk yourself back through it |

| |3. Other methodologies?? |

| |D. What Needs To Be Done – |

| |1. If you have completely told what you did then what remains is what remains |

| |2. Examples of a disposition (a.k.a. closing the report): |

| | |

| |III. NOTE TAKING |

| |A. Brief Notations |

| |1. Legible |

| |2. Understandable |

| |3. Consistent with the report |

| |4. Might become a “permanent” note |

| |B. List the types of information that might be included in a note – easel exercise for open |

| |discussion |

| |1. Brief outline form |

| |2. Sketch |

| |3. Taping |

| | |

| |IV. REPORT FORM COMPLETION |

| |A. Department form – incident or crime report. |

| |1. Write a report of the scene making it as detailed as possible |

| |SPO: Write a report of a mock crime scene making it as detailed as possible |

| |OUT-OF-CLASS ASSIGNMENTS: Write Police Report |

|      Hours |CONTENT:       |

| |SPO:       |

| |OUT-OF-CLASS ASSIGNMENTS:       |

|      Hours |CONTENT:       |

| |SPO:       |

| |OUT-OF-CLASS ASSIGNMENTS:       |

|      Hours |CONTENT:       |

| |SPO:       |

| |OUT-OF-CLASS ASSIGNMENTS:       |

|      Hours |CONTENT:       |

| |SPO:       |

| |OUT-OF-CLASS ASSIGNMENTS:       |

|      Hours |CONTENT:       |

| |SPO:       |

| |OUT-OF-CLASS ASSIGNMENTS:       |

|      Hours |CONTENT:       |

| |SPO:       |

| |OUT-OF-CLASS ASSIGNMENTS:       |

|      Hours |CONTENT:       |

| |SPO:       |

| |OUT-OF-CLASS ASSIGNMENTS:       |

|      Hours |Final |

METHODS OF EVALUATION:

|CATEGORY 1 - The types of writing assignments required: |

|Percent range of total grade: 15 % to 20 % |

| Written Homework |

| Reading Reports |

| Lab Reports |

| Essay Exams |

| Term or Other Papers |

| Other:       |

|If this is a degree applicable course, but substantial writing assignments are not appropriate, indicate reason: |

| Course is primarily computational |

| Course primarily involves skill demonstration or problem solving |

|CATEGORY 2 -The problem-solving assignments required: |

|Percent range of total grade: 20 % to 30 % |

| Homework Problems |

| Field Work |

| Lab Reports |

| Quizzes |

| Exams |

| Other:       |

|CATEGORY 3 -The types of skill demonstrations required: |

|Percent range of total grade: 40 % to 50 % |

| Class Performance/s |

| Field Work |

| Performance Exams |

|CATEGORY 4 - The types of objective examinations used in the course: |

|Percent range of total grade: 20 % to 30 % |

| Multiple Choice |

| True/False |

| Matching Items |

| Completion |

| Other:       |

|CATEGORY 5 - Any other methods of evaluation: |

|Percent range of total grade:       % to       % |

|      |

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